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The 2015 National Canadian Homeless Youth Survey: Mental Health and Addiction Findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291013
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Sean A Kidd
Stephen Gaetz
Bill O'Grady
Author Affiliation
1 Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Homeless Youth - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sexual and Gender Minorities - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study was designed to provide a representative description of the mental health of youth accessing homelessness services in Canada. It is the most extensive survey in this area to date and is intended to inform the development of mental health and addiction service and policy for this marginalized population.
This study reports mental health-related data from the 2015 "Leaving Home" national youth homelessness survey, which was administered through 57 agencies serving homeless youth in 42 communities across the country. This self-reported, point-in-time survey assessed a broad range of demographic information, pre-homelessness and homelessness variables, and mental health indicators.
Survey data were obtained from 1103 youth accessing Canadian homelessness services in the Nunavut territory and all Canadian provinces except for Prince Edward Island. Forty-two per cent of participants reported 1 or more suicide attempts, 85.4% fell in a high range of psychological distress, and key indicators of risk included an earlier age of the first episode of homelessness, female gender, and identifying as a sexual and/or gender minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and 2 spirit [LGBTQ2S]).
This study provides clear and compelling evidence of a need for mental health support for these youth, particularly LGBTQ2S youth and female youth. The mental health concerns observed here, however, must be considered in the light of the tremendous adversity in all social determinants faced by these youth, with population-level interventions best leveraged in prevention and rapid response.
Notes
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Cites: JAMA. 2004 Aug 4;292(5):569-74 PMID 15292082
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Cites: J Couns Psychol. 2010 Jul;57(3):274-89 PMID 21133579
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;46(7):617-21 PMID 11582822
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Oct 1;67(10 ):1083-1090 PMID 27247178
Cites: J Nurs Meas. 2009;17(2):105-13 PMID 19711709
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 May;92(5):773-7 PMID 11988446
PubMed ID
28372467 View in PubMed
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[A 15-year follow-up study after deliberate self-poisoning]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68428
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3065-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1997
Author
T. Rygnestad
Author Affiliation
Anestesiavdelingen Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3065-9
Date
Sep-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Prognosis
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The 15-year follow-up of mortality and the factors associated with death from various causes were studied in an unselected group of patients surviving deliberate self-poisoning in 1978. The cohort included 152 females and 101 males. By the end of 1993 a total of 37 (24%) of the females and 33 (33%) of the males admitted in 1978 had died. The total follow-up mortality was 4.5 times greater than expected for the female group (95% confidence interval: 3.1-6.1) and 3.6 times greater than expected (2.5-5.1) for the male group. It was highest in the first 5-year period. With regard to specific causes the mortality ratio was highest for deaths from suicide. For females it was 61.1 (30.5-109.4) and for males: 38.8 (20.4-65.4) times the expected ratio. It was also significantly raised for deaths from cardiovascular diseases in females: SMR = 3.7 (2.0-6.4) and from respiratory diseases in males: SMR = 3.3 (1.2-7.1). Significant predictors for death from all causes were age > or = 30 years: RR = 4.4 (2.3-8.5) and male sex: RR = 2.1 (1.2-3.5). Imprisonment was found to be a protective factor: RR = 0.2 (0.1-0.5). Predictors for death from suicide were age > or = 30: RR = 3.1 (1.2-8.1), male sex: RR = 3.3 (1.4-7.9) and a serious suicidal attempt, as evaluated by a psychiatrist: RR = 3.4 (1.4-7.9). It is concluded that patients who survive parasuicide by deliberate self-poisoning are at increased risk of death. The predictors for death are not very specific and are difficult to apply in clinical work with these patients.
PubMed ID
9381437 View in PubMed
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[Acute deliberate self-poisonings in the area of Trondheim, 1978-2002]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68265
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 4;124(21):2736-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2004
Author
Tarjei Rygnestad
Øystein Fagerhaug
Author Affiliation
Anestesiavdelingen, St. Olavs Hospital, 7006 Trondheim. tarjei.rygnestad@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 4;124(21):2736-9
Date
Nov-4-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Self-Injurious Behavior - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Deliberate self-poisoning is a big health problem. We wanted to study if there had been changes in drug use, morbidity and mortality in this group over the last 25 years in our hospital's catchment area. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this study, 924 patients admitted to our hospital after deliberate self-poisoning in 1978, 1987 and 2002 were studied prospectively. RESULTS: From 1978 to 1987, there was a significant increase in the incidence of self-poisoning followed by a decline from 1987 to 2002 among both men and women. The age distribution remained the same. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly used drugs during the whole period (20% of patients in 1978, 39% in 1987, and 30% in 2002). There has been a significant reduction in the use of acetylsalicylic acid, tricyclic antidepressants and a significant increase in paracetamol and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor poisonings. The use of gastric lavage and activated charcoal declined. The main antidote in 1978 was physostigmine, in 1987 and 2002 n-acetyl cysteine. During the whole period, complications (usually minor) were recorded in approximately 10% of cases. In 1978, mortality was 1.3%, in 1987 0.9%; no patient died in 2002. INTERPRETATION: The incidence of deliberate self-poisoning has fallen over the last 25 years. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have to a large extent replaced tricyclic antidepressants and paracetamol has replaced acetylsalicylic acid.
PubMed ID
15534662 View in PubMed
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[Acute nonfatal poisonings by drug preparations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226125
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1991 Jul-Sep;34(3):36-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M I Krut'
G N Zaraf'iants
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1991 Jul-Sep;34(3):36-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Factors
Drug Overdose - epidemiology - etiology
Forensic Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Poison Control Centers - statistics & numerical data
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Acute non-lethal poisonings with drugs within the period of 10 years according to archives data of Toxicological center and medicolegal department of victims' examination in Leningrad medicolegal expert Bureau were analysed. Number of drug poisoning cases increased two-fold and formed 76% of all poisoning cases. Tranquilizers, then antihistaminic, neuroleptic and hypotensive (clofelin) agents were used most often. Drugs were taken with suicidal attempt or with the aim of getting "alcoholic" effect. Poisonings among women were registered three times more often than among men.
PubMed ID
1836904 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acute poisonings among adults and adolescents in the year of 2000. Positive development--but alarming when it comes to narcotics and analgesics]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68226
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Oct 24-30;102(43):3125-9
Publication Type
Article

Acute poisonings in Iceland: a prospective nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86765
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Feb;46(2):126-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Kristinsson Jakob
Palsson Runolfur
Gudjonsdottir Gudborg A
Blondal Margret
Gudmundsson Sigurdur
Snook Curtis P
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Feb;46(2):126-32
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholic Beverages - poisoning
Child
Child, Preschool
Circadian Rhythm
Counseling - methods
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hazardous Substances - classification - poisoning
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Poison Control Centers - utilization
Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Poisoning is a common cause of emergency visits and hospital admission in Western countries. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and type of toxic exposures presenting to emergency medical facilities in Iceland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was prospective and included all patients with confirmed or suspected poisoning presenting to hospitals and rural medical centers providing emergency services in Iceland during the twelve-month period from April 2001 until March 2002. RESULTS: A total of 1,121 toxic exposures were documented representing an incidence of 3.91 cases per 1,000 inhabitants per year. The female to male ratio was 1.23. The majority of exposures (56.7%) occurred in the patient's home, 60% were deliberate, 72% had drugs and/or alcohol as their main cause, and 11% involved illicit drugs. Exposures to chemicals other than drugs were usually unintentional. CONCLUSION: Toxic exposures requiring emergency medical care are common in Iceland. Self-poisonings by ingestion of prescription drugs and/or alcohol accounted for the majority of cases.
PubMed ID
18259960 View in PubMed
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Acute poisonings treated in hospitals in Oslo: a one-year prospective study (I): pattern of poisoning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93790
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Jan;46(1):35-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Hovda K E
Bjornaas M A
Skog K.
Opdahl A.
Drottning P.
Ekeberg O.
Jacobsen D.
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. kehovda@yahoo.no
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Jan;46(1):35-41
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - poisoning
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Opioid - poisoning
Benzodiazepines - poisoning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydroxybutyrates - poisoning
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. Prospective design is mandatory to study pattern of poisoning and suicidal intention of patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Prospective cross-sectional multi-center study of all patients contacting health care services because of acute poisoning during one year in Oslo, irrespective of intention. Data on the adult hospitalized patients (> or = 16 years) are presented here. RESULTS. Of a total of 3,775 such adult contacts (3,025 episodes), there were 947 (31 %) hospitalizations; annual incidence 1.9 (per 1,000) in males and 2.1 in females. Median age was 36 years (range 16-89); 54% females. Benzodiazepines (18%), ethanol (17%), paracetamol (12%), opioids (7%), and gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) (7%) were most frequently taken. Patients stated suicidal intention in 29% of the admissions; physicians in 10%. CONCLUSION. Benzodiazepines and ethanol were the most common agents, but newer illicit drugs were frequent, especially GHB. Males often took ethanol and drugs of abuse; females often used prescription drugs with suicidal intention.
PubMed ID
18167035 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of childhood abuse and cannabis abuse on clinical expressions of bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261461
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
M. Aas
B. Etain
F. Bellivier
C. Henry
T. Lagerberg
A. Ringen
I. Agartz
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies of bipolar disorders indicate that childhood abuse and substance abuse are associated with the disorder. Whether both influence the clinical picture, or if one is mediating the association of the other, has not previously been investigated.
A total of 587 patients with bipolar disorders were recruited from Norway and France. A history of childhood abuse was obtained using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Diagnosis and clinical variables, including substance abuse, were based on structured clinical interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders or French version of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies).
Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with childhood abuse, specifically emotional and sexual abuse (? 2 = 8.63, p = 0.003 and ? 2 = 7.55, p = 0.006, respectively). Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with earlier onset of the illness (z = -4.17, p
PubMed ID
24028906 View in PubMed
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Admission of self-poisoned patients during one year at the Poisoning Treatment Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68557
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1993;371:38-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
B. Welcher
P. Rubin
M. Nordentoft
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1993;371:38-44
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Prospective Studies
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study comprises 541 patients admitted to the Poisoning Treatment Centre at Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen; 440 of the patients were psychiatrically evaluated prospectively. The sex distribution was almost equal. In comparison with the normal population there was an overrepresentation of the age groups of 30-49 years old and of 18-19 years old. Only 20% were employed. Sixty-nine percent of the males and 40% of the females were living alone. Forty-six percent of the patients had some sort of abuse. Twenty-one percent suffered from psychotic disorder. Forty-eight percent had at least once before attempted suicide. The group was found to be at high risk of repeating suicide attempt according to a scale developed in the poisoning treatment centre in Edinburgh. The treatment of suicidal patients is discussed.
PubMed ID
8517182 View in PubMed
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199 records – page 1 of 20.