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204 records – page 1 of 21.

Grief and loss among Eskimos attempting suicide in western Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3666
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Dec;151(12):1815-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
R J Gregory
Author Affiliation
Community Mental Health, Norton Sound Regional Hospital, Nome, Alaska.
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Dec;151(12):1815-6
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Female
Grief
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Data were collected prospectively from psychiatric evaluations performed on 53 consecutive Eskimos in the Bering Strait region who attempted suicide. Depressive diagnoses were common (N = 49). Thirty-seven (70%) of the attempts were preceded by a recent interpersonal loss. Sixty percent of the patients had lost a parent during childhood. Poor affective relatedness, especially around issues of loss, was noted in most of the patients. Thus, both multiple losses and limited grieving mechanisms may be important risk factors for attempted suicide in this population.
PubMed ID
7977892 View in PubMed
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Suicidal ideation among Canadian youth: a multivariate analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156507
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2008;12(3):263-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Tracey Peter
Lance W Roberts
Raluca Buzdugan
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada. Tracey-Peter@UManitob.ca
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2008;12(3):263-75
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Psychology
Risk factors
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A multivariate model was developed incorporating various socio-demographic, social-environmental, and social-psychological factors in an attempt to predict suicidal ideation among Canadian youth. The main research objective sought to determine what socially based factors elevate or reduce suicidal ideation within this population. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth-Cycle 5 (2003), a cross-sectional sample of 1,032 was used to empirically identify various social determinants of suicidal ideation among youth between the ages of 12 and 15. Results reveal statistically significant correlations between suicide ideation and some lesser examined socially based measures. In particular, ability to communicate feelings, negative attachment to parents/guardians, taunting/bullying or abuse, and presence of deviant peers were significant predictors of suicidal ideation. As expected, depression/anxiety, gender, and age were also correlated with thoughts of suicide. Research findings should help foster a better understanding toward the social elements of suicide and provide insight into how suicide prevention strategies may be improved through an increased emphasis on substance use education, direct targeting of dysfunctional families and deviant peer groups, and exploring more avenues of self-expression for youth.
PubMed ID
18576207 View in PubMed
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[Attempted suicide among Norwegian soldiers. A retrospective study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12061
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Feb 20;111(5):565-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1991
Author
L. Mehlum
Author Affiliation
Forsvarets sanitet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Feb 20;111(5):565-8
Date
Feb-20-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Military Personnel - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
Suicidal behaviour is a rapidly increasing health problem among young men, and represents a major challenge to the Armed Forces. A retrospective investigation of suicide attempts among male conscripts showed that even though the overall incidence is lower than in civilian settings it is high among the basic trainees. The suicide-attempting soldier often has a troublesome background, with psychiatric disorders and drug or alcohol abuse. Many have personality disorders, and a subgroup displays repeated self-destructive behaviour. Most soldiers employ less life-threatening self-destructive methods and attempt the suicide on military premises. Many are influenced by alcohol. Following the suicide attempt most soldiers are quickly discharged from service. The paper discusses various aspects of self-destructive behaviour among soldiers and possible preventive measures.
PubMed ID
2008669 View in PubMed
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Community structural instability, anomie, imitation and adolescent suicidal behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92560
Source
J Adolesc. 2009 Apr;32(2):233-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Thorlindsson Thorolfur
Bernburg Jón Gunnar
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Iceland, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. thorotho@hi.is
Source
J Adolesc. 2009 Apr;32(2):233-45
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anomie
Female
Humans
Imitative Behavior
Linear Models
Male
Questionnaires
Social Behavior
Social Environment
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The current study examines the contextual effects of community structural characteristics, as well as the mediating role of key social mechanisms, on youth suicidal behavior in Iceland. We argue that the contextual influence of community structural instability on youth suicidal behavior should be mediated by weak attachment to social norms and values (anomie), and contact with suicidal others (suggestion-imitation). The data comes from a national survey of 14-16 years old adolescents. Valid questionnaires were obtained from 7018 students (response rate about 87%). The findings show that the community level of residential mobility has a positive, contextual effect on adolescent suicidal behavior. The findings also indicate that the contextual effect of residential mobility is mediated by both anomie and suggestion-imitation. The findings offer the possibility to identify communities that carry a substantial risk for adolescent suicide as well as the mechanisms that mediate the influence of community structural characteristics on adolescent risk behavior.
PubMed ID
18692236 View in PubMed
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Determinants of attempted suicide in urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187283
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(6):451-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Aini Ostamo
Eero Lahelma
Jouko Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(6):451-6
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper investigates, first, the differences in attempted-suicide rates among men and women between urban districts and, second, the association between regional characteristics and attempted-suicide rates. The data cover all attempted suicides referred to healthcare in 1989 and 1997 in Helsinki, Finland. There are clear and persistent differences in the attempted-suicide rates between the studied districts. Although female rates increased in all seven districts from 1989 to 1997, their mutual relationships remain similar. There are more changes among men both within and between the districts. Socio-economic disadvantage within the districts was associated with higher attempted-suicide rates. We conclude that socio-economic characteristics and their changes over time in the districts are likely to affect the suicidal behaviour of men more than women. Improving the employment status and structural position, especially of men, would probably prove to be important for the prevention of attempted suicide.
PubMed ID
12495541 View in PubMed
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[A study of suicidal tendencies in adolescents in the secondary level].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229223
Source
Sante Ment Que. 1990 May;15(1):29-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
L. Coté
J. Pronovost
C. Ross
Source
Sante Ment Que. 1990 May;15(1):29-45
Date
May-1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Educational Status
Family - psychology
Fathers
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Quebec
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A study carried out among 2,850 Québec adolescents, aged 12 to 18 and coming from four high schools in the Trois-Rivières area, shows that 15.4% of them admit to having seriously thought of committing suicide. These teenagers are at different stages of the suicidal process. Hence, 4% admit to nurturing serious thoughts about suicide: 7.9% say they are at the planning stages and 3.5% have actually attempted suicide. The characteristics of the families involved are fairly the same for all categories of suicidal tendencies. However, the fathers of the youth who have made attempts have less schooling than the father of the other teens with suicidal tendencies. Furthermore, the adolescents who have attempted suicide report a greater number of events that are key to their suicidal thoughts. The persistence of suicidal thoughts, the depressive state, the feelings of an existential void and the despair all grow in function of the seriousness of suicidal tendencies. These affective-type variables best distinguish the different categories of suicidal tendencies.
PubMed ID
2096976 View in PubMed
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[Suicidal thoughts and suicidal attempts among 15-24 years old individuals in the Danish educational system]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68469
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Sep 2;158(36):5026-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-1996
Author
G. Jessen
K. Andersen
U. Bille-Brahe
Author Affiliation
Center for selvmordsforskning, Odense.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Sep 2;158(36):5026-9
Date
Sep-2-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Students
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of the study is by the instrumentality of an anonymous and voluntary interview study to expose the extent of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among 15-24-year-olds in the Danish educational system. 3042 persons participated in the study. About 40% of those interviewed had at least once had suicidal ideation and almost one in every twenty confirmed that they had attempted to commit suicide. Furthermore, the study showed that almost one in every ten had experienced suicide in the family. The study showed that frequent or chronical suicidal ideation and self-destructive behaviour can be considered risk factors of suicide attempts and possible predictors of future suicidal behaviour. It also appeared that the students who had experienced suicide in the family had a risk of committing suicide that was three times as high as that of the students who had not experienced suicide in the family. The results of the study also suggest that it is probably only the tip of the iceberg which is detected or registered by the treatment system. To all appearance, close on 75-90% of young suicide attempts are not registered officially. This bears witness of the fact that many of these 15-24-year-olds apparently received no help after their suicide attempt.
PubMed ID
8928242 View in PubMed
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Physical stature and method-specific attempted suicide: cohort study of one million men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100531
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2010 Aug 30;179(1):116-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2010
Author
Elise Whitley
Finn Rasmussen
Per Tynelius
G David Batty
Author Affiliation
Medical Research Council Social & Public Health Sciences Unit, Glasgow, UK.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2010 Aug 30;179(1):116-8
Date
Aug-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Height
Cohort Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Adult height, a marker of early-life environment, has been sporadically associated with suicide risk. We have examined adult height and attempted suicide risk in a cohort of 1,102,293 Swedish men and, in fully-adjusted analyses, found decreasing stepwise associations between height and attempted suicides by any means and most specific means.
PubMed ID
20627206 View in PubMed
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The association between pathological gambling and attempted suicide: findings from a national survey in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160704
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;52(9):605-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Stephen C Newman
Angus H Thompson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Mackenzie Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton. stephen.newman@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;52(9):605-12
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Impulse Control Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine the association between pathological gambling (PG) and attempted suicide in a nationally representative sample of Canadians.
Data came from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2, conducted in 2002, in which 36 984 subjects, aged 15 years or older, were interviewed. Logistic regression was performed with attempted suicide (in the past year) as the dependent variable. The independent variables were PG, major depression, alcohol dependence, drug dependence, and mental health care (in the past year), as well as a range of sociodemographic variables. Survey weights and bootstrap methods were used to account for the complex survey design.
In the final logistic regression model, which included terms for PG, major depression, alcohol dependence, and mental health care, as well as age, sex, education, and income, the odds ratio for PG and attempted suicide was 3.43 (95% confidence interval, 1.37 to 8.60).
PG (in the past year) and attempted suicide (in the past year) are associated in a nationally representative sample of Canadians. However, it is not possible to say from these data whether this represents a causal relation.
PubMed ID
17953165 View in PubMed
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204 records – page 1 of 21.