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322 records – page 1 of 33.

5-HT2C receptor and MAO-A interaction analysis: no association with suicidal behaviour in bipolar patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157011
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Vincenzo De Luca
Subi Tharmaligam
John Strauss
James L Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250 College Street, R-30, Toronto (ON), Canada M5T 1R8. vincenzo_deluca@camh.net
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - genetics - psychology
Canada
Family Health
Female
Gene Frequency
Genes, X-Linked
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monoamine Oxidase - genetics
Nuclear Family
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2C - genetics
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The serotonin 2C (HTR2C) receptor has been implicated in suicide-related behaviours, however there are not many studies to date about HTR2C and suicidality. We studied HTR2C haplotypes in suicide attempters, where our sample composed of 306 families with at least one member affected by bipolar disorder. HTR2C (Cys23Ser and a common STR in the promoter) variants were analyzed with respect to attempter status and the severity of suicidal behaviour. The X-linked haplotype analysis in relation to suicide attempt did not reveal any significant association. Furthermore, we performed a particular gene-gene interaction for the X-linked serotonergic genes (HTR2C and MAOA), and found no association among this intergenic haplotype combination and suicidal behaviour in bipolar disorder.
PubMed ID
18504633 View in PubMed
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A 20-year study of an adolescent psychiatric clientele, with special reference to the age of onset.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31748
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Pedersen
T. Aarkrog
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Centralsygehuset i Holbaek, Gl. Ringstedvej 1, DK-4300 Holbaek, Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):5-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia, Childhood - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
During a period of 20 years (1968-1988) all inpatients admitted for the first time to the adolescent psychiatric unit in Copenhagen (n = 841) were classified in accordance with social and psychiatric variables, to describe the clientele as a group and, furthermore, to investigate changes occurring during that period. The total clientele had a broad age range (12-21 years), with as many as 36% less than 15 years old. Eleven percent of the patients had attempted suicide before admission. Fifty-six percent of the total group were diagnosed as psychotic or as borderline cases. The patients came predominantly from lower social levels, and almost half the group had a child debut defined as symptoms that had resulted in referral for further investigation during childhood. Moreover, among the schizophrenic patients 35% had an early onset. The age of onset may have some clinical significance, as this item was related to several sociodemographic variables. Finally, an increase in the rate of psychoses and lower social class was recorded during the period.
PubMed ID
11827600 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3070-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1997
Author
N. Bratberg
Author Affiliation
Akutt-og allmennpsykiatrisk avdeling Sanderud sykehus, Ottestad.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3070-2
Date
Sep-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the admission of suicidal patients to a psychiatric hospital. Patients admitted to the emergency and intermediate departments of Sanderud psychiatric hospital in 1991 were included in the study. 39% of the admissions were suicidal patients. Comparison was made between patients who had recently attempted suicide and those who had not. Those who had recently attempted suicide spent a slightly shorter time in hospital than those who had not. The patients who were admitted, tended to be younger than those who actually committed suicide. The average time spent in hospital was not so short that there was evidence of a "revolving door psychiatry" despite there being many short-term stays.
PubMed ID
9381438 View in PubMed
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Adolescent care. Part 2: communication and referral practices of family physicians caring for adolescents with mental health problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165305
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Nov;52(11):1442-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Brigitte Maheux
Andrée Gilbert
Nancy Haley
Jean-Yves Frappier
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. brigitte.maheux@umontreal.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Nov;52(11):1442-3
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Communication
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family
Private Practice
Professional-Family Relations
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To document with whom family physicians communicate when evaluating adolescents with mental health problems, to whom they refer these adolescents, and their knowledge and perceptions of the accessibility of mental health services in their communities.
Mailed survey completed anonymously.
Province of Quebec.
All general practitioners who reported seeing at least 10 adolescents weekly (n = 255) among 707 physicians who participated in a larger survey on adolescent mental health care in general practice.
Whether family physicians communicated with people (such as parents, teachers, or school nurses) when evaluating adolescents with mental health problems. Number of adolescents referred to mental health services during the last year. Knowledge of mental health services in the community and perception of their accessibility.
When asked about the last 5 adolescents seen with symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts, depending on type of practice, 9% to 19% of physicians reported routinely communicating with parents, and 22% to 32% reported not contacting parents. Between 16% and 43% of physicians referred 5 adolescents or fewer to mental health services during a 12-month period. Most practitioners reported being adequately informed about the mental health services available in their local community clinics. Few physicians knew about services offered by private-practice psychologists, child psychiatrists, or community groups. Respondents perceived mental health services in community clinics (CLSCs) as the most accessible and child psychiatrists as the least accessible services.
Few physicians routinely contact parents when evaluating adolescents with serious mental health problems. Collaboration between family physicians and mental health professionals could be improved. The few referrals made to mental health professionals might indicate barriers to mental health services that could mean many adolescents do not receive the care they need. The lack of access to mental health services, notably to child psychiatrists, reported by most respondents could explain why some physicians choose not to refer adolescents.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17279203 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide attempts 1973-1982 in the Helsinki area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234643
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1987 Oct;76(4):346-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1987
Author
L. Kotila
J. Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1987 Oct;76(4):346-54
Date
Oct-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental health
Motivation
Social Class
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Abstract
Four hundred and twenty-two adolescent suicide attempts were examined. The intent to die was weaker than in adult persons. Within lethality no difference was found. Adolescents came mostly from the lowest social classes and their educational status was low. Their mental health was often unsatisfactory. The psychiatric treatment, which was arranged after the suicide attempt, was not more intensive than that arranged for adult suicide attempters.
PubMed ID
3425360 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide attempts in Bærum, Norway, 1984-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138824
Source
Crisis. 2010;31(5):255-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Gudrun Dieserud
Ragnhild M Gerhardsen
Hanne Van den Weghe
Karina Corbett
Author Affiliation
Department of Suicide Research and Prevention, Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. gudi@fhi.no
Source
Crisis. 2010;31(5):255-64
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Conflict (Psychology)
Family - psychology
Female
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - trends
Population Surveillance
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Suburban Population - trends
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - trends
Abstract
There are presently few international studies that examine adolescents' own experience of both triggering and the underlying reasons behind their suicide attempts.
To present the rates, triggering factors, and underlying reasons for such behavior.
The 23-year (1984-2006) surveillance study reported includes all general hospital-treated suicide attempters aged between 13 and 19 years (n = 254) living in the municipality of Bærum, a suburb on the outskirts of Oslo, Norway.
Suicide attempt rates for both sexes decreased during the period of study. The female suicide attempt rate was on average 3.5 times higher than the male rate. An average of 8.2% of the suicide attempters made a repeat attempt within the following year. Overall, the most commonly reported trigger was a relational conflict (50.2%), and the most commonly reported underlying reason was a dysfunctional family situation (43.6%), followed by mental health problems (22.8%). The main gender difference for both triggers and underlying reasons was that relational conflicts were reported significantly more often by girls than by boys as triggers (55.0% versus 32.7%), and dysfunctional family issues were reported significantly more often by girls than by boys (47.1% versus 30.8%) as underlying reasons for the attempt. Mental health problems were reported less frequently as an underlying reason by girls than boys (21.2% versus 28.8%).
A family-oriented intervention embracing the extended family system seems warranted in a majority of the cases in our study.
PubMed ID
21134845 View in PubMed
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Adult reports of child and adult attributions of blame for childhood sexual abuse: predicting adult adjustment and suicidal behaviors in females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192431
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2001 Oct;25(10):1329-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
S L Barker-Collo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2001 Oct;25(10):1329-41
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Memory
Mental health
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Rationalization
Self Concept
Self Disclosure
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine whether reports made by adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse about attributions of blame made during childhood and adulthood are predictive of overall adulthood symptomatology and presence of suicide attempts.
126 female survivors of childhood sexual abuse completed anonymous survey packages which included a modified version of the Attributional Style Questionnaire, the Trauma Symptom Checklist-40, and questions regarding demographics and abuse characteristics.
The study revealed that participants reporting abuse by an immediate family member and abuse before 10 years of age tended to report having made internal attributions of blame when they were children. In addition, reports of internal attributions of blame made during childhood were significantly predictive of overall adulthood symptomatology, as well as presence of suicide attempts. Reported adulthood attributions did not contribute to prediction.
The clinical implications of further evidence of the link between attributions and outcome following childhood sexual abuse including the need for identification and intervention to address internal attributions made during childhood are discussed.
PubMed ID
11720382 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences among women prisoners: relationships to suicide attempts and drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256618
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Christine Friestad
Rustad Åse-Bente
Ellen Kjelsberg
Author Affiliation
1Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Life Change Events
Likelihood Functions
Norway
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Statistics as Topic
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Women prisoners are known to suffer from an accumulation of factors known to increase the risk for several major health problems. This study examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and the relationship between such experiences and suicide attempts and drug use among incarcerated women in Norway.
A total of 141 women inmates (75% of all eligible) were interviewed using a structured interview guide covering information on demographics and a range of ACE related to abuse and neglect, and household dysfunction. The main outcome variables were attempted suicide and adult drug abuse.
Emotional, physical and sexual abuse during childhood was experienced by 39%, 36% and 19%, respectively, and emotional and physical neglect by 31% and 33%, respectively. Looking at the full range of ACE, 17% reported having experienced none, while 34% reported having experienced more than five ACEs. After controlling for age, immigrant background and marital status, the number of ACEs significantly increased the risk of attempted suicide and current drug abuse.
The associations observed between early life trauma and later health risk behaviour indicate the need for early prevention. The findings also emphasize the important role of prison health services in secondary prevention among women inmates.
PubMed ID
23045353 View in PubMed
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Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287299
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M. Aas
C. Henry
F. Bellivier
M. Lajnef
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
T V Lagerberg
S R Aminoff
T. Bjella
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
B. Etain
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD.
A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro.
Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset.
Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.
PubMed ID
27894372 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intoxication and psychosocial problems among children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229143
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 May;81(5):468-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
A. Lamminpää
J. Vilska
Author Affiliation
Poison Control Center, Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 May;81(5):468-71
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Motivation
Parent-Child Relations
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Class
Social Environment
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Abstract
A drunken child is a common sight in the streets during weekends in Finland. An early episode of drunkenness may be an early sign of a serious tendency, or it may be an isolated incident. In this study 300 alcohol intoxications treated in hospital were examined. The underlying risk factors of the patients, their motives for drinking and their symptoms and signs were recorded. Underlying family problems were usual; in 45% of the cases the family was broken, in 36% the family had visited child guidance clinics, and in 31% of the families one parent was an alcoholic. The lower the mother's social group was, the higher the frequency of alcohol intoxication. Previous intoxications were reported in 9% of the cases. Most of the children's intoxications were experimental (49%); suicidal cases amounted to 8% and cases in which the child had been forced to drink amounted to 6%, and the rest of the patients belonged to the problem group and the mixed-motives group.
PubMed ID
2356771 View in PubMed
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322 records – page 1 of 33.