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A 20-year study of an adolescent psychiatric clientele, with special reference to the age of onset.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31748
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Pedersen
T. Aarkrog
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Centralsygehuset i Holbaek, Gl. Ringstedvej 1, DK-4300 Holbaek, Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):5-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia, Childhood - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
During a period of 20 years (1968-1988) all inpatients admitted for the first time to the adolescent psychiatric unit in Copenhagen (n = 841) were classified in accordance with social and psychiatric variables, to describe the clientele as a group and, furthermore, to investigate changes occurring during that period. The total clientele had a broad age range (12-21 years), with as many as 36% less than 15 years old. Eleven percent of the patients had attempted suicide before admission. Fifty-six percent of the total group were diagnosed as psychotic or as borderline cases. The patients came predominantly from lower social levels, and almost half the group had a child debut defined as symptoms that had resulted in referral for further investigation during childhood. Moreover, among the schizophrenic patients 35% had an early onset. The age of onset may have some clinical significance, as this item was related to several sociodemographic variables. Finally, an increase in the rate of psychoses and lower social class was recorded during the period.
PubMed ID
11827600 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3070-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1997
Author
N. Bratberg
Author Affiliation
Akutt-og allmennpsykiatrisk avdeling Sanderud sykehus, Ottestad.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3070-2
Date
Sep-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the admission of suicidal patients to a psychiatric hospital. Patients admitted to the emergency and intermediate departments of Sanderud psychiatric hospital in 1991 were included in the study. 39% of the admissions were suicidal patients. Comparison was made between patients who had recently attempted suicide and those who had not. Those who had recently attempted suicide spent a slightly shorter time in hospital than those who had not. The patients who were admitted, tended to be younger than those who actually committed suicide. The average time spent in hospital was not so short that there was evidence of a "revolving door psychiatry" despite there being many short-term stays.
PubMed ID
9381438 View in PubMed
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Adolescent care. Part 2: communication and referral practices of family physicians caring for adolescents with mental health problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165305
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Nov;52(11):1442-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Brigitte Maheux
Andrée Gilbert
Nancy Haley
Jean-Yves Frappier
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. brigitte.maheux@umontreal.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Nov;52(11):1442-3
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Communication
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family
Private Practice
Professional-Family Relations
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To document with whom family physicians communicate when evaluating adolescents with mental health problems, to whom they refer these adolescents, and their knowledge and perceptions of the accessibility of mental health services in their communities.
Mailed survey completed anonymously.
Province of Quebec.
All general practitioners who reported seeing at least 10 adolescents weekly (n = 255) among 707 physicians who participated in a larger survey on adolescent mental health care in general practice.
Whether family physicians communicated with people (such as parents, teachers, or school nurses) when evaluating adolescents with mental health problems. Number of adolescents referred to mental health services during the last year. Knowledge of mental health services in the community and perception of their accessibility.
When asked about the last 5 adolescents seen with symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts, depending on type of practice, 9% to 19% of physicians reported routinely communicating with parents, and 22% to 32% reported not contacting parents. Between 16% and 43% of physicians referred 5 adolescents or fewer to mental health services during a 12-month period. Most practitioners reported being adequately informed about the mental health services available in their local community clinics. Few physicians knew about services offered by private-practice psychologists, child psychiatrists, or community groups. Respondents perceived mental health services in community clinics (CLSCs) as the most accessible and child psychiatrists as the least accessible services.
Few physicians routinely contact parents when evaluating adolescents with serious mental health problems. Collaboration between family physicians and mental health professionals could be improved. The few referrals made to mental health professionals might indicate barriers to mental health services that could mean many adolescents do not receive the care they need. The lack of access to mental health services, notably to child psychiatrists, reported by most respondents could explain why some physicians choose not to refer adolescents.
Notes
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Cites: Adolescence. 1994 Summer;29(114):379-888085488
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PubMed ID
17279203 View in PubMed
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Adult reports of child and adult attributions of blame for childhood sexual abuse: predicting adult adjustment and suicidal behaviors in females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192431
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2001 Oct;25(10):1329-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
S L Barker-Collo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2001 Oct;25(10):1329-41
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Memory
Mental health
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Rationalization
Self Concept
Self Disclosure
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine whether reports made by adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse about attributions of blame made during childhood and adulthood are predictive of overall adulthood symptomatology and presence of suicide attempts.
126 female survivors of childhood sexual abuse completed anonymous survey packages which included a modified version of the Attributional Style Questionnaire, the Trauma Symptom Checklist-40, and questions regarding demographics and abuse characteristics.
The study revealed that participants reporting abuse by an immediate family member and abuse before 10 years of age tended to report having made internal attributions of blame when they were children. In addition, reports of internal attributions of blame made during childhood were significantly predictive of overall adulthood symptomatology, as well as presence of suicide attempts. Reported adulthood attributions did not contribute to prediction.
The clinical implications of further evidence of the link between attributions and outcome following childhood sexual abuse including the need for identification and intervention to address internal attributions made during childhood are discussed.
PubMed ID
11720382 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences among women prisoners: relationships to suicide attempts and drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256618
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Christine Friestad
Rustad Åse-Bente
Ellen Kjelsberg
Author Affiliation
1Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Life Change Events
Likelihood Functions
Norway
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Statistics as Topic
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Women prisoners are known to suffer from an accumulation of factors known to increase the risk for several major health problems. This study examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and the relationship between such experiences and suicide attempts and drug use among incarcerated women in Norway.
A total of 141 women inmates (75% of all eligible) were interviewed using a structured interview guide covering information on demographics and a range of ACE related to abuse and neglect, and household dysfunction. The main outcome variables were attempted suicide and adult drug abuse.
Emotional, physical and sexual abuse during childhood was experienced by 39%, 36% and 19%, respectively, and emotional and physical neglect by 31% and 33%, respectively. Looking at the full range of ACE, 17% reported having experienced none, while 34% reported having experienced more than five ACEs. After controlling for age, immigrant background and marital status, the number of ACEs significantly increased the risk of attempted suicide and current drug abuse.
The associations observed between early life trauma and later health risk behaviour indicate the need for early prevention. The findings also emphasize the important role of prison health services in secondary prevention among women inmates.
PubMed ID
23045353 View in PubMed
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Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287299
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M. Aas
C. Henry
F. Bellivier
M. Lajnef
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
T V Lagerberg
S R Aminoff
T. Bjella
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
B. Etain
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD.
A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro.
Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset.
Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.
PubMed ID
27894372 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use disorder in elderly suicide attempters: a comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116972
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;21(2):196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Johanna Morin
Stefan Wiktorsson
Thomas Marlow
Pernille J Olesen
Ingmar Skoog
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. morin.johanna@gmail.com
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;21(2):196-203
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
To compare lifetime prevalence of alcohol use disorder (AUD) in older adults who were hospitalized in connection with a suicide attempt and in a population comparison group, as well as to compare previous suicidal behavior in attempters with and without AUD.
Case-comparison.
Five hospitals in Western Sweden.
Persons 70 years or older, who were treated in a hospital because of a suicide attempt during 2003-2006 were recruited. Of 133 eligible participants, 103 participants were enrolled (47 men, 56 women, mean age 80 years, response rate 77%). Four comparison subjects per case were randomly selected among participants in our late-life population studies.
Lifetime history of AUD in accordance with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, was discerned on the basis of interview data, case record review, and the hospital discharge register. Depression symptoms were rated using the Montgomery-?sberg Rating Scale.
AUD was observed in 26% of the cases and in 4% of the comparison group (odds ratio [OR]: 10.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.9-22.5). Associations were noted in men (OR: 9.5; 95% CI: 4.0-22.8) and women (OR: 12.0; 95% CI: 2.4-59.5). More than half of the cases with AUD and?a third of those without AUD had made at least one prior suicide attempt. In these, AUD was associated with a longer interval between the first attempt and the index attempt.
A strong association between AUD and hospital-treated suicide attempts was noted in both sexes in this northern European setting. Given the high rates of suicide worldwide in this fast-growing and vulnerable group, comparison studies in other settings are needed.
PubMed ID
23343493 View in PubMed
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Ante- and perinatal circumstances and risk of attempted suicides and suicides in offspring: the Northern Finland birth cohort 1966 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127072
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Antti Alaräisänen
Jouko Miettunen
Anneli Pouta
Matti Isohanni
Pirkko Räsänen
Pirjo Mäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. antti.alaraisanen@oulu.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Single Parent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Physiological
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate those ante- and perinatal circumstances preceding suicide attempts and suicides, which have so far not been studied intensively.
Examination of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 10,742), originally based on antenatal questionnaire data and now followed up from mid-pregnancy to age 39, to ascertain psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring and suicides or attempted suicides in the offspring using nationwide registers.
A total of 121 suicide attempts (57 males) and 69 suicides (56 males) had occurred. Previously unstudied antenatal factors (maternal depressed mood and smoking, unwanted pregnancy) were not related to these after adjustment. Psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring were the risk factors in both genders. When adjusted for these, the statistically significant risk factors among males were a single-parent family for suicide attempts (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.62-8.50) and grand multiparity for suicides (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.15-6.18). When a psychiatric disorder in females was included among possible risk factors for suicide attempts, it alone remained significant (OR 15.55, 8.78-27.53).
A single-parent family was a risk factor for attempted suicides and grand multiparity for suicides in male offspring even after adjusting for other ante- and perinatal circumstances and mental disorders in the parents and offspring. Mothers' antenatal depressed mood and smoking and unwanted pregnancy did not increase the risk of suicide, which is a novel finding.
PubMed ID
22327374 View in PubMed
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Antidepressants and the risk of suicide, attempted suicide, and overall mortality in a nationwide cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166258
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;63(12):1358-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Jari.Tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;63(12):1358-67
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Child
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
It is unknown if antidepressant treatment is associated with either increased or decreased risk of suicide.
To estimate the risk of suicide, attempted suicide, and overall mortality during antidepressant treatments in a real-life setting with high statistical power.
A cohort study in which all subjects without psychosis, hospitalized because of a suicide attempt from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2003, in Finland, were followed up through a nationwide computerized database.
A total of 15 390 patients with a mean follow-up of 3.4 years.
The propensity score-adjusted relative risks (RRs) during monotherapy with the most frequently used antidepressants compared with no antidepressant treatment.
In the entire cohort, fluoxetine use was associated with the lowest risk (RR, 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.93), and venlafaxine hydrochloride use with the highest risk (RR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.01-2.57), of suicide. A substantially lower mortality was observed during selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71; P
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2007 Aug;10(3):9017652572
PubMed ID
17146010 View in PubMed
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Anxiety disorders associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in the National Comorbidity Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174119
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2005 Jul;193(7):450-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Jitender Sareen
Tanya Houlahan
Brian J Cox
Gordon J G Asmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2005 Jul;193(7):450-4
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Suicide - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between anxiety disorders and suicidal ideation or suicide attempts in a nationally representative sample (N = 5877; age, 15-54; response rate, 82.4%). A modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to make DSM-III-R mental disorder diagnoses. Two multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed with suicidal ideation (N = 754) and suicide attempts (N = 259) as dependent variables. In each regression, the independent variables entered were lifetime social phobia, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, simple phobia, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Covariates in the analyses were sociodemographics, lifetime mood disorders, substance use disorders, nonaffective psychosis, antisocial personality disorder, and presence of three or more lifetime DSM-III-R diagnoses. PTSD was significantly associated with suicidal ideation (adjusted odds ratio = 2.79; p
PubMed ID
15985839 View in PubMed
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204 records – page 1 of 21.