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231 records – page 1 of 24.

[40 nurses reported for abuse every year].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240804
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1984 Feb 29;84(9):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-29-1984
Author
P. Kristensen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1984 Feb 29;84(9):4-6
Date
Feb-29-1984
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Denmark
Humans
Licensure, Nursing
Nurses
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
PubMed ID
6562777 View in PubMed
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Source
Int Z Klin Pharmakol Ther Toxikol. 1968 Jul;1(5):381-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1968

Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland: diverse problems, diverse perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130545
Source
Addiction. 2012 Oct;107(10):1741-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Pekka Hakkarainen
Kalervo Kiianmaa
Kimmo Kuoppasalmi
Christoffer Tigerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland. pekka.hakkarainen@thl.fi
Source
Addiction. 2012 Oct;107(10):1741-6
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration - trends
Biomedical Research - organization & administration - trends
Creativity
Finland
Forecasting
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Abstract
The Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction started operations on 1 January 2009, when the National Institute of Public Health (KTL) and the National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES) were merged. The newly formed institute, called the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), operates under the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The scope of the research and preventive work conducted in the Department covers alcohol, drugs, tobacco and gambling issues. The two main tasks of the Department are (i) to research, produce and disseminate information on alcohol and drugs, substance use, addictions and their social and health-related effects and (ii) to develop prevention and good practices with a view to counteracting the onset and development of alcohol and drug problems and the damaging effects of smoking and other addictions. The number of staff hovers at approximately 60 people. The Department is organized into three units, one specialized in social sciences (the Alcohol and Drug Research Unit), another in laboratory analytics (the Alcohol and Drug Analytics Unit) and the third primarily in preventive work (the Addiction Prevention Unit). These units incorporate a rich variety and long traditions of both research and preventive work. The mixture of different disciplines creates good opportunities for interdisciplinary research projects and collaboration within the Department. Also, the fact that in the same administrative context there are both researchers and people specialized in preventive work opens up interesting possibilities for combining efforts from these two branches. Nationally, the Department is a key player in all its fields of interest. It engages in a great deal of cooperation both nationally and internationally, and among its strengths are the high-quality, regularly collected long-term data sets.
PubMed ID
21992550 View in PubMed
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[A devoted parliamentary debate. "Narcotics are an iceberg--we can only see the top of the mountain"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254940
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Jan 3;70(1):25-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-3-1973
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Jan 3;70(1):25-6
Date
Jan-3-1973
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Crime
Drug and Narcotic Control
Humans
Jurisprudence
Legislation, Drug
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Sweden
PubMed ID
4683220 View in PubMed
Less detail

[AIDS. Government ready with 2-year plan against HIV infection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8711
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1987 Aug 26;87(35):14-5, 20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1987

[Alternative treatment for young drug abusers: National Center for Prevention--a presentation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254704
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1973 Apr 30;93(12):829-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1973

"A magnet for curious adolescents": the perceived dangers of an open drug scene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93377
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Dec;19(6):459-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Sandberg Sveinung
Pedersen Willy
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Bergen, Rosenbergsgaten 39, 5015 Bergen, Norway. sveinung.sandberg@sos.uib.no
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Dec;19(6):459-66
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Behavior, Addictive
Drug and Narcotic Control
Government Regulation
Health Policy
Humans
Norway
Public Health
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Social Distance
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
During the summer of 2004 the police closed Plata, an open drug scene in the midst of Oslo. The most important argument for the closure was that the drug scene made it easier for curious, city-dwelling adolescents to start using drugs. This research sought to assess this assumption. Ethnographic research methods including twenty 2-hr field observations and qualitative semi-structures interviews were employed. Interviews were conducted with 30 adolescents in the centre of Oslo, as well as with 10 former drug users, three police officers and three field workers. We were also given access to police statistics and authorised to do our own analysis of the material. The most important result was that adolescents seemed rather to avoid than to be attracted to this open drug scene in Oslo. Based on the presentation of qualitative data we suggest that this was due to the social definition of the drug scene. Because they experienced a great social distance between themselves and the regulars at the open drug scene, adolescents seemed to avoid Plata. Moreover, the scene was symbolically associated with heroin and injection as the route of administration, which had low prestige among the adolescents. Despite these findings, adolescents' recruitment to drug use was the key issue in the political debate following the closure. We point to the shared rhetorical interest among important institutional actors in framing the issue in this way. The argument was also embedded in widely shared public representations of adolescents and drug users as passive and irrational.
PubMed ID
18378132 View in PubMed
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231 records – page 1 of 24.