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235 records – page 1 of 24.

The 2-year course following detoxification treatment of substance abuse: the possible influence of psychiatric comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11106
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K. Tómasson
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Landspítalinn, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the course and outcome in a nationwide representative sample (n = 351) of treatment-seeking substance users over a 28-month period was studied prospectively. The patients were administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and a questionnaire on drinking history. At 16 and 28 months after admission the patients returned a questionnaire on drinking history and mental health. In cases of those lacking information on either follow-up (45%), details on drinking status was obtained from informants. Completely abstinent were 16%. Generalized anxiety disorder and/or social phobia at the index admission predicted abstinence during the follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.25], whereas onset of alcoholism among these patients after age 25 years predicted a worse prognosis (OR = 13.5). Also increasing number of social consequences related to abuse (OR = 1.3) and drinking more than the median (OR = 2.1) predicted a poor outcome. The abstinent group had significantly better mental health at follow-up. The patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders at admission were worse at follow-up. Although substance use disorders and comorbid psychiatric disorders have to a certain degree separate courses, there is nevertheless significant interaction between them. Early treatment and recognition of comorbid psychiatric disorders among substance abusers is necessary.
PubMed ID
9477012 View in PubMed
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Abuse of indigenous psilocybin mushrooms: a new fashion and some psychiatric complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248553
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1978 Jun;132:602-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
C. Hyde
G. Glancy
P. Omerod
D. Hall
G S Taylor
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1978 Jun;132:602-4
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basidiomycota
Hallucinations - chemically induced
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - chemically induced
Psilocybine
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Abstract
The use for hallucinogenic purposes of an indigenous mushroom, Psilocybe semilanceata indigenous to Britain is reported in three patients. Typical psychedelic, transient psychotic and more prolonged schizophrenia-like states were seen, with sympathomimetic signs noted in two cases, in one being prolonged. Enquiry about such mushroom abuse should be considered in individuals presenting to medical or psychiatric emergency clinics.
PubMed ID
566144 View in PubMed
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Accounts of HIV seroconversion among substance-using gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148150
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1395-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jeffrey P Aguinaldo
Ted Myers
Karen Ryder
Dennis J Haubrich
Liviana Calzavara
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. jaguinaldo@wlu.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1395-406
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality
Case-Control Studies
HIV Seropositivity - psychology - transmission
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Abstract
Statistical associations between substance use and seroconversion among gay and bisexual men abound. However, these associations often ignore men's own interpretations of their seroconversion. Using in-depth interviews with gay and bisexual men who reported using drugs or alcohol at the time of their seroconversion, we identify how these men explain the events that led to HIV transmission. Whereas a small minority of respondents reported substance use to explain their seroconversion, the majority reported three competing explanations. These participants claimed that they lacked sufficient knowledge about the behavioral risks that led to their seroconversion; that their decision to engage in unsafe sex was because of negative personal affect; and that they "trusted the wrong person." We link these findings to prevention and suggest that gay and bisexual men who use substances for recreational purposes will benefit from prevention efforts designed to address issues of gay and bisexual men rather than substance-using men.
PubMed ID
19805802 View in PubMed
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[A comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation program for drug addicts at the Dnepropetrovsk Province Drug Abuse Clinic]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11485
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jan-Feb;(1-2):159-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Sauta
S V Rokutov
V A Lavrenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jan-Feb;(1-2):159-62
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Combined Modality Therapy
English Abstract
Humans
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Ukraine
Abstract
On the basis of the experience gained in the treatment of patients who are drug addicts a complex treatment-and-rehabilitation programme has been developed and adopted. It is a psychotherapeutically--oriented programme that includes the following steps: selection of patients, promotion of health of the family, staging, participation of social workers--former patients. The end objective is to achieve a lasting remission in addicted patients, promotion of health of their relatives and normalization of family relations. Such an approach to solving the problem differs from nonmedicamentous methods widely employed now in the Ukraine and UIS republics, which have not been associated with demonstrable effects in treatment and, more important, rehabilitation of addicted persons.
PubMed ID
7483531 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture treatment for women with concurrent substance use and anxiety/depression: an effective alternative therapy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164364
Source
Fam Community Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;30(2):112-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christine M A Courbasson
Alicia Araujo de Sorkin
Berit Dullerud
Lucy Van Wyk
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Christine_Courbasson@camh.net
Source
Fam Community Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;30(2):112-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture, Ear
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - psychology - therapy
Anxiety Disorders - complications - prevention & control
Depressive Disorder - complications - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Personality Inventory
Self Efficacy
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This exploratory study evaluated the benefits of adding auricular acupuncture to a 21-day outpatient structured psychoeducational treatment program for women with concurrent substance use problems, anxiety, and depression. Women receiving acupuncture (n = 185) reported having reduced physiological cravings for substances, felt significantly less depressed, less anxious, and were better able to reflect on and resolve difficulties than women in the control group (n = 101). It was found that auricular acupuncture, as an adjunct therapy to a comprehensive psychoeducational treatment program for women with addictions, shows promise in being an effective, more viable treatment alternative to anxiolytics.
PubMed ID
19241647 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Psychosom. 1994;41(1-4):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Zinchenko
Author Affiliation
Saybrook Institute, San Francisco, CA 94133.
Source
Int J Psychosom. 1994;41(1-4):87-92
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arousal
Behavior, Addictive - psychology - rehabilitation
Breathing Exercises
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Internal-External Control
Psychotherapy
Russia
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
PubMed ID
7843873 View in PubMed
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Addiction is a disease: we must change our attitudes toward addicts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128919
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Feb 7;184(2):155
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-2012
Author
Matthew B Stanbrook
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Feb 7;184(2):155
Date
Feb-7-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Drug Users - psychology
Humans
Stereotyping
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Notes
Cites: Clin Neuropharmacol. 2009 Sep-Oct;32(5):269-7619834992
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Dec 13;183(18):E1334-4422042991
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Dec 13;183(18):2085-622042997
Comment In: CMAJ. 2012 Sep 18;184(13):149922988291
Comment In: CMAJ. 2012 Apr 3;184(6):67922473931
PubMed ID
22158399 View in PubMed
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Addiction is a mental disorder, best managed in a (public) mental health setting--but our system is failing us.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163757
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;52(3):167-9: discussion 174
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Charl Els
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton. cels@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;52(3):167-9: discussion 174
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospitalization
Humans
Mental Health Services - standards
Public Health
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
PubMed ID
17479524 View in PubMed
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"A different atmosphere of love": a qualitative study of the experiences of participants in Evangelical substance user rehabilitation programs in the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115826
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Apr;48(6):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Kenneth M Stoltzfus
David Cecil
Author Affiliation
Social Sciences Department, LCC International University, Klaipeda, Lithuania. kstoltzfus@lcc.lt
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Apr;48(6):421-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Christianity
Drug Users - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Qualitative Research
Russia
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
This article explores the lived experiences of individuals who have participated in faith-based substance user rehabilitation programs in the Russian Federation. The Russian Federation has high rates of alcohol and opioid dependence and a dearth of professional treatment options. In the post-Soviet period, Evangelical Christian groups have developed substance user rehabilitation programs to attempt to address substance use and its related problems. Data were collected during 2010 via focus group interviews with participants in three Evangelical rehabilitation programs in the Volga region of the Russian Federation. Themes emerging from the qualitative data analysis process were classified into three broad categories: Typical Day, Personal Background/Decision to Enter Rehabilitation, and Helpful Aspects of Rehabilitation Process.
Notes
Erratum In: Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Sep;48(12):1218
PubMed ID
23461666 View in PubMed
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Aetiological and precipiating factors in wife battering. A psychosocial study of battered wives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12480
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1988 Mar;77(3):338-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
B. Bergman
G. Larsson
B. Brismar
M. Klang
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1988 Mar;77(3):338-45
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Family
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Spouse Abuse
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Sweden
Violence
Abstract
Forty-nine women who attended a surgical emergency department after being battered are the subjects of this prospective study. The childhood and adolescence of the women had been marked by abuse and violence in the parental home. Most of the women had suffered prolonged, repeated battering. Fifty-one per cent of the women and 88% of their male assailants were considered to be heavy consumers of alcohol and in over half of the cases of battering both the man and the women had been drinking. In most cases the women's own children were present when the mother was beaten. One third of the women stated that they were highly dependent on the man in question emotionally. It is concluded that social heredity, heavy consumption of alcohol and emotional dependence on the male assailant are major reasons for the woman's inability to break away from a relationship characterized by repeated battering.
PubMed ID
3394536 View in PubMed
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235 records – page 1 of 24.