Skip header and navigation

Refine By

95 records – page 1 of 10.

Adolescent suicide attempts in Bærum, Norway, 1984-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138824
Source
Crisis. 2010;31(5):255-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Gudrun Dieserud
Ragnhild M Gerhardsen
Hanne Van den Weghe
Karina Corbett
Author Affiliation
Department of Suicide Research and Prevention, Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. gudi@fhi.no
Source
Crisis. 2010;31(5):255-64
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Conflict (Psychology)
Family - psychology
Female
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - trends
Population Surveillance
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Suburban Population - trends
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - trends
Abstract
There are presently few international studies that examine adolescents' own experience of both triggering and the underlying reasons behind their suicide attempts.
To present the rates, triggering factors, and underlying reasons for such behavior.
The 23-year (1984-2006) surveillance study reported includes all general hospital-treated suicide attempters aged between 13 and 19 years (n = 254) living in the municipality of Bærum, a suburb on the outskirts of Oslo, Norway.
Suicide attempt rates for both sexes decreased during the period of study. The female suicide attempt rate was on average 3.5 times higher than the male rate. An average of 8.2% of the suicide attempters made a repeat attempt within the following year. Overall, the most commonly reported trigger was a relational conflict (50.2%), and the most commonly reported underlying reason was a dysfunctional family situation (43.6%), followed by mental health problems (22.8%). The main gender difference for both triggers and underlying reasons was that relational conflicts were reported significantly more often by girls than by boys as triggers (55.0% versus 32.7%), and dysfunctional family issues were reported significantly more often by girls than by boys (47.1% versus 30.8%) as underlying reasons for the attempt. Mental health problems were reported less frequently as an underlying reason by girls than boys (21.2% versus 28.8%).
A family-oriented intervention embracing the extended family system seems warranted in a majority of the cases in our study.
PubMed ID
21134845 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aetiological factors and prevalence of severe mental retardation in children in a Swedish municipality: the possible role of consanguinity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33687
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1998 Sep;40(9):608-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
E. Fernell
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1998 Sep;40(9):608-11
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Consanguinity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Down Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mental Retardation - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Risk factors
Sex ratio
Suburban Population - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of severe mental retardation (SMR) was studied in one of the 24 suburban municipalities in Stockholm. The study area had a high proportion of non-European nationals. The study population comprised 14138 children born between 1979 and 1992 who resided in this municipality on the census day, 31 December 1995. The total prevalence of SMR was 4.5 per 1000, being 3.7 per 1000 and 5.9 per 1000 in the European and in the non-European population, respectively. The majority of cases (66%) had a definite prenatal origin. Down syndrome was the cause in 20%. Six families (10%) had at least two children with SMR. It was concluded that the prevalence was higher than in previous Swedish studies. Many cases were attributed to genetic factors. Consanguineous marriages were assumed to be a factor of importance in the distribution of aetiologies. Demographic differences between areas in Sweden must be considered when planning habilitation services.
PubMed ID
9766738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air pollution and respiratory health among children with asthmatic or cough symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207815
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
K L Timonen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-52
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - diagnosis - etiology
Child
Cough - diagnosis - etiology
Finland
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Seasons
Suburban Population - statistics & numerical data
Temperature
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
During the winter of 1994, the association between daily changes in air pollution and in the respiratory health of children 7 to 12 yr of age were studied in Kuopio, Finland. Seventy-four children with asthmatic symptoms and 95 children with cough only, living either in urban or suburban areas, were followed for 3 mo. During the study period, the mean daily concentration of particulate air pollution (PM10) was 18 micrograms/m3 in the urban area and 13 micrograms/m3 in the suburban area. Lagged concentrations of PM10, black smoke, and NO2 were significantly associated with declines in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) among asthmatic children. The regression coefficient (x10) for a 2-d lag of PM10 was -0.911 (SE, 0.386) in the urban and -1.05 (0.596), in the suburban area. Among children with cough only, PM10, black smoke, and NO2 were not significantly associated with PEF. In the urban area, there was a significant association between SO2 and morning and evening PEF and incidence of upper respiratory symptoms among children who cough only. No other associations between air pollution and evening PEF or respiratory symptoms were observed. This study suggests that particulate air pollution is associated with respiratory health, especially among children with asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
9279238 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol habits in a suburban male cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10278
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2000 Dec;28(4):275-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. Bohman
P. Wennberg
T. Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2000 Dec;28(4):275-82
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Conflict (Psychology)
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interviews
Longitudinal Studies
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Suburban Population
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Using data from a prospective birth-to-maturity project, the study presents normally occurring variations in alcohol involvement of alcohol-related problems among a representative cohort of Swedish males in young middle age, born in a Swedish metropolitan area (n = 106). METHODS: Description and classification were based on an analysis of self-reported information (collected at about 36 years of age) about frequency and quantity of alcohol consumption (four-week timeline), self-reported alcohol-related symptoms, and registry data. RESULTS: According to a broad, operationally defined classification of "harmful drinking" (at least three alcohol-related symptoms, including alcohol-related crimes), 43 subjects (41%) had experienced a substantial drinking problem during their lifetime, to an extent that might warrant labels such as "alcoholism" or "hazardous drinking". About one-third of these misusers were currently using other drugs. Of the 106 subjects, 80 (75%) reported having had at least one alcohol-related symptom or problem at some time during their life. Taking various life events into account, including sociomedical circumstances and heavy consumption at 18 and 25 years, 23 subjects (22%) were classified as having a lifetime prevalence of alcohol abuse/dependence according to DSM-III criteria. CONCLUSION: Problem drinking was largely unknown to the healthcare system and only a few subjects had received treatment. The results are discussed in the light of data from other national and international epidemiological surveys.
PubMed ID
11228115 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outbreak of serogroup B:15:P1.16 meningococcal disease, Frederiksborg County, Denmark, 1987-9.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36826
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1992 Feb;108(1):19-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
S. Samuelsson
P. Ege
L. Berthelsen
I. Lind
Author Affiliation
Neisseria Department, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1992 Feb;108(1):19-30
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Bacteremia - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - isolation & purification
Prevalence
Rifampin - therapeutic use
Seasons
Serotyping
Sex Factors
Suburban Population
Abstract
Epidemiological features of an outbreak of group B:15:P1.16 meningococcal disease (MD) in Frederiksborg county, Denmark, 1987-9, were investigated. The study comprised 149 cases notified during the outbreak and the two preceding years; 115 were confirmed by the isolation of Neisseria meningitidis. In 1989 the incidence had increased to 14.1 per 100,000 population. Among group B strains, B:15:P1.16 accounted for 80% (77/97). The overall mortality rate was 10% (15/149). Regarding cases due to group B:15:P1.16 strains a significant time-space clustering, which exclusively occurred within the 10-19 years age group, was demonstrated. The link between cases within clusters was indirect or unknown, except for ten patients with contact to one particular school. The prophylactic measures used included administration of rifampicin to household contacts. During the outbreak the proportion of secondary cases was high (6-15%). All secondary cases occurred outside the household indicating that the household had been protected.
PubMed ID
1547836 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are environmental influences on physical activity distinct for urban, suburban, and rural schools? A multilevel study among secondary school students in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115355
Source
J Sch Health. 2013 May;83(5):357-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Erin P Hobin
Scott Leatherdale
Steve Manske
Joel A Dubin
Susan Elliott
Paul Veugelers
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ephobin@uwaterloo.ca
Source
J Sch Health. 2013 May;83(5):357-67
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Ontario
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Suburban Population
Urban Population
Abstract
This study examined differences in students' time spent in physical activity (PA) across secondary schools in rural, suburban, and urban environments and identified the environment-level factors associated with these between school differences in students' PA.
Multilevel linear regression analyses were used to examine the environment- and student-level characteristics associated with time spent in PA among grades 9 to 12 students attending 76 secondary schools in Ontario, Canada, as part of the SHAPES-Ontario study. This approach was first conducted with the full data set testing for interactions between environment-level factors and school location. Then, school-location specific regression models were run separately.
Statistically significant between-school variation was identified among students attending urban (s(2) µ0 ?=?8959.63 [372.46]), suburban (s(2) µ0 ?=?8918.75 [186.20]), and rural (s(2) µ0 ?=?9403.17 [203.69]) schools, where school-level differences accounted for 4.0%, 2.0%, and 2.1% of the variability in students' time spent in PA, respectively. Students attending an urban or suburban school that provided another room for PA or was located within close proximity to a shopping mall or fast food outlet spent more time in PA.
Students' time spent in PA varies by school location and some features of the school environment have a different impact on students' time spent in PA by school location. Developing a better understanding of the environment-level characteristics associated with students' time spent in PA by school location may help public health and planning experts to tailor school programs and policies to the needs of students in different locations.
PubMed ID
23517004 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the influence of the built environment on physical activity for utility and recreation in suburban metro Vancouver.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128331
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:959
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lisa Oliver
Nadine Schuurman
Alexander Hall
Michael Hayes
Author Affiliation
Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:959
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Data Collection
Environment Design
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Recreation - physiology
Suburban Population
Abstract
Physical inactivity and associated co-morbidities such as obesity and cardiovascular disease are estimated to have large societal costs. There is increasing interest in examining the role of the built environment in shaping patterns of physical activity. However, few studies have: (1) simultaneously examined physical activity for leisure and utility; (2) selected study areas with a range of built environment characteristics; and (3) assessed the built environment using high-resolution land use data.
Data on individuals used for this study are from a survey of 1602 adults in selected sites across suburban Metro Vancouver. Four types of physical activity were assessed: walking to work/school, walking for errands, walking for leisure and moderate physical activity for exercise. The built environment was assessed by constructing one-kilometre road network buffers around each respondent's postal code. Measures of the built environment include terciles of recreational and park land, residential land, institutional land, commercial land and land use mix.
Logistic regression analyses showed that walking to work/school and moderate physical activity were not associated with any built environment measure. Living in areas with lower land use mix, lower commercial and lower recreational land increased the odds of low levels of walking for errands. Individuals living in the lower third of land use mix and institutional land were more likely to report low levels of walking for leisure.
These results suggest that walking for errands and leisure have a greater association with the built environment than other dimensions of physical activity.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2007 Mar;97(3):486-9217267713
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2010 Jul;39(1):25-3220547277
Cites: Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):588-60216935020
Cites: Health Place. 2007 Sep;13(3):713-2417239654
Cites: Obes Rev. 2007 Jul;8(4):307-2617578381
Cites: Obes Rev. 2007 Sep;8(5):425-4017716300
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Nov;65(9):1898-91417644231
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:4117883870
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2007 Nov;33(5):387-9517950404
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Dec;22(12):1674-8017932724
Cites: Health Place. 2008 Jun;14(2):217-2717662638
Cites: Prev Med. 2008 Jan;46(1):33-4017481721
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Jul;35(1):38-4618541175
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Jul;40(7 Suppl):S550-6618562973
Cites: Prev Med. 2008 Aug;47(2):172-818565576
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2008 Jul-Aug;22(6):433-618677884
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Aug;23(2 Suppl):36-4312133736
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Aug;23(2 Suppl):64-7312133739
Cites: Can J Appl Physiol. 2004 Feb;29(1):90-11515001807
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2004 Aug;27(2):87-9615261894
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Feb;28(2 Suppl 2):117-2515694519
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Feb;28(2):149-5515710269
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Jul;59(7):558-6415965138
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2006 May;16(5):387-9416005246
Cites: Health Place. 2006 Dec;12(4):361-7116814195
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Dec;63(11):2835-4616952415
Cites: J Aging Phys Act. 2006 Jul;14(3):302-1217090807
Cites: Health Place. 2007 Mar;13(1):111-2216387522
Cites: Public Health. 2006 Dec;120(12):1127-3217067646
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Jan;61(1):34-917183012
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Sep;35(3):237-4418692736
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Dec;35(6):547-5319000844
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Feb;36(2):174-8119135908
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Feb;68(3):427-3519036490
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2009 Apr;37(2):228-3819396503
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1130-4119632875
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Nov;69(9):1296-30519733426
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Nov;37(5):397-40419840694
Cites: Sports Med. 2009;39(12):995-100919902982
Cites: Prev Med. 2009 Dec;49(6):500-519857513
Cites: Prev Med. 2010 Jan;50 Suppl 1:S24-919818363
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Jun;70(11):1806-1520299141
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2010 May-Jun;24(5):354-6120465151
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2007 Apr;32(4):298-30417383560
PubMed ID
22208549 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bikeability and methodological issues using the active commuting route environment scale (ACRES) in a metropolitan setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137848
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11(1):6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lina Wahlgren
Peter Schantz
Author Affiliation
The Research Unit for Movement, Health and Environment, The Åstrand Laboratory, GIH - The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11(1):6
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advertising as Topic
Bicycling - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Body mass index
Environment
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Questionnaires
Social Class
Suburban Population
Sweden
Transportation - methods
Urban Population
Abstract
Route environments can positively influence people's active commuting and thereby contribute to public health. The Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES) was developed to study active commuters' perceptions of their route environments. However, bicycle commuters represent a small portion of the population in many cities and thus are difficult to study using population-based material. Therefore, the aim of this study is to expand the state of knowledge concerning the criterion-related validity of the ACRES and the representativity using an advertisement-recruited sample. Furthermore, by comparing commuting route environment profiles of inner urban and suburban areas, we provide a novel basis for understanding the relationship between environment and bikeability.
Bicycle commuters from Greater Stockholm, Sweden, advertisement- (n = 1379) and street-recruited (n = 93), responded to the ACRES. Traffic planning and environmental experts from the Municipality of Stockholm (n = 24) responded to a modified version of the ACRES. The criterion-related validity assessments were based on whether or not differences between the inner urban and the suburban route environments, as indicated by the experts and by four existing objective measurements, were reflected by differences in perceptions of these environments. Comparisons of ratings between advertisement- and street-recruited participants were used for the assessments of representativity. Finally, ratings of inner urban and suburban route environments were used to evaluate commuting route environment profiles.
Differences in ratings of the inner urban and suburban route environments by the advertisement-recruited participants were in accord with the existing objective measurements and corresponded reasonably well with those of the experts. Overall, there was a reasonably good correspondence between the advertisement- and street-recruited participants' ratings. Distinct differences in commuting route environment profiles were noted between the inner urban and suburban areas. Suburban route environments were rated as safer and more stimulating for bicycle-commuting than the inner urban ones. In general, the findings applied to both men and women.
The overall results show: considerable criterion-related validity of the ACRES; ratings of advertisement-recruited participants mirroring those of street-recruited participants; and a higher degree of bikeability in the suburban commuting route environments than in the inner urban ones.
Notes
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2002;80(12):933-812571720
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2010 Sep-Oct;25(1):40-720809831
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 2003 Sep-Oct;18(1):83-9213677966
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Feb;28(2 Suppl 2):105-1615694518
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Feb;28(2 Suppl 2):117-2515694519
Cites: Health Place. 2005 Sep;11(3):227-3615774329
Cites: Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2005 Oct;33(4):175-8116239834
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2006;27:297-32216533119
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Sep;38(9):1682-9116960531
Cites: J Urban Health. 2007 Mar;84(2):162-8417273926
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2007 May;32(5):361-36917478260
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2007 Jan;4(1):66-7917489008
Cites: Sports Med. 2008;38(9):751-818712942
Cites: Prev Med. 2008 Sep;47(3):294-818544463
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Apr;36(4 Suppl):S99-123.e1219285216
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2009;6 Suppl 1:S113-2319998857
Cites: J Urban Health. 2010 Mar;87(2):189-9820174879
Cites: J Epidemiol. 2010;20(4):277-8620472982
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Sep;93(9):1552-812948979
PubMed ID
21241470 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biological monitoring of exposure to organophosphate pesticides in children living in peri-urban areas of the Province of Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170625
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 Aug;79(7):568-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Mathieu Valcke
Onil Samuel
Michèle Bouchard
Pierre Dumas
Denis Belleville
Claude Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Direction des Risques Biologiques, Environnementaux et Occupationnels, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, 4835, Christophe-Colomb, Bureau 200,, H2J 3G8, Montreal, QC, Canada. mathieu.valcke@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 Aug;79(7):568-77
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Organophosphates - urine
Pesticides
Quebec
Suburban Population
Abstract
This study was undertaken to assess the exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides in children from peri-urban areas of the Province of Quebec, Canada, through measurements of semi-specific alkylphosphate (AP) metabolites.
Eighty-nine children aged between 3 and 7 years were recruited via pamphlets sent to day-care centers. A first morning urine void was collected early in the spring of 2003 prior to summertime, which is the usual period of outdoor pesticide use. During summertime, up to five more first morning voids were repeatedly collected, at 72-h intervals, over a 13-day period. The potential determinants of exposure were assessed by a questionnaire at the time of urine collection.
Methylphosphate metabolites were detectable in 98.2% of the 442 samples analyzed while ethylphosphates were detected in 86.7% of the samples. The geometric mean concentration (GM) of the total AP metabolites was 61.7 mug/g creatinine (range: 2.7-1967.3 mug/g creatinine). The difference in urinary AP concentrations between samples collected during spring and summer was non-significant (P=0.08). There was also no significant difference in the mean AP concentrations between summer samples of individuals living in municipalities where outdoor pesticide use is or is not restricted (P=0.25). However, the presence of a pet in the house was associated with an increase in AP concentrations during spraying season (P=0.02). Pesticides were seldom used, as reported by the questionnaire. A significant correlation was also observed (P
PubMed ID
16491402 View in PubMed
Less detail

95 records – page 1 of 10.