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A 5-year follow-up study of suicide attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46467
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E. Johnsson Fridell
A. Ojehagen
L. Träskman-Bendz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Cause of Death
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - mortality - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seventy-five patients were admitted to the ward of the Lund Suicide Research Center following a suicide attempt. After 5 years, the patients were followed up by a personal semistructured interview covering sociodemographic, psychosocial and psychiatric areas. Ten patients (13%) had committed suicide during the follow-up period, the majority within 2 years. They tended to be older at the index attempt admission, and most of them had a mood disorder in comparison with the others. Two patients had died from somatic diseases. Forty-two patients were interviewed, of whom 17 (40%) had reattempted during the follow-up period, most of them within 3 years. Predictors for reattempt were young age, personality disorder, parents having received treatment for psychiatric disorder, and a poor social network. At the index attempt, none of the reattempters had diagnoses of adjustment disorders or anxiety disorders. At follow-up, reattempters had more psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), and their overall functioning (GAF) was poor compared to those who did not reattempt. All of the reattempters had long-lasting treatment ( > 3 years) as compared to 56% of the others. It is of great clinical importance to focus on treatment strategies for the vulnerable subgroup of self-destructive reattempters.
PubMed ID
8739657 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide attempters: what predicts future suicidal acts?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79019
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2006 Dec;36(6):638-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Groholt Berit
Ekeberg Øivind
Haldorsen Tor
Author Affiliation
Sogn Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Oslo, Norway. berit.groholt@medisin.uio.no
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2006 Dec;36(6):638-50
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Father-Child Relations
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Norway
Recurrence - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Statistics
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Predictors for repetition of suicide attempts were evaluated among 92 adolescent suicide attempters 9 years after an index suicide attempt (90% females). Five were dead, two by suicide. Thirty-one (42%) of 73 had repeated a suicide attempt. In multiple Cox regression analysis, four factors had an independent predictive effect: comorbid disorders, hopelessness, having ever received treatment for mental or behavior problems, and having a father exerting control without affection. Prediction on an individual level was difficult. Since almost half repeated a suicidal act, the best strategy is to evaluate all adolescent suicide attempters thoroughly and provide treatment as needed.
PubMed ID
17250468 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):195-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
T J Taiminen
S. Saarijärvi
H. Helenius
A. Keskinen
T. Korpilahti
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):195-8
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Aged
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Personality Assessment
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Alexithymia seems to share some common features with psychological constriction, a phenomenon described in suicidal individuals. Fifty suicide attempters were interviewed within 24 h after arrival at a hospital, and measures of lethality of the attempt, suicidal intent, depression and alexithymia were carried out with structured instruments. Almost all the attempters were depressive, and about half of them were also alexithymic. However, alexithymia was not more prevalent in this population than in non-suicidal depressive patients. Depression and alexithymia correlated significantly with each other, but there was no correlation between alexithymia and lethality of the suicide attempt or suicidal intent. The authors conclude that alexithymia in suicide attempters seems to be associated with depression, but not with suicidality per se. Therefore, measurement of alexithymia may not yield extra information in suicide risk assessment.
PubMed ID
8739666 View in PubMed
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Anorexia Nervosa, Major Depression, and Suicide Attempts: Shared Genetic Factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286785
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2016 Oct;46(5):525-534
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Laura M Thornton
Elisabeth Welch
Melissa A Munn-Chernoff
Paul Lichtenstein
Cynthia M Bulik
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2016 Oct;46(5):525-534
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The extent to which genetic and environmental factors influenced anorexia nervosa (AN), major depressive disorder (MDD), and suicide attempts (SA) were evaluated. Participants were 6,899 women from the Swedish Twin Study of Adults: Genes and Environment. A Cholesky decomposition assessed independent and overlapping genetic and environmental contributions to AN, MDD, and SA. Genetic factors accounted for a substantial amount of liability to all three traits; unique environmental factors accounted for most of the remaining liability. Shared genetic factors may underlie the coexpression of these traits. Results underscore the importance of assessing for signs of suicide among individuals with AN.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26916469 View in PubMed
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Antisocial behaviour in adolescent suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218671
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1994 Mar;89(3):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
M J Marttunen
H M Aro
M M Henriksson
J K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1994 Mar;89(3):167-73
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antisocial Personality Disorder - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Personality Assessment
Personality Development
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Social Adjustment
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Violence
Abstract
Antisocial behaviour among adolescent suicide victims (44 males, 9 females) was investigated in a nationwide psychological autopsy study of suicides in Finland. The data were collected through interviews of the victims' relatives and attending health care personnel, and from official records. Antisocial behaviour was reported among 43% of the victims. Separation from parents, parental alcohol abuse and parental violence were common among male victims with antisocial behaviour. Their psychosocial adjustment was poor, and they had experienced severe stressors. Depressive disorders were common among all suicides, but male victims with antisocial behaviour had more often alcohol abuse and comorbid mental disorders compared with victims without antisocial behaviour. The results indicate a strong relatedness between adolescent suicide and antisocial behaviour. Recognition and treatment of manifest mental symptoms and evaluation of suicide risk among adolescents with antisocial behaviour and substance abuse is emphasized. Antisocial symptoms with relatively short duration and not severe enough to meet the criteria for actual antisocial disorders also need to be taken into account.
PubMed ID
8178674 View in PubMed
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The association between homelessness and suicidal ideation and behaviors: results of a cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187229
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2002;32(4):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Rahel Eynan
John Langley
George Tolomiczenko
Anne E Rhodes
Paul Links
Donald Wasylenki
Paula Goering
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. eynanr@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2002;32(4):418-27
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Homeless Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk
Sex Factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study was carried out with three goals: (1) to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among the homeless; (2) to determine what aspects of homelessness predict suicidality, and (3) to determine which aspects remain predictive after controlling for key covariates, such as mental illness. A sample of 330 homeless adults were interviewed. Sixty-one percent of the study sample reported suicidal ideation and 34% had attempted suicide. Fifty-six percent of the men and 78% of the women reported prior suicidal ideation, while 28 percent of the men and 57% of the women had attempted suicide. Childhood homelessness of at least 1 week without family members and periods of homelessness longer than 6 months were found to be associated with suicidal ideation. Psychiatric diagnoses were also associated with suicidality in this sample.
PubMed ID
12501966 View in PubMed
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The association between relationship markers of sexual orientation and suicide: Denmark, 1990-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146506
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Feb;46(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Robin M Mathy
Susan D Cochran
Jorn Olsen
Vickie M Mays
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences and Kellogg College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Feb;46(2):111-7
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Bisexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Homosexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality, Female - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality, Male - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Minority sexual orientation has been repeatedly linked to elevated rates of suicide attempts. Whether this translates into greater risk for suicide mortality is unclear. We investigated sexual orientation-related differences in suicide mortality in Denmark during the initial 12-year period following legalization of same-sex registered domestic partnerships (RDPs).
Using data from death certificates issued between 1990 and 2001 and population estimates from the Danish census, we estimated suicide mortality risk among individuals classified into one of three marital/cohabitation statuses: current/formerly in same-sex RDPs; current/formerly heterosexually married; or never married/registered.
Risk for suicide mortality was associated with this proxy indicator of sexual orientation, but only significantly among men. The estimated age-adjusted suicide mortality risk for RDP men was nearly eight times greater than for men with positive histories of heterosexual marriage and nearly twice as high for men who had never married.
Suicide risk appears greatly elevated for men in same-sex partnerships in Denmark. To what extent this is true for similar gay and bisexual men who are not in such relationships is unknown, but these findings call for targeted suicide prevention programs aimed at reducing suicide risk among gay and bisexual men.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20033129 View in PubMed
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[Attempted suicide among children and adolescents--therapeutic possibilities within the health care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37750
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Mar 19;152(12):832-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-1990

Attempted suicide among Inuit youth: psychosocial correlates and implications for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3655
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Oct;43(8):816-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
L J Kirmayer
L J Boothroyd
S. Hodgins
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sir Mortimer B Davis-Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec. cylk@musica.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Oct;43(8):816-22
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Culture
Female
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify potential risk and protective factors associated with attempted suicide among Inuit youth, a population known to have a high rate of both attempted and completed suicide in recent years. METHOD: A secondary analysis of data on 203 Inuit youth (aged 15 to 24 years) from a random community survey conducted by Santé Québec in 1992. Factors previously identified in the literature and in clinical consultation and ethnographic research were tested with bivariate statistics and logistic regression models for each gender. RESULTS: At the bivariate level, positive correlates included substance use (solvents, cannabis, cocaine), recent alcohol abuse, evidence of a psychiatric problem, and a greater number of life events in the last year. Regular church attendance was negatively associated with attempted suicide. Multivariate analysis indicated that a psychiatric problem, recent alcohol abuse, and cocaine or crack use were the strongest correlates of attempted suicide for females, while solvent use and number of recent life events were the strongest correlates for males. CONCLUSIONS: Suicide prevention programs can be targeted at youth who are using substances, particularly solvents, cocaine, and alcohol, have psychiatric illness, and have experienced recent negative life events. Involvement in church or other community activities may reduce the risk for suicide. Consideration of gender differences may allow more precise identification of those at risk for attempted suicide.
PubMed ID
9806088 View in PubMed
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Attempted suicide among young people: risk factors in a prospective register based study of Danish children born in 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9617
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003 Nov;108(5):350-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
M N Christoffersen
H D Poulsen
A. Nielsen
Author Affiliation
The Danish National Institute of Social Research, Copenhagen K, Denmark. mc@sfi.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003 Nov;108(5):350-8
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Causality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: In order to prevent suicidal behaviour among adolescents and young adults it would be valuable to know if altering the conditions of their upbringing could reduce their suicidal behaviour. The study surveys possible risk factors. METHOD: Population-based registers covering children born in Denmark in 1966 at the age span of 14-27 years and their parents for: health, education, family dissolution, suicidal behaviour, substance abuse, criminality and unemployment. A discrete-time proportional hazard modelling was used to analyse the longitudinal observations. RESULTS: First-time suicide attempts were associated with parental psychiatric disorder, suicidal behaviour, violence, child abuse and neglect. Increased risks were also found among adolescents and young adults who suffered from psychiatric disorder or physical handicap, had been legally imprisoned, were addicted to drugs, or without graduation, vocational training or employment. CONCLUSION: Stigmatization, social exclusion, and mental disorders in the adolescents or young adults and parents increased risks for attempted suicide.
PubMed ID
14531755 View in PubMed
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