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5-HT2C receptor and MAO-A interaction analysis: no association with suicidal behaviour in bipolar patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157011
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Vincenzo De Luca
Subi Tharmaligam
John Strauss
James L Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250 College Street, R-30, Toronto (ON), Canada M5T 1R8. vincenzo_deluca@camh.net
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - genetics - psychology
Canada
Family Health
Female
Gene Frequency
Genes, X-Linked
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monoamine Oxidase - genetics
Nuclear Family
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2C - genetics
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The serotonin 2C (HTR2C) receptor has been implicated in suicide-related behaviours, however there are not many studies to date about HTR2C and suicidality. We studied HTR2C haplotypes in suicide attempters, where our sample composed of 306 families with at least one member affected by bipolar disorder. HTR2C (Cys23Ser and a common STR in the promoter) variants were analyzed with respect to attempter status and the severity of suicidal behaviour. The X-linked haplotype analysis in relation to suicide attempt did not reveal any significant association. Furthermore, we performed a particular gene-gene interaction for the X-linked serotonergic genes (HTR2C and MAOA), and found no association among this intergenic haplotype combination and suicidal behaviour in bipolar disorder.
PubMed ID
18504633 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of suicide attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46467
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E. Johnsson Fridell
A. Ojehagen
L. Träskman-Bendz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Cause of Death
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - mortality - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seventy-five patients were admitted to the ward of the Lund Suicide Research Center following a suicide attempt. After 5 years, the patients were followed up by a personal semistructured interview covering sociodemographic, psychosocial and psychiatric areas. Ten patients (13%) had committed suicide during the follow-up period, the majority within 2 years. They tended to be older at the index attempt admission, and most of them had a mood disorder in comparison with the others. Two patients had died from somatic diseases. Forty-two patients were interviewed, of whom 17 (40%) had reattempted during the follow-up period, most of them within 3 years. Predictors for reattempt were young age, personality disorder, parents having received treatment for psychiatric disorder, and a poor social network. At the index attempt, none of the reattempters had diagnoses of adjustment disorders or anxiety disorders. At follow-up, reattempters had more psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), and their overall functioning (GAF) was poor compared to those who did not reattempt. All of the reattempters had long-lasting treatment ( > 3 years) as compared to 56% of the others. It is of great clinical importance to focus on treatment strategies for the vulnerable subgroup of self-destructive reattempters.
PubMed ID
8739657 View in PubMed
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A 12-year National Study of Suicide by Jumping From Bridges in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293093
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Aleksandra Sæheim
Ingebjørg Hestetun
Erlend Mork
Latha Nrugham
Lars Mehlum
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies from several countries suggest that erecting fences on bridges more commonly used for suicide by jumping may be an effective way of reducing the risk of suicide by jumping from these bridges. Distribution of suicides by jumping off bridges has not yet been studied on a national level in any country. This study included all suicides by jumping from high places registered in the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry (COD) in the period 1999-2010 (n = 319). Combining data from the COD registry and information from police records, 71 cases of suicide by jumping off a bridge were identified involving 36 bridges. This form of suicide constituted approximately 1% of all suicides in Norway in the period 1999-2010. Almost half of these suicides were registered at only 6 bridges. Three Norwegian bridges were secured during the observation period of this study. Two bridges had barriers installed on the full length of the bridge with 11 suicides registered before barriers were installed, and none after. On the 1 bridge that was only partially secured, no change in numbers of suicides was observed after barriers were installed. One-third of jumps from bridges occurred over land. We found that although suicide by jumping off bridges was a relatively rare event, there is a potential for saving lives by installing physical barriers on bridges that are more commonly used for suicide by jumping.
PubMed ID
27309998 View in PubMed
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A 20-year prospective study of mortality and causes of death among hospitalized opioid addicts in Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87156
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bjornaas Mari A
Bekken Anette S
Ojlert Aasa
Haldorsen Tor
Jacobsen Dag
Rostrup Morten
Ekeberg Oivind
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, N-0407 Oslo, Norway. mabjornaas@gmail.com
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Male
Mathematical Computing
Narcotics - poisoning
Neoplasms - mortality
Opioid-Related Disorders - mortality - rehabilitation
Overdose - mortality - prevention & control
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Street Drugs - poisoning
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To study mortality rate and causes of death among all hospitalized opioid addicts treated for self-poisoning or admitted for voluntary detoxification in Oslo between 1980 and 1981, and to compare their mortality to that of the general population. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted on 185 opioid addicts from all medical departments in Oslo who were treated for either self-poisoning (n = 93, 1980), voluntary detoxification (n = 75, 1980/1981) or both (n = 17). Their median age was 24 years; with a range from 16 to 41, and 53% were males. All deaths that had occurred by the end of 2000 were identified from the Central Population Register. Causes of death were obtained from Statistics Norway. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for mortality, in general, and in particular, for different causes of death. RESULTS: During a period of 20 years, 70 opioid addicts died (37.8%), with a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) equal to 23.6 (95% CI, 18.7-29.9). The SMR remained high during the whole period, ranging from 32.4 in the first five-year period, to 13.4 in the last five-year period. There were no significant differences in SMR between self-poisonings and those admitted for voluntarily detoxification. The registered causes of death were accidents (11.4%), suicide (7.1%), cancer (4.3%), cardiovascular disease (2.9%), other violent deaths (2.9%), other diseases (71.4%). Among the 50 deaths classified as other diseases, the category "drug dependence" was listed in the vast majority of cases (37 deaths, 52.9% of the total). SMRs increased significantly for all causes of death, with the other diseases group having the highest SMR; 65.8 (95% CI, 49.9-86.9). The SMR was 5.4 (95% CI, 1.3-21.5) for cardiovascular diseases, and 4.3 (95% CI, 1.4-13.5) for cancer. The SMR was 13.2 (95% CI, 6.6-26.4) for accidents, 10.7 (95% CI, 4.5-25.8) for suicides, and 28.6 (95% CI, 7.1-114.4) for other violent deaths. CONCLUSION: The risk of death among opioid addicts was significantly higher for all causes of death compared with the general population, implying a poor prognosis over a 20-year period for this young patient group.
PubMed ID
18271956 View in PubMed
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A 20-year study of an adolescent psychiatric clientele, with special reference to the age of onset.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31748
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Pedersen
T. Aarkrog
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Centralsygehuset i Holbaek, Gl. Ringstedvej 1, DK-4300 Holbaek, Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):5-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia, Childhood - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
During a period of 20 years (1968-1988) all inpatients admitted for the first time to the adolescent psychiatric unit in Copenhagen (n = 841) were classified in accordance with social and psychiatric variables, to describe the clientele as a group and, furthermore, to investigate changes occurring during that period. The total clientele had a broad age range (12-21 years), with as many as 36% less than 15 years old. Eleven percent of the patients had attempted suicide before admission. Fifty-six percent of the total group were diagnosed as psychotic or as borderline cases. The patients came predominantly from lower social levels, and almost half the group had a child debut defined as symptoms that had resulted in referral for further investigation during childhood. Moreover, among the schizophrenic patients 35% had an early onset. The age of onset may have some clinical significance, as this item was related to several sociodemographic variables. Finally, an increase in the rate of psychoses and lower social class was recorded during the period.
PubMed ID
11827600 View in PubMed
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A 22- to 25-year follow-up study of former child psychiatric patients: a register-based investigation of the course of psychiatric disorder and mortality in 546 Danish child psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34537
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Dec;94(6):397-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
P H Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Research Center, Psychiatric Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Dec;94(6):397-403
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - mortality - therapy
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality - therapy
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Abstract
A total of 546 children and adolescents, aged 5 to 15 years, who were admitted as in-patients to psychiatric hospitals throughout Denmark between 1970 and 1973, were followed up with regard to later readmissions and mortality. Approximately one-third of the sample had at least one readmission after the age of 18 years; there was no significant difference between male and female subjects. Probands with three selected diagnoses, namely childhood neurosis, conduct disorder and maladjustment reactions, did have a significantly greater general risk of readmission to psychiatric hospital in adulthood than the background population. In total, 24 probands (22 male, and 2 female subjects) died during the study period. Eight subjects had committed suicide. The standard mortality rate was significantly increased.
PubMed ID
9020989 View in PubMed
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The 2009 Nobel conference on the role of genetics in promoting suicide prevention and the mental health of the population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98540
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2010 Jan;15(1):12-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
D. Wasserman
L. Terenius
J. Wasserman
M. Sokolowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, The National Prevention of Suicide and Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute (KI), Stockholm, Sweden. Danuta.Wasserman@ki.se
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2010 Jan;15(1):12-7
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses as topic
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Mental health
Nobel Prize
Population Groups
Suicide - prevention & control
Abstract
A 3-day Nobel Conference entitled 'The role of genetics in promoting suicide prevention and the mental health of the population' was held at the Nobel Forum, Karolinska Institute (KI) in Stockholm, Sweden, during 8-10 June 2009. The conference was sponsored by the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine and organized by the National Prevention for Suicide and Mental Ill-Health and the Center for Molecular Medicine at KI. The program consisted of 19 invited presentations, covering the genetic basis of mood/psychotic disorders and substance abuse in relation to suicide, with topics ranging from cellular-molecular mechanisms to (endo)phenotypes of mental disorders at the level of the individual and populations. Here, we provide an overview based on the highlights of what was presented.
PubMed ID
20029410 View in PubMed
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The 2015 National Canadian Homeless Youth Survey: Mental Health and Addiction Findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291013
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Sean A Kidd
Stephen Gaetz
Bill O'Grady
Author Affiliation
1 Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Homeless Youth - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sexual and Gender Minorities - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study was designed to provide a representative description of the mental health of youth accessing homelessness services in Canada. It is the most extensive survey in this area to date and is intended to inform the development of mental health and addiction service and policy for this marginalized population.
This study reports mental health-related data from the 2015 "Leaving Home" national youth homelessness survey, which was administered through 57 agencies serving homeless youth in 42 communities across the country. This self-reported, point-in-time survey assessed a broad range of demographic information, pre-homelessness and homelessness variables, and mental health indicators.
Survey data were obtained from 1103 youth accessing Canadian homelessness services in the Nunavut territory and all Canadian provinces except for Prince Edward Island. Forty-two per cent of participants reported 1 or more suicide attempts, 85.4% fell in a high range of psychological distress, and key indicators of risk included an earlier age of the first episode of homelessness, female gender, and identifying as a sexual and/or gender minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and 2 spirit [LGBTQ2S]).
This study provides clear and compelling evidence of a need for mental health support for these youth, particularly LGBTQ2S youth and female youth. The mental health concerns observed here, however, must be considered in the light of the tremendous adversity in all social determinants faced by these youth, with population-level interventions best leveraged in prevention and rapid response.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28372467 View in PubMed
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[A 15-year follow-up study after deliberate self-poisoning]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68428
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3065-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1997
Author
T. Rygnestad
Author Affiliation
Anestesiavdelingen Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3065-9
Date
Sep-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Prognosis
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The 15-year follow-up of mortality and the factors associated with death from various causes were studied in an unselected group of patients surviving deliberate self-poisoning in 1978. The cohort included 152 females and 101 males. By the end of 1993 a total of 37 (24%) of the females and 33 (33%) of the males admitted in 1978 had died. The total follow-up mortality was 4.5 times greater than expected for the female group (95% confidence interval: 3.1-6.1) and 3.6 times greater than expected (2.5-5.1) for the male group. It was highest in the first 5-year period. With regard to specific causes the mortality ratio was highest for deaths from suicide. For females it was 61.1 (30.5-109.4) and for males: 38.8 (20.4-65.4) times the expected ratio. It was also significantly raised for deaths from cardiovascular diseases in females: SMR = 3.7 (2.0-6.4) and from respiratory diseases in males: SMR = 3.3 (1.2-7.1). Significant predictors for death from all causes were age > or = 30 years: RR = 4.4 (2.3-8.5) and male sex: RR = 2.1 (1.2-3.5). Imprisonment was found to be a protective factor: RR = 0.2 (0.1-0.5). Predictors for death from suicide were age > or = 30: RR = 3.1 (1.2-8.1), male sex: RR = 3.3 (1.4-7.9) and a serious suicidal attempt, as evaluated by a psychiatrist: RR = 3.4 (1.4-7.9). It is concluded that patients who survive parasuicide by deliberate self-poisoning are at increased risk of death. The predictors for death are not very specific and are difficult to apply in clinical work with these patients.
PubMed ID
9381437 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1996
Author
H L MacMillan
A B MacMillan
D R Offord
J L Dingle
Author Affiliation
Center for Studies of Children at Risk.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-78
Date
Dec-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Morbidity
Mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To inform health care workers about the health status of Canada's native people. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search for articles published from Jan. 1, 1989, to Nov. 31, 1995, with the use of subject headings "Eskimos" and "Indians, North American," excluding specific subject headings related to genetics and history. Case reports were excluded. Material was also identified from a review of standard references and bibliographies and from consultation with experts. STUDY SELECTION: Review and research articles containing original data concerning epidemiologic aspects of native health. Studies of Canadian populations were preferred, but population-based studies of US native peoples were included if limited Canadian information was available. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about target population, methods and conclusions was extracted from each study. RESULTS: Mortality and morbidity rates are higher in the native population than in the general Canadian population. The infant mortality rates averaged for the years 1986 to 1990 were 13.8 per 1000 live births among Indian infants, 16.3 per 1000 among Inuit infants, and only 7.3 per 1000 among all Canadian infants. Age-standardized all-cause mortality rates among residents of reserves averaged for the years 1979 to 1983 were 561.0 per 100,000 population among men and 334.6 per 100,000 among women, compared with 340.2 per 100,000 among all Canadian men and 173.4 per 100,000 among all Canadian women. Compared with the general Canadian population, specific native populations have an increased risk of death from alcoholism, homicide, suicide and pneumonia. Of the aboriginal population of Canada 15 years of age and older, 31% have been informed that they have a chronic health problem. Diabetes mellitus affects 6% of aboriginal adults, compared with 2% of all Canadian adults. Social problems identified by aboriginal people as a concern in their community include substance abuse, suicide, unemployment and family violence. Subgroups of aboriginal people are at a greater-than-normal risk of infectious diseases, injuries, respiratory diseases, nutritional problems (including obesity) and substance abuse. Initial data suggest that, compared with the general population, some subgroups of the native population have a lower incidence of heart disease and certain types of cancer. However, knowledge about contributing factors to the health status of aboriginal people is limited, since the literature generally does not assess confounding factors such as poverty. CONCLUSIONS: Canadian aboriginal people die earlier than their fellow Canadians, on average, and sustain a disproportionate share of the burden of physical disease and mental illness. However, few studies have assessed poverty as a confounding factor. Future research priorities in native health are best determined by native people themselves.
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1581-38956835
PubMed ID
8956834 View in PubMed
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3405 records – page 1 of 341.