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Patterns in sharp force fatalities--a comprehensive forensic medical study: Part 2. Suicidal sharp force injury in the Stockholm area 1972-1984.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12482
Source
J Forensic Sci. 1988 Mar;33(2):448-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
T. Karlsson
K. Ormstad
J. Rajs
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Sci. 1988 Mar;33(2):448-61
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Female
Finland - ethnology
Humans
Hungary - ethnology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Suicide - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Sweden
Wounds, Stab - ethnology - mortality - psychology
Abstract
A total of 89 cases of sharp force suicide that had been committed in the Stockholm area in Sweden from 1972 through 1984 were investigated. The series showed a male preponderance, sex ratio 3.3, and among males a shift towards the age group 40 to 49 years of age. An impact of cultural/ethnic factors was indicated by the overrepresentation of Finnish and Hungarian immigrants. A psychiatric diagnosis had been ascribed in 22 cases, and addiction to drugs or alcohol in 23. Previous attempts at self-destruction were recorded in 11 cases, only 1 of which was by sharp force. Classical indicators of suicidal intent, for example, suicide notes and the presence of hesitation injuries, were found in 28 and 80%, respectively. A preference for certain anatomical locations (throat, precordium, epigastrium, wrists) was confirmed as was the tendency to expose the skin before inflicting suicidal wounds. As compared to homicidal precordial stabs whose entrance wounds usually run vertically, horizontal or upwards/left-slanting stabs are strongly suggestive of suicide. Although cases were encountered where several "rules of thumb" concerning homicidal versus suicidal patterns were violated, our series contained no case of injuries to the backside of the trunk and no case of more than one wound piercing the left ventricle of the heart. Multiple chest wounds transecting costal or sternal bone were however not uncommon, and, along with the use of bizarre tools and objects like wood chisels or pieces of glass, illustrated the determination of suicidal intent. Toxicological analysis was positive for drugs in 22 and for alcohol in 27 cases. Blood alcohol levels were roughly similar to those found in victims of homicidal sharp force, whereas drug levels tended to be lower or higher in suicides.
PubMed ID
3373161 View in PubMed
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Suicides in Alaska: Firearms and alcohol

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3689
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1988 Feb;78(2):179-180
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
  1 website  
Author
Hlady, WG
Middaugh, JP
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska, Anchorage 99524-0249.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1988 Feb;78(2):179-180
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology
Female
Firearms
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Suicide - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
A manual review of death certificates and autopsy records identified 195 suicides in Alaska during 1983-84. Native males, 20-24 years old, had the highest rate of suicide (257 per 100,000 person-years). Gunshot wounds caused 76 per cent of all suicide deaths; 79 per cent of Native and 48 per cent of White suicides had detectable levels of blood alcohol. Suicide by firearms was weakly associated with blood alcohol levels above 100 mg/dl (odds ratio 1.3, 95 per cent confidence interval 1.11-1.47).
PubMed ID
3337334 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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