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448 records – page 1 of 45.

A 5-year follow-up study of suicide attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46467
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E. Johnsson Fridell
A. Ojehagen
L. Träskman-Bendz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Cause of Death
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - mortality - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seventy-five patients were admitted to the ward of the Lund Suicide Research Center following a suicide attempt. After 5 years, the patients were followed up by a personal semistructured interview covering sociodemographic, psychosocial and psychiatric areas. Ten patients (13%) had committed suicide during the follow-up period, the majority within 2 years. They tended to be older at the index attempt admission, and most of them had a mood disorder in comparison with the others. Two patients had died from somatic diseases. Forty-two patients were interviewed, of whom 17 (40%) had reattempted during the follow-up period, most of them within 3 years. Predictors for reattempt were young age, personality disorder, parents having received treatment for psychiatric disorder, and a poor social network. At the index attempt, none of the reattempters had diagnoses of adjustment disorders or anxiety disorders. At follow-up, reattempters had more psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), and their overall functioning (GAF) was poor compared to those who did not reattempt. All of the reattempters had long-lasting treatment ( > 3 years) as compared to 56% of the others. It is of great clinical importance to focus on treatment strategies for the vulnerable subgroup of self-destructive reattempters.
PubMed ID
8739657 View in PubMed
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A 12-year National Study of Suicide by Jumping From Bridges in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293093
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Aleksandra Sæheim
Ingebjørg Hestetun
Erlend Mork
Latha Nrugham
Lars Mehlum
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies from several countries suggest that erecting fences on bridges more commonly used for suicide by jumping may be an effective way of reducing the risk of suicide by jumping from these bridges. Distribution of suicides by jumping off bridges has not yet been studied on a national level in any country. This study included all suicides by jumping from high places registered in the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry (COD) in the period 1999-2010 (n = 319). Combining data from the COD registry and information from police records, 71 cases of suicide by jumping off a bridge were identified involving 36 bridges. This form of suicide constituted approximately 1% of all suicides in Norway in the period 1999-2010. Almost half of these suicides were registered at only 6 bridges. Three Norwegian bridges were secured during the observation period of this study. Two bridges had barriers installed on the full length of the bridge with 11 suicides registered before barriers were installed, and none after. On the 1 bridge that was only partially secured, no change in numbers of suicides was observed after barriers were installed. One-third of jumps from bridges occurred over land. We found that although suicide by jumping off bridges was a relatively rare event, there is a potential for saving lives by installing physical barriers on bridges that are more commonly used for suicide by jumping.
PubMed ID
27309998 View in PubMed
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The 2009 Nobel conference on the role of genetics in promoting suicide prevention and the mental health of the population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98540
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2010 Jan;15(1):12-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
D. Wasserman
L. Terenius
J. Wasserman
M. Sokolowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, The National Prevention of Suicide and Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute (KI), Stockholm, Sweden. Danuta.Wasserman@ki.se
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2010 Jan;15(1):12-7
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses as topic
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Mental health
Nobel Prize
Population Groups
Suicide - prevention & control
Abstract
A 3-day Nobel Conference entitled 'The role of genetics in promoting suicide prevention and the mental health of the population' was held at the Nobel Forum, Karolinska Institute (KI) in Stockholm, Sweden, during 8-10 June 2009. The conference was sponsored by the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine and organized by the National Prevention for Suicide and Mental Ill-Health and the Center for Molecular Medicine at KI. The program consisted of 19 invited presentations, covering the genetic basis of mood/psychotic disorders and substance abuse in relation to suicide, with topics ranging from cellular-molecular mechanisms to (endo)phenotypes of mental disorders at the level of the individual and populations. Here, we provide an overview based on the highlights of what was presented.
PubMed ID
20029410 View in PubMed
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[About some perspective directions of suicide prophylaxis among the servicemen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164140
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2007 Jan;328(1):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007

[A center for research and prevention of suicide. Increased awareness of suicide is needed]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68523
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Mar 2;91(9):833-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2-1994
Author
D. Wasserman
Author Affiliation
Centrum för suicidforskning och -prevention, Samhällsmedicinska divisionen, Nordvästra sjukvårdsområdet, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Mar 2;91(9):833-5
Date
Mar-2-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Regional Medical Programs
Research
Suicide - prevention & control
Sweden
PubMed ID
8139352 View in PubMed
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[A crisis intervention service in an outpatient psychiatric clinic of a general hospital: function and clientele].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221532
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Mar;38(2):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
J P Fournier
F. Gagnon
Author Affiliation
Centre hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Ste-Foy, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Mar;38(2):96-100
Date
Mar-1993
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crisis Intervention
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Hospitals, General - utilization
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - utilization
Patient Care Team - utilization
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors describe an external crisis intervention service in a general hospital. This service is intended for a clientele presenting acute mental health problems, referred, in the majority of cases, from the emergency department. They present demographic data, diagnostic data, data on the factors precipitating the crises and data which can be used to qualify and quantify the clientele. In addition, they describe the therapeutic approach and the treatment philosophy, the number of follow-up sessions, and the guidance provided to the clientele after follow-up. Finally, the authors suggest prerequisites considered essential to the effective operation of a crisis intervention module in an external psychiatric clinic.
PubMed ID
8467450 View in PubMed
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Active multimodal psychotherapy in children and adolescents with suicidality: description, evaluation and clinical profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92095
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Högberg Goran
Hällström Tore
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. gor.hogberg@gmail.com
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Desensitization, Psychologic - methods
Eye Movements - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychodrama - methods
Psychotherapy - methods
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the clinical pattern of 14 youths with presenting suicidality, to describe an integrative treatment approach, and to estimate therapy effectiveness. Fourteen patients aged 10 to 18 years from a child and adolescent outpatient clinic in Stockholm were followed in a case series. The patients were treated with active multimodal psychotherapy. This consisted of mood charting by mood-maps, psycho-education, wellbeing practice and trauma resolution. Active techniques were psychodrama and body-mind focused techniques including eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. The patients were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment and at 22 months post treatment with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. The clinical pattern of the group was observed. After treatment there was a significant change towards normality in the Global Assessment of Functioning scale both immediately post-treatment and at 22 months. A clinical pattern, post trauma suicidal reaction, was observed with a combination of suicidality, insomnia, bodily symptoms and disturbed mood regulation. We conclude that in the post trauma reaction suicidality might be a presenting symptom in young people. Despite the shortcomings of a case series the results of this study suggest that a mood-map-based multimodal treatment approach with active techniques might be of value in the treatment of children and youth with suicidality.
PubMed ID
18783125 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Apr 19;127(8):1022
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2007

[Acute poisonings in Norway 1999-2004--morbidity and mortality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77921
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Apr 19;127(8):1023-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2007
Author
Lilleeng Grethe Helen Bøe
Berg Knut Joachim
Gjertsen Finn
Andrew Erik
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for giftinformasjon (Giftinformasjonen), Sosial- og helsedirektoratet, Postboks 7000 St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Apr 19;127(8):1023-7
Date
Apr-19-2007
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Cause of Death
Homicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Overdose
Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Psychotropic Drugs - poisoning
Registries
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Monitoring of acute poisoning is important for health authorities. There have been local studies and national studies in limited areas such as drug poisoning, but morbidity and mortality associated with acute poisoning has not been presented collectively at a national level. The aim of the study is to establish morbidity and mortality associated with acute poisoning in Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study material comprised data from the Norwegian Patient Register and the Norwegian Causes of Death Register on patients with acute poisoning from 1999 through 2004. Data from somatic hospitals include patients who were discharged after 5 hours. RESULTS: Almost 11,000 discharges with acute poisoning, coded as main or other condition (ICD-10 F and T codes), were recorded from somatic hospitals annually. The hospital mortality was 0.8 %. About 500 acute poisoning deaths occurred annually, 20 % within and 80 % of them outside hospitals. INTERPRETATION: The results show increased morbidity and stable mortality by acute poisoning in Norway, 1999-2004. Information in the Cause-of-Death and especially the Patient Register should be improved. More detailed information by type of drugs and substances and external causes are needed for monitoring and prevention.
PubMed ID
17457385 View in PubMed
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448 records – page 1 of 45.