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178 records – page 1 of 18.

A 5-year follow-up study of suicide attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46467
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E. Johnsson Fridell
A. Ojehagen
L. Träskman-Bendz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Cause of Death
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - mortality - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seventy-five patients were admitted to the ward of the Lund Suicide Research Center following a suicide attempt. After 5 years, the patients were followed up by a personal semistructured interview covering sociodemographic, psychosocial and psychiatric areas. Ten patients (13%) had committed suicide during the follow-up period, the majority within 2 years. They tended to be older at the index attempt admission, and most of them had a mood disorder in comparison with the others. Two patients had died from somatic diseases. Forty-two patients were interviewed, of whom 17 (40%) had reattempted during the follow-up period, most of them within 3 years. Predictors for reattempt were young age, personality disorder, parents having received treatment for psychiatric disorder, and a poor social network. At the index attempt, none of the reattempters had diagnoses of adjustment disorders or anxiety disorders. At follow-up, reattempters had more psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), and their overall functioning (GAF) was poor compared to those who did not reattempt. All of the reattempters had long-lasting treatment ( > 3 years) as compared to 56% of the others. It is of great clinical importance to focus on treatment strategies for the vulnerable subgroup of self-destructive reattempters.
PubMed ID
8739657 View in PubMed
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Active multimodal psychotherapy in children and adolescents with suicidality: description, evaluation and clinical profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92095
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Högberg Goran
Hällström Tore
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. gor.hogberg@gmail.com
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Desensitization, Psychologic - methods
Eye Movements - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychodrama - methods
Psychotherapy - methods
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the clinical pattern of 14 youths with presenting suicidality, to describe an integrative treatment approach, and to estimate therapy effectiveness. Fourteen patients aged 10 to 18 years from a child and adolescent outpatient clinic in Stockholm were followed in a case series. The patients were treated with active multimodal psychotherapy. This consisted of mood charting by mood-maps, psycho-education, wellbeing practice and trauma resolution. Active techniques were psychodrama and body-mind focused techniques including eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. The patients were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment and at 22 months post treatment with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. The clinical pattern of the group was observed. After treatment there was a significant change towards normality in the Global Assessment of Functioning scale both immediately post-treatment and at 22 months. A clinical pattern, post trauma suicidal reaction, was observed with a combination of suicidality, insomnia, bodily symptoms and disturbed mood regulation. We conclude that in the post trauma reaction suicidality might be a presenting symptom in young people. Despite the shortcomings of a case series the results of this study suggest that a mood-map-based multimodal treatment approach with active techniques might be of value in the treatment of children and youth with suicidality.
PubMed ID
18783125 View in PubMed
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Adolescent and pre-adolescent suicide in Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225937
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Aug;36(6):432-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
D. Aldridge
K. St John
Author Affiliation
Lakehead Regional Family Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Aug;36(6):432-6
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Cause of Death
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Periodicity
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study investigated suicides by people aged ten to 19 in Newfoundland and Labrador from 1977 to 1988. It is the first study of suicide in the province to use the records of death from all eight hospital pathology departments in the province and from the office of the Chief Forensic Pathologist. Cases were selected for the study using standardized criteria, independent of the manner of death recorded on the death certificate. A suicide rate of 4.37 per 100,000 was found. This rate and the age- and sex-specific suicide rates are lower than the official figures for Canada but higher than those reported in earlier Newfoundland studies. The rate for males was nearly five times the female rate, and the rate for people aged 15 to 19 was nearly six times that of people aged ten to 14. Suicide rates for Labrador were higher than for the island portion of the province for both Native and for non Native adolescents. Extremely high rates of suicide were found only among the Native population living in Northern Labrador, while none were recorded for Native people elsewhere. Firearms accounted for 54% and hanging for 33% of all suicides. Thirty percent of suicides occurred on a Saturday. Only 36 of the 63 deaths included in this study were designated as suicide on death certificates. The higher rate of under-reporting of suicide than in other jurisdictions suggests that official rates may not be useful for comparisons. The reasons for the high rate of under-reporting are discussed.
PubMed ID
1933747 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' attitudes toward suicide, and a suicidal peer: a comparison between Swedish and Turkish high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68490
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1995 Jun;36(2):201-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
M. Eskin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1995 Jun;36(2):201-7
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Death
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Values
Students - psychology
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Turkey
Abstract
The present paper first presents the attitudes toward suicide and a suicidal classmate among 98 female and 69 male (N = 167) Swedish high school students. Secondly, the Swedish sample was compared with 167 (89 female and 78 male) Turkish high school students from a previous study. Among Swedish students, more males than females said that people have the right to commit suicide and suicide can be a solution to some problems. More females than males expressed a belief in life after death. Swedish adolescents were found to be holding more liberal attitudes toward suicide than Turkish adolescents. However, Turkish adolescents showed greater acceptance for a suicidal peer than Swedish adolescents. The results are discussed in terms of socio-cultural factors and related literature. The need for educational programs to provide basic knowledge about suicide and, effective ways of dealing with and helping suicidal peers is implicated.
PubMed ID
7644900 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide and suicide contagion in three secondary schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68342
Source
Int J Emerg Ment Health. 2001;3(3):163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
S. Poijula
K E Wahlberg
A. Dyregrov
Author Affiliation
Oy Synolon Ltd., Center for Trauma Psychology, Valtatie 16 as 11, 90500 Oulu, Finland. Soili.Poijula@netppl.fi
Source
Int J Emerg Ment Health. 2001;3(3):163-8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crisis Intervention - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Poisson Distribution
Psychotherapy, Brief
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study investigated crisis intervention in three secondary schools after the suicides of five students, focusing on the relation between crisis intervention and suicide contagion. The contagion hypothesis was supported. Following a suicide, the number of suicides that occurred in secondary schools in one year were markedly increased beyond chance. No new suicides took place at schools where adequate first talk-throughs and psychological debriefing were conducted by a mental health professional. Proper crisis intervention is recommended to prevent suicide contagion in schools.
PubMed ID
11642194 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide attempters: what predicts future suicidal acts?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79019
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2006 Dec;36(6):638-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Groholt Berit
Ekeberg Øivind
Haldorsen Tor
Author Affiliation
Sogn Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Oslo, Norway. berit.groholt@medisin.uio.no
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2006 Dec;36(6):638-50
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Father-Child Relations
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Norway
Recurrence - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Statistics
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Predictors for repetition of suicide attempts were evaluated among 92 adolescent suicide attempters 9 years after an index suicide attempt (90% females). Five were dead, two by suicide. Thirty-one (42%) of 73 had repeated a suicide attempt. In multiple Cox regression analysis, four factors had an independent predictive effect: comorbid disorders, hopelessness, having ever received treatment for mental or behavior problems, and having a father exerting control without affection. Prediction on an individual level was difficult. Since almost half repeated a suicidal act, the best strategy is to evaluate all adolescent suicide attempters thoroughly and provide treatment as needed.
PubMed ID
17250468 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use disorders increase the risk of completed suicide--irrespective of other psychiatric disorders. A longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89362
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2009 May 15;167(1-2):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2009
Author
Flensborg-Madsen Trine
Knop Joachim
Mortensen Erik Lykke
Becker Ulrik
Sher Leo
Grønbaek Morten
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Centre for Health and Society, and Department of Health Psychology, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. tfm@niph.dk
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2009 May 15;167(1-2):123-30
Date
May-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Knowledge of the epidemiology of suicide is a necessary prerequisite for developing prevention programs. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk of completed suicide among individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUD), and to assess the role of other psychiatric disorders in this association. A prospective cohort study was used, containing three updated sets of lifestyle covariates and 26 years follow-up of 18,146 individuals between 20 and 93 years of age from the Copenhagen City Heart Study in Denmark. The study population was linked to four different registers in order to detect: Completed suicide, AUD, Psychotic disorders, Anxiety disorders, Mood disorders, Personality disorders, Drug abuse, and Other psychiatric disorders. Individuals registered with AUD were at significantly increased risk of committing suicide, with a crude hazard ratio (HR) of 7.98 [Confidence interval (CI): 5.27-12.07] compared to individuals without AUD. Adjusting for all psychiatric disorders the risk fell to 3.23 (CI: 1.96-5.33). In the stratified sub-sample of individuals without psychiatric disorders, the risk of completed suicide was 9.69 (CI: 4.88-19.25) among individuals with AUD. The results indicate that individuals registered with AUD are at highly increased risk of completed suicide, and that registered co-morbid psychiatric disorders are neither sufficient nor necessary causes in this association.
PubMed ID
19359047 View in PubMed
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American Indian adolescent suicidal behavior in detention environments: cause for continued basic and applied research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3668
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res Monogr Ser. 1994;4:189-214; discussion 214-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994

[Analysis of suicidal situation among the service men on Kamchatka]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85881
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2008 Apr;329(4):9-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008

Antisocial behaviour in adolescent suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218671
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1994 Mar;89(3):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
M J Marttunen
H M Aro
M M Henriksson
J K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1994 Mar;89(3):167-73
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antisocial Personality Disorder - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Personality Assessment
Personality Development
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Social Adjustment
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Violence
Abstract
Antisocial behaviour among adolescent suicide victims (44 males, 9 females) was investigated in a nationwide psychological autopsy study of suicides in Finland. The data were collected through interviews of the victims' relatives and attending health care personnel, and from official records. Antisocial behaviour was reported among 43% of the victims. Separation from parents, parental alcohol abuse and parental violence were common among male victims with antisocial behaviour. Their psychosocial adjustment was poor, and they had experienced severe stressors. Depressive disorders were common among all suicides, but male victims with antisocial behaviour had more often alcohol abuse and comorbid mental disorders compared with victims without antisocial behaviour. The results indicate a strong relatedness between adolescent suicide and antisocial behaviour. Recognition and treatment of manifest mental symptoms and evaluation of suicide risk among adolescents with antisocial behaviour and substance abuse is emphasized. Antisocial symptoms with relatively short duration and not severe enough to meet the criteria for actual antisocial disorders also need to be taken into account.
PubMed ID
8178674 View in PubMed
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178 records – page 1 of 18.