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35 records – page 1 of 4.

Acute and chronic drug abuse emergencies in Metropolitan Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244766
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 Feb;16(2):283-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1981
Author
E M Sellers
J A Marshman
H L Kaplan
H G Giles
B M Kapur
U. Busto
S M MacLeod
C. Stapleton
F. Sealey
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 Feb;16(2):283-303
Date
Feb-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Barbiturates - poisoning
Benzodiazepines - poisoning
Emergencies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Salicylates - poisoning
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Suicide, Attempted
Abstract
From 3,548 drug overdose or abuse cases presenting at 21 Metropolitan Toronto hospitals' Emergency departments, data concerning demographic and medical characteristics, investigative and management procedures, drug analysis services, and disposition of patients were collected. Of the 3,548 cases, 2,723 (77%) were acute overdose and 816 (23%) were drug abuse. Drug overdose was more common than drug abuse for both sexes, but was more characteristic of females. The drugs most frequently alleged ingested were benzodiazepines (34%), ethanol (32%), salicylates (16%), and barbiturates (14%). The frequency with which particular classes of drugs are alleged in overdose corresponds closely to the frequency of prescribing these drugs in Ontario.
PubMed ID
7275381 View in PubMed
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Addiction: its nature, spread and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68189
Source
Isr Ann Psychiatr Relat Discip. 1971 Aug;9(2):155-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1971

Adverse events after naloxone treatment of episodes of suspected acute opioid overdose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53341
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2004 Feb;11(1):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Ingebjørg Buajordet
Anne-Cathrine Naess
Dag Jacobsen
Odd Brørs
Author Affiliation
Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology Unit, Clinical Chemistry Department, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingebjorg.buajordet@legemiddelverket.no
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2004 Feb;11(1):19-23
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confusion - chemically induced
Emergency Medical Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Headache - chemically induced
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Naloxone - adverse effects
Narcotic Antagonists - adverse effects
Narcotics - poisoning
Nausea - chemically induced
Norway - epidemiology
Overdose - drug therapy
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seizures - chemically induced
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Tachycardia - chemically induced
Tremor - chemically induced
Vomiting - chemically induced
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: An increasing and serious heroin overdose problem in Oslo has mandated the increasing out-of-hospital use of naloxone administered by paramedics. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies and characteristics of adverse events related to this out-of-hospital administration by paramedics. METHODS: A one-year prospective observational study from February 1998 to January 1999 was performed in patients suspected to be acutely overdosed by an opioid. A total of 1192 episodes treated with naloxone administered by the Emergency Medical Service system in Oslo, were included. The main outcome variable was adverse events observed immediately after the administration of naloxone. RESULTS: The mean age of patients included was 32.6 years, and 77% were men. Adverse events suspected to be related to naloxone treatment were reported in 45% of episodes. The most common adverse events were related to opioid withdrawal (33%) such as gastrointestinal disorders, aggressiveness, tachycardia, shivering, sweating and tremor. Cases of confusion/restlessness (32%) might be related either to opioid withdrawal or to the effect of the heroin in combination with other drugs. Headache and seizures (25%) were probably related to hypoxia. Most events were non-serious. In three episodes (0.3%) the patients were hospitalized because of adverse events. CONCLUSION: Although adverse events were common among patients treated for opioid overdose in an out-of-hospital setting, serious complications were rare. Out-of-hospital naloxone treatment by paramedics seems to save several lives a year without a high risk of serious complications.
PubMed ID
15167188 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug dependency in Saskatchewan, 1969-1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241757
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1983 Jul;44(4):630-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
C. D'Arcy
G. Bold
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1983 Jul;44(4):630-46
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospitalization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
The demographic characteristics and the trends in health care utilization of alcohol- and drug-dependent residents of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan from 1969 to 1974 are examined.
PubMed ID
6632882 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol and narcotic problems among conscripted youth]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13169
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1977 Apr 20;97(11):511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-1977

[Are the responses of clients with psychiatric and addiction disorders using services for the homeless valid?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159405
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;52(12):798-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Jean-Pierre Bonin
Louise Fournier
Régis Blais
Michel Perreault
Noé Djawn White
Author Affiliation
Universit6 de Montr6al, Faculté des Sciences infirmi6res, Montréal, Québec. jean-pierre.bonin@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;52(12):798-802
Date
Dec-2007
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Questionnaires
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
To verify the validity of self-reported data on service use from clients with mental or substance abuse disorders in Montreal and Quebec services for homeless individuals.
To compare the self-reported data from the Enquête chez les personnes itinérantes (Fournier, 2001) on health service use with official data from Quebec health services (MEDECHO and RAMQ).
The analysis shows a moderate-to-high level of concordance between the self-reported and the official data. Almost every item analyzed presents moderate but significant intraclass correlation coefficients for general and psychiatric hospitalization and use of psychiatric medication, but lower and nonsignificant coefficients for medical hospitalization. Participant characteristics such as mental disorders, homeless status, and substance abuse problems do not seem to have an impact on data validity.
The answers on health service use from individuals with mental health problems, homeless status, or substance abuse problems are generally valid in the results presented. Thus the self-reported data from these individiuals seems to be a generally valid source of data and an affordable one for research on service use or other domains.
PubMed ID
18186180 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid substance use disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127356
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):38-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Serge Beaulieu
Sybille Saury
Jitender Sareen
Jacques Tremblay
Christian G Schütz
Roger S McIntyre
Ayal Schaffer
Author Affiliation
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Serge.Beaulieu@McGill.ca
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):38-55
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antimanic Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Canada
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Psychotherapy - methods
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Mood disorders, especially bipolar disorder (BD), frequently are associated with substance use disorders (SUDs). There are well-designed trials for the treatment of SUDs in the absence of a comorbid condition. However, one cannot generalize these study results to individuals with comorbid mood disorders, because therapeutic efficacy and/or safety and tolerability profiles may differ with the presence of the comorbid disorder. Therefore, a review of the available evidence is needed to provide guidance to clinicians facing the challenges of treating patients with comorbid mood disorders and SUDs.
We reviewed the literature published between January 1966 and November 2010 by using the following search strategies on PubMed. Search terms were bipolar disorder or depressive disorder, major (to exclude depression, postpartum; dysthymic disorder; cyclothymic disorder; and seasonal affective disorder) cross-referenced with alcohol or drug or substance and abuse or dependence or disorder. When possible, a level of evidence was determined for each treatment using the framework of previous Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments recommendations. The lack of evidence-based literature limited the authors' ability to generate treatment recommendations that were strictly evidence based, and as such, recommendations were often based on the authors' opinion.
Even though a large number of treatments were investigated for alcohol use disorder (AUD), none have been sufficiently studied to justify the attribution of level 1 evidence in comorbid AUD with major depressive disorder (MDD) or BD. The available data allows us to generate first-choice recommendations for AUD comorbid with MDD and only third-choice recommendations for cocaine, heroin, and opiate SUD comorbid with MDD. No recommendations were possible for cannabis, amphetamines, methamphetamines, or polysubstance SUD comorbid with MDD. First-choice recommendations were possible for alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine SUD comorbid with BD and only second-choice recommendations for heroin, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and polysubstance SUD comorbid with BD. No recommendations were possible for opiate SUD comorbid with BD. Finally, psychotherapies certainly are considered an essential component of the overall treatment of SUDs comorbid with mood disorders. However, further well-designed studies are needed in order to properly assess their potential role in specific SUDs comorbid with a mood disorder.
Although certain treatments show promise in the management of mood disorders comorbid with SUDs, additional well-designed studies are needed to properly assess their potential role in specific SUDs comorbid with a mood disorder.
PubMed ID
22303521 View in PubMed
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Chemical dependence in Canada: a view from the hill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242081
Source
NIDA Res Monogr. 1983 Apr;43:10-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983

Commentary: quality of alcohol, drug, and mental health services for American Indian children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10398
Source
Am J Med Qual. 2000 Jul-Aug;15(4):148-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
D K Novins
C M Fleming
J. Beals
S M Manson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of the National Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver 80210, USA.douglas.novins@uchsc.edu
Source
Am J Med Qual. 2000 Jul-Aug;15(4):148-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Demography
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Prevalence
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
American Indian children and adolescents suffer from a high prevalence of alcohol, drug, and mental (ADM) disorders. Unfortunately, the systems of services for these children and youth have never been able to address adequately their mental health needs. Thus, the revolutionary changes now taking place within these service systems, in particular the marked increase in the direct provision of services by Indian tribes and organizations, provides a unique opportunity to address these historical shortcomings. In this paper, we describe our existing knowledge concerning the quality of ADM services for American Indian children and adolescents and their critical sociodemographic, sociocultural, and epidemiologic contexts. We then consider the implications of these studies for improving the quality of care as well as its measurement and monitoring.
PubMed ID
10948787 View in PubMed
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Comparing apples and oranges: how do patient characteristics and treatment goals vary between different forms of psychotherapy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95271
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2009 Sep;82(Pt 3):323-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Philips Björn
Author Affiliation
Centre for Dependency Disorders, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden. bjorn.philips@sll.se
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2009 Sep;82(Pt 3):323-36
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Comorbidity
Family Therapy - methods
Female
Goals
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Psychotherapy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim is to investigate whether different modalities and orientations of psychotherapy diverge with regard to patient characteristics and treatment goals, in a naturalistic setting for patients with substance use disorders. DESIGN: All psychotherapies (N=262) during a year were surveyed at the Centre for Dependency Disorders, Stockholm County Council. Data were collected from the psychotherapists (N=38). METHODS: A therapist questionnaire was used, covering the topics of interest. Data regarding problems and goals were categorized using a qualitative clustering method. Differences between therapy formats were analysed using statistical methods. RESULTS: The prevalence of psychological problems among the patients was high (88%). Patients in cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and family therapy (FT) had less severe psychological problems than patients in the other psychotherapy formats. With regard to treatment goals, FT focused on improved family relations, group therapies on relational improvements, psychodynamic therapies on insight and improved functioning, while CBT focused on behaviour change and improved motivation for change. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest a shortcoming of the aim of the EST movement to consider reduction of target symptom as the only relevant treatment goal and to compare the efficacy of different treatments in this regard.
PubMed ID
19358748 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.