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Are breastfeeding problems related to incorrect breastfeeding technique and the use of pacifiers and bottles?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58992
Source
Birth. 1998 Mar;25(1):40-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
L. Righard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Lund, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Birth. 1998 Mar;25(1):40-4
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bottle Feeding
Breast Feeding - adverse effects
Chi-Square Distribution
Child Health Services
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Neonatal Nursing
Parity
Pregnancy
Sucking Behavior
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In Western countries during the 1960s and 1970s, sore nipples and insufficient milk were common problems that made it hard for mothers to maintain breastfeeding for long. This study investigated the relationship of breastfeeding problems to nursing behavior and pacifier use. METHODS: Fifty-two healthy mother-infant pairs with breastfeeding problems were referred for observation of nursing behavior to a breastfeeding clinic at the Department of Pediatrics of Malmö General Hospital, Malmö, Sweden, from August 1987 to July 1989. The infants ranged in age from 1 to 17 weeks. A faulty nursing pattern was corrected as necessary. Forty mother-infant pairs with no breastfeeding problems provided a control group. RESULTS: In most cases the nursing problems were related to incorrect sucking technique. The difference in technique of the study group compared with the control group was significant (p = 0.0001). The continuation of breastfeeding was poorer if the infant already had become used to bottle-feeding. Pacifier use was more common in conjunction with breastfeeding problems and in cases with a faulty superficial nipple-sucking technique. CONCLUSION: Breastfeeding problems may be prevented by the adoption of hospital routines that do not interfere with the start of breastfeeding and by the avoidance of extensive use of pacifiers.
PubMed ID
9534504 View in PubMed
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Artificial sucking habits: etiology, prevalence and effect on occlusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35603
Source
Int J Orofacial Myology. 1994 Nov;20:10-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
E. Larsson
Author Affiliation
University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Int J Orofacial Myology. 1994 Nov;20:10-21
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fingersucking - adverse effects
Habits
Humans
Infant
Infant Care - instrumentation
Male
Malocclusion - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Sucking Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tooth Migration - complications
Abstract
Active digit-sucking results in 1) reduced vertical growth of the frontal parts of alveolar process which creates an anterior open bite; 2) proclination of the upper incisors as a result of the horizontal force created by the digit; 3) anterior displacement of the maxilla for the same reason; 4) anterior rotation of the maxilla, resulting in an increased prevalence of posterior crossbite in the deciduous dentition; and 6) proclination or retroclination of the lower incisors which seems to be due to the strength of the tightness of the lower lip and tongue activity during sucking. When the sucking habit stops, the anterior open bite will correct itself spontaneously, due to increased growth of the alveolar processes, provided that the patient is still growing. If the lip activity and the lip/teeth relationship is normal, the upper incisors will upright themselves, and sometimes, due to the anterior displacement of maxilla, become somewhat retroclined. The skeletal effect of the sucking habit will remain. Improper use of a pacifier can create quite disastrous effects on the occlusion, if, for instance, the child has the shield. Otherwise, the effect of the pacifier is limited to the vertical and the transversal plane. The anterior open bite is normally more obvious and visible earlier in pacifier-suckers than in digit-suckers. As in digit-suckers, the open bite is associated with tongue-thrust during swallowing. Also in pacifier-suckers, the open bite will correct itself spontaneously when the habit stops despite the tongue-thrust. Sucking a pacifier is more clearly related to a posterior crossbite in the deciduous dentition than is digit-sucking. When the pacifier is in the child's mouth, the teat occupies the upper part of the anterior and middle part of the mouth thus forcing the tongue to a lower position. In the upper jaw, the teeth in the canine area lack palatal support from the tongue during the sucking activity of the cheeks. This reduces the arch width and increases the risk of a transversal malrelation between the upper and lower arches. The low tongue position widens the lower jaw in the same area thus enhancing the probability of the development of a posterior cross-bite.
PubMed ID
9055659 View in PubMed
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Association between early weaning, non-nutritive sucking habits and occlusal anomalies in 3-year-old Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198563
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1999 Sep;9(3):169-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
S. Karjalainen
O. Rönning
H. Lapinleimu
O. Simell
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Dentistry, University of Turku, Finland. sarakar@utu.fi
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1999 Sep;9(3):169-73
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Bottle Feeding - adverse effects
Breast Feeding
Chi-Square Distribution
Child, Preschool
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Malocclusion - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Sampling Studies
Sucking Behavior
Time Factors
Weaning
Abstract
OBJECTIVES, DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: Earlier results on the effect of breastfeeding on the one hand, and non-nutritive sucking habits (pacifier and/or digit sucking) on the other, on the orofacial development of infants are inconclusive. Thus we studied the prevalence of malocclusions and their relationship to the duration of breastfeeding and to non-nutritive sucking habits in a group of randomly selected 3-year-old children (n = 148).
Posterior crossbite was detected in 13%, anterior open bite in 18% and large overjet (> 3 mm) in 26% of the children. The proportion of children with anterior vertical open bite was significantly larger among children with non-nutritive sucking habits than among the other children (P
PubMed ID
10815573 View in PubMed
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Birth to breast--a feeding care map for the NICU: helping the extremely low birth weight infant navigate the course.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153822
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2008 Nov-Dec;27(6):371-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dorothy Dougherty
Maureen Luther
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. dorothy.dougherty@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2008 Nov-Dec;27(6):371-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Breast Feeding - psychology
Colostrum
Critical Pathways - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Nursing
Humans
Infant care
Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight - physiology - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - organization & administration
Mothers - education - psychology
Neonatal Nursing - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Ontario
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic
Posture
Rooming-in Care
Social Support
Sucking Behavior
Suction - education - psychology
Abstract
Breast milk has been shown to contribute significantly to positive neurodevelopmental and medical outcomes in the extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infant population. It is crucial that ELBW infants receive their mother's colostrum as a first feeding, followed by expressed breast milk for as long as possible. Evidence-based literature supports the difficult challenges both mothers and ELBW infants face if they are to succeed at breast pumping and breastfeeding. Influencing factors include the medical fragility of the infant, limited frequency and duration of kangaroo care between mother and infant, lack of an adequate volume of breast milk, as well as inconsistent or incorrect information surrounding the use of breast milk and breastfeeding. A feeding care map as described in this article can help the bedside nurse assist the mother-ELBW infant dyad in optimizing breast milk volumes, laying the groundwork for breastfeeding. Displaying supportive practices and preterm infant developmental milestones, the map categorizes infant, maternal, and dyad feeding issues along a progressive time line from admission to discharge.
Notes
Comment In: Neonatal Netw. 2009 Jul-Aug;28(4):267-8; author reply 26819592371
PubMed ID
19065966 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding and the use of pacifiers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59070
Source
Birth. 1997 Jun;24(2):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
L. Righard
M O Alade
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Lund, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Birth. 1997 Jun;24(2):116-20
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior
Nursing Assessment
Sucking Behavior
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study was designed to test the hypothesis that incorrect sucking technique and pacifier use are factors contributing to breastfeeding failure. METHOD: The nursing patterns of 82 exclusively breastfeeding mother-infant pairs were observed 4 to 5 days postpartum on the maternity ward at University Hospital in Malmö, Sweden. The breastfeeding outcome and pacifier use was assessed by regular telephone contacts during a 4-month follow-up. RESULTS: The breastfeeding rate at 4 months was 91 percent in the nonpacifier group and 44 percent in the pacifier group (p = 0.03). An incorrect superficial nipple-sucking technique at the breast from the start combined with pacifier use resulted in early weaning in most cases. CONCLUSION: To promote successful breastfeeding and to reduce nursing problems, an incorrect sucking technique should be prevented or corrected, and the use of pacifiers should be avoided or restricted.
PubMed ID
9271978 View in PubMed
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Breast-feeding in preterm twins: Development of feeding behavior and milk intake during hospital stay and related caregiving practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58479
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2002 Aug;17(4):246-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Kerstin Hedberg Nyqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden. Kerstin.Hedberg_Nyqvist@kbh.uu.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2002 Aug;17(4):246-56
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health Facility Environment
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Posture
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sucking Behavior
Sweden
Twins
Abstract
In a prospective study of 13 preterm twins still in the hospital, 85% were breast-fed, of which 46% were breast-fed exclusively. Most mothers preferred simultaneous breast-feeding, using the football hold. Observations and maternal descriptions showed differences between the twins in their development of breast-feeding behavior, especially in sucking. The mothers' suggestions regarding special support for the breast-feeding mothers of preterm twins involved synchronizing feeding with the twins' behavioral states; twin cobedding; appropriate armchairs and breast-feeding pillows; experimenting with breast-feeding positions; information about breast milk production; nurses' spontaneous practical assistance, encouragement, and emotional support; the provision of privacy; the availability of parent rooms; and opportunities for fathers' presence in the hospital.
PubMed ID
12219324 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding patterns in exclusively breastfed infants: a longitudinal prospective study in Uppsala, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52592
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Feb;88(2):203-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
A. Hörnell
C. Aarts
E. Kylberg
Y. Hofvander
M. Gebre-Medhin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden. ICH.sekretariat@ich.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Feb;88(2):203-11
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Catchment Area (Health)
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Age
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sucking Behavior - physiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Exclusive breastfeeding was studied among 506 infants in Uppsala, Sweden, based on daily recordings during the first 6 mo. The mothers had previously breastfed at least one infant for at least 4 mo. Most of the mothers considered that they breastfed on demand. Wide variations in breastfeeding frequency and suckling duration were found both between different infants and in the individual infant over time. At 2 wk, the mean frequency of daytime feeds (based on one 13-d record) between different infants ranged from 2.9 to 10.8 and night-time feeds from 1.0 to 5.1. The daytime suckling duration (based on one 24-h record) ranged from 20 min to 4h 35 min and night-time duration from 0 to 2h 8 min. At any given age, a maximum of only 2% of the infants were not breastfed during the night. At 4 mo, 95% of the infants were breastfeeding and 40% were exclusively breastfed at this age. Longer breastfeeding duration and longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding were both associated with higher frequency of breastfeeds, longer breastfeeding of the previous child and higher education. No gender differences were found. Maternal smoking was associated with shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and pacifier use was associated with shorter duration of both exclusive breastfeeding and total breastfeeding. This study confirms that every mother-infant pair needs to be understood as a unique dyad throughout lactation. These data demonstrate a wide range of patterns among women who are exclusively breastfeeding and indicate that it would be inappropriate to put pressure on individual families to adopt preconceived patterns of infant feeding.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 1999 Dec;88(12):1412-310626534
PubMed ID
10102156 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding patterns in relation to thumb sucking and pacifier use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58836
Source
Pediatrics. 1999 Oct;104(4):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
C. Aarts
A. Hörnell
E. Kylberg
Y. Hofvander
M. Gebre-Medhin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Section for International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. clara.aarts@ich.uu.se
Source
Pediatrics. 1999 Oct;104(4):e50
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fingersucking
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Life tables
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sucking Behavior
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To analyze the influence of thumb sucking and pacifier use on breastfeeding patterns in exclusively breastfed infants, on the duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and on the total breastfeeding duration. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, longitudinal, prospective study. SETTING: The subjects were recruited from a population of 15 189 infants born in the maternity ward at the University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden between May 1989 and December 1992. STUDY POPULATION: 506 mother-infant pairs. METHODS: Daily recordings by the mothers on infant feeding from the first week after delivery through the duration of the study. Fortnightly home visits with structured interviews by a research assistant. RESULTS: Pacifier use was associated with fewer feeds and shorter suckling duration per 24 hours, shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and shorter total breastfeeding duration compared with no pacifier use. These associations were not found for thumb sucking. The possible negative effects of pacifiers on breastfeeding seemed to be related to the frequency of their use. Maternal age and education only slightly modified the association between pacifier use and breastfeeding duration. CONCLUSIONS: More frequent use of a pacifier was associated with shorter breastfeeding duration, even among a group of mothers who were highly motivated to breastfeed. breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding pattern, exclusive breastfeeding, pacifier use, thumb sucking.
PubMed ID
10506275 View in PubMed
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Children with Down Syndrome: oral development and morphology after use of palatal plates between 6 and 18 months of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30789
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2003 Sep;13(5):327-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
B. Bäckman
A-C Grevér-Sjölander
A-K Holm
I. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology/Paediatric Dentistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. birgitta.backman@odont.umu.se
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2003 Sep;13(5):327-35
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child Language
Comparative Study
Dental Occlusion
Down Syndrome - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mouth - growth & development - pathology - physiopathology
Myofunctional Therapy - instrumentation
Orthodontic Appliance Design
Orthodontic Appliances, Functional
Patient compliance
Proprioception - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensation - physiology
Speech - physiology
Speech Therapy
Sucking Behavior - physiology
Tongue - abnormalities - physiopathology
Tooth Eruption - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe oral development and morphology in 18-month-old children with Down syndrome (DS) treated with palatal plates in combination with structured communication and speech training. The aim is further to describe the design of the palatal plates, compliance in their use and to give a brief report of their effect on oral motor function and speech. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Forty-two children with DS were followed from
PubMed ID
12924988 View in PubMed
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Dietary habits related to caries development and immigrant status in infants and toddlers living in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35071
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Dec;53(6):339-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
L K Wendt
D. Birkhed
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dental Care, County of Jönköping, Norrahammar, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1995 Dec;53(6):339-44
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bottle Feeding
Breast Feeding
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - etiology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Eating
Emigration and Immigration
Food Habits
Humans
Infant
Interviews
Longitudinal Studies
Parents
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sleep
Sucking Behavior
Sucrose - administration & dosage
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the dietary habits of infants and toddlers living in Sweden with special reference to caries prevalence at 2 and 3 years of age and to immigrant status. The study was designed as a prospective, longitudinal study starting with 671 children aged 1 year. At 3 years, all children were invited to a further examination. A total of 298 individuals, randomly selected from the original group, were also examined at 2 years. The accompanying parent was interviewed about the child's dietary habits. Children with caries at 2 and 3 years of age and immigrant children had, when they were 1 year old, consumed caries-risk products and been given nocturnal meals and sweetened liquid in a feeding bottle more often than caries-free 2- and 3-year-olds and non-immigrant children. Although a great variation in dietary habits was found in infants and toddlers, the use of sugar-containing products is widespread in Sweden even in early childhood.
PubMed ID
8849865 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.