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Addiction Research Centres and the Nurturing of Creativity. Substance abuse research in a modern health care centre: the case of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143386
Source
Addiction. 2011 Apr;106(4):689-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Jürgen Rehm
Norman Giesbrecht
Louis Gliksman
Kathryn Graham
Anh D Le
Robert E Mann
Robin Room
Brian Rush
Rachel F Tyndale
Samantha Wells
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. jtrehm@aol.com
Source
Addiction. 2011 Apr;106(4):689-97
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Foundations - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Policy
Research - organization & administration
Research Support as Topic
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is one of the premier centres for research related to substance use and addiction. This research began more than 50 years ago with the Addiction Research Foundation (ARF), an organization that contributed significantly to knowledge about the aetiology, treatment and prevention of substance use, addiction and related harm. After the merger of the ARF with three other institutions in 1998, research on substance use continued, with an additional focus on comorbid substance use and other mental health disorders. In the present paper, we describe the structure of funding and organization and selected current foci of research. We argue for the continuation of this successful model of integrating basic, epidemiological, clinical, health service and prevention research under the roof of a health centre.
PubMed ID
20491727 View in PubMed
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Adolescent initiation into drug-taking behavior: comparisons over a 5-year interval.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6195
Source
Int J Addict. 1991 Mar;26(3):267-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
B. Segal
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska, Anchorage.
Source
Int J Addict. 1991 Mar;26(3):267-79
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health education
Humans
Incidence
Male
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Acquisition curves for six substances were compared for adolescents in two samples separated by a 5-year interval. Individual variations in initiation ages were found for different substances, but the general pattern of exposures to drugs was essentially stable over the time interval. The findings suggest that there appears to be a range of first experience with drugs that extends from 13 to 16 years. Special emphasis was given to the implications which the findings have for education and intervention programs, and for further research.
PubMed ID
1889925 View in PubMed
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Age-related health risk behaviors of adolescents with physical disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180059
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2004;49(2):132-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Catherine A Steele
Ilze V Kalnins
Beth E Rossen
Douglas W Biggar
Joseph A Bortolussi
Jeffrey W Jutai
Author Affiliation
Bloorview MacMillan Centre, Toronto.
Source
Soz Praventivmed. 2004;49(2):132-41
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child
Disabled Children - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Male
Ontario
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To investigate age-related differences in health risk behaviors in 11-12-, 13-14-, and 15-16-year-old adolescents with physical disabilities.
Health survey data from 319 adolescents with physical disabilities were compared with the same data from 7,020 adolescents in a national sample.
Significant age-related differences were found for having tried smoking, smoking, having tasted an alcoholic drink, having been drunk, and using prescription drugs for recreational purposes. However, changes were modest and engagement of 15-16-year-old adolescents with physical disabilities was similar to 11-12-year-olds in the general population. Analysis of associations between disability status and health risk behaviors while controlling for age and sex showed that disability is associated with a lower likelihood of having tried smoking, smoking, having tasted an alcoholic drink, drinking, having been drunk, having used drugs, having used prescription drugs for recreational purposes, and eating sweets; a higher likelihood of not engaging in physical exercise, not eating fresh produce, and eating high-fat foods; and non-significant for seat-belt use.
Health promotion programs about health risk behaviours designed for adolescents in the general population may not be appropriate for adolescents with physical disabilities.
PubMed ID
15150865 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug use by students from western Canada in grades 6 through 12 (1992): have there been any changes over the past five years?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218256
Source
Int J Addict. 1994 May;29(7):829-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
K W Hindmarsh
S. Porter-Serviss
E E Opheim
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Int J Addict. 1994 May;29(7):829-35
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Attitude
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Promotion - standards
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Social Adjustment
Students
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Over 8,000 students in Grades 6 through 12, from Western Canada and the North West Territories were surveyed for the prevalence of licit and illicit drug use over a 1-year period ending June 30, 1992. The results were compared with three previous studies dating back to just over 5 years. While there was a slight decline between 1987 and 1990, the present study reveals a slight reverse in this trend. These results emphasize the need for continued education and perhaps the need for determining the reasons for use by this age group.
PubMed ID
8050830 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco use among Canadian youth: do we need more multi-substance prevention programming?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144581
Source
J Prim Prev. 2010 Jun;31(3):99-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Scott T Leatherdale
Rashid Ahmed
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Studies and Surveillance, Cancer Care Ontario, 620 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L7, Canada. scott.leatherdale@cancercare.on.ca
Source
J Prim Prev. 2010 Jun;31(3):99-108
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Risk-Taking
School Health Services
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Data from the Canadian Youth Smoking Survey (n = 27,030 in 2006; n = 16,705 in 2004; n = 11,757 in 2002) were used to examine changes in the prevalence and comorbid use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana over time and examine if demographic factors and binge drinking are associated with comorbid substance use among youth. Alcohol was the most prevalent substance used, and it was rare to find youth who had used tobacco or marijuana without also having tried alcohol. Youth who reported binge drinking were substantially more likely to also have tried tobacco and/or marijuana. These data suggest that multi-substance prevention programs are required for youth populations.
PubMed ID
20352492 View in PubMed
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American Indian substance use: the hazards for substance use initiation and progression for adolescents aged 14 to 20 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3710
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2004 Mar;43(3):316-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Douglas K Novins
Anna E Barón
Author Affiliation
National Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. douglas.novins@uchsc.edu
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2004 Mar;43(3):316-24
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Survival Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the risks and risk factors for substance use initiation and progression among a large sample of American Indian (AI) adolescents. METHOD: Data came from surveys completed by 2,356 AI adolescents aged 14 to 20 years who participated in two or more consecutive waves of a longitudinal study between 1993 and 1996 (response rate 74%). Discrete-time survival analysis was used to describe the risks and risk factors for substance use initiation and progression. RESULTS: The risk for initiating use of any substance accelerated in early adolescence and peaked at age 18. The risk for progression from use of alcohol, marijuana, and/or inhalants to the use of other illicit drugs (e.g., cocaine) increased over the first 4.5 years after initiating substance use, then diminished in subsequent years. The risk of substance use initiation and progression varied across the four participating communities and by season of the year. Compared to adolescents who initiated substance use with alcohol only, adolescents who initiated substance use with marijuana or inhalants were more likely to progress to use other illicit drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Prevention programs for AI communities should be designed to address these community, age, and seasonal variations in the risks for substance use initiation and progression.
PubMed ID
15076265 View in PubMed
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An all-embracing problem description. The Swedish drug issue as a political catalyst 1982-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112855
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 Nov;24(6):558-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Johan Edman
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: johan.edman@sorad.su.se.
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 Nov;24(6):558-65
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consensus
Drug Users - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug and Narcotic Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Policy Making
Politics
Social Control Policies - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Social Problems - legislation & jurisprudence
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This article examines the political formulation and ideological solution of the Swedish drug problem in 1982-2000. How was the drug problem described in the Swedish parliament at the time? How serious was the problem and what solutions were proposed? What were the ideological implications of the problem description, and how was the general political and ideological solution formulated?
The empirical basis for the textual analysis consists of parliamentary bills, government bills and parliamentary records discussing the drug issue during the years 1982-2000.
In the prevailing spirit of consensus in the Swedish parliament at the time, both left-wing and right-wing parties portrayed drugs as a threat to the nation, people and the welfare state. Still, as the ideological dimension kept growing stronger, the drug question functioned even better as an arena for political discussions and ideological positions than in the 1970s.
Compared to previous decades, the problem description broadened during the 1980s and 1990s, and the drug problem could be used to support arguments on almost any topic. The drug problem became a highly politicized issue about whom or what to change when the individual and the society clashed, but also about what the individual and/or society should be changed into.
PubMed ID
23790617 View in PubMed
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The anti-doping hot-line, a means to capture the abuse of doping agents in the Swedish society and a new service function in clinical pharmacology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45888
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Nov;59(8-9):571-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Ann-Charlotte Eklöf
Ann-Mari Thurelius
Mats Garle
Anders Rane
Folke Sjöqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Huddinge University Hospital, 14185 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Nov;59(8-9):571-7
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anabolic Agents - adverse effects
Androgens - adverse effects
Doping in Sports - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fitness Centers - statistics & numerical data
Hotlines - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Steroids - adverse effects
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
With the support of the Swedish National Institute of Health a national information service was started in 1993 aiming to capture the abuse of doping agents in the general public. It was organized as a telephone service, called the Anti-Doping Hot-Line, from our department and managed by trained nurses co-operating with clinical pharmacologists. Important information collected about all callers (anonymous) was: date of call, its origin, category of caller, doping experience and main question being asked. Abusers were asked about their age, sex, affiliation, abused drug(s), duration of abuse, habit of administration and adverse reactions (ADRs). Between October 1993 and December 2000 25,835 calls were received with a peak during spring and autumn. Most calls (12,400) came from non-abusers, 60% being males. Callers connected with gyms represented the largest group (30%). Most calls about specific drugs concerned anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). Other drugs or products included ephedrine, clenbuterol and creatine. The most commonly abused anabolic steroids were testosterone, nandrolone-decanoate, methandienone and stanozolol. The ten most commonly reported ADRs of AAS were aggressiveness (835), depression (829), acne (770), gynecomastia (637), anxiousness (637), potency problems (413), testicular atrophy (404), sleep disorders (328), fluid retention (318) and mood disturbances (302). Female side effects included menstruation disturbances, hair growth in the face, lower voice and enlarged clitoris. During the period 1996-200, totally 4339 persons reported about 10,800 side effects. This figure should be compared with the very low number of ADRs (27) reported by prescribers to the Swedish ADR committee during the same period. Abuse of doping agents appears to be a new public health problem that needs detection, medical care and prevention.
PubMed ID
13680032 View in PubMed
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Assessment of health impacts of decreased smoking prevalence in Copenhagen: Application of the DYNAMO-HIA model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269659
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Jul;42(5):409-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Astrid Ledgaard Holm
Henrik Brønnum-Hansen
Kirstine Magtengaard Robinson
Finn Diderichsen
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Jul;42(5):409-16
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Mortality, Premature
Prevalence
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
Tobacco smoking is among the leading risk factors for chronic disease and early death in developed countries, including Denmark, where smoking causes 14% of the disease burden. In Denmark, many public health interventions, including smoking prevention, are undertaken by the municipalities, but models to estimate potential health effects of local interventions are lacking. The aim of the current study was to model the effects of decreased smoking prevalence in Copenhagen, Denmark.
The DYNAMO-HIA model was applied to the population of Copenhagen, by using health survey data and data from Danish population registers. We modelled the effects of four intervention scenarios aimed at different target groups, compared to a reference scenario. The potential effects of each scenario were modelled until 2040.
A combined scenario affecting both initiation rates among youth, and cessation and re-initiation rates among adults, which reduced the smoking prevalence to 4% by 2025, would have large beneficial effects on incidence and prevalence of smoking-related diseases and mortality. Health benefits could also be obtained through interventions targeting only cessation or re-initiation rates, whereas an intervention targeting only initiation among youth had marginal effects on morbidity and mortality within the modelled time frame.
By modifying the DYNAMO-HIA model, we were able to estimate the potential health effects of four interventions to reduce smoking prevalence in the population of Copenhagen. The effect of the interventions on future public health depended on population subgroup(s) targeted, duration of implementation and intervention reach.
PubMed ID
24812258 View in PubMed
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Building partnerships between indigenous communities and universities: Lessons learned in HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89856
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S77-882
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Baldwin, JA
Johnson, JL
Benally, CC
Author Affiliation
Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, 13 201 Bruce B. Downs, Blvd., MDC 56, Tampa, FL 33 612, USA. jbaldwin@health.usf.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S77-882
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Public Health Professional
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health Services Research - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Research Personnel - education - supply & distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Many HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention studies in American Indian and Alaska Native communities have been directed by academic researchers with little community input. We examined the challenges in conducting HIV/AIDS-related research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities and the benefits of changing the research paradigm to a community-based participatory model. The lessons we learned illustrate that the research process should be a cyclical one with continual involvement by community members. Steps in the process include (1) building and sustaining collaborative relationships, (2) planning the program together, (3) implementing and evaluating the program in culturally acceptable ways, and (4) disseminating research findings from a tribal perspective. These steps can enhance the long-term capacity of the community to conduct HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention research.
PubMed ID
19246672 View in PubMed
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85 records – page 1 of 9.