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[Acute nonfatal poisonings by drug preparations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226125
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1991 Jul-Sep;34(3):36-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M I Krut'
G N Zaraf'iants
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1991 Jul-Sep;34(3):36-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Factors
Drug Overdose - epidemiology - etiology
Forensic Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Poison Control Centers - statistics & numerical data
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Acute non-lethal poisonings with drugs within the period of 10 years according to archives data of Toxicological center and medicolegal department of victims' examination in Leningrad medicolegal expert Bureau were analysed. Number of drug poisoning cases increased two-fold and formed 76% of all poisoning cases. Tranquilizers, then antihistaminic, neuroleptic and hypotensive (clofelin) agents were used most often. Drugs were taken with suicidal attempt or with the aim of getting "alcoholic" effect. Poisonings among women were registered three times more often than among men.
PubMed ID
1836904 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol and drug consumption in students exposed to the Dawson College shooting: a gender-based analysis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125439
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;57(4):245-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Natasha Dugal
Stéphane Guay
Richard Boyer
Alain Lesage
Monique Séguin
Pierre Bleau
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec. natasha.dugal@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;57(4):245-53
Date
Apr-2012
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotropic Drugs - pharmacology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Students - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Abstract
To study alcohol and drug addiction incidence in students exposed to the Dawson College shooting within the 18 months following the event, to identify the precursors of a psychoactive substance addiction development while considering the severity of event exposure, and to examine whether alcohol use, 18 months after the event, is related to any of the various posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom groups.
The population of this study was comprised of all the Dawson College students at the time of the event. Analyses were conducted with 854 students enrolled in the college at the time of the shooting.
Five per cent of women and 7% of men showed, for the first time in their life, a problem with substance addiction following the shooting. In men, young age, lifetime suicidal ideation, and having seen the killer during the shooting are the main precursors of incident accident cases. None of the studied precursors were significant in women. Men and women were also different in terms of PTSD symptoms predicting alcohol use 18 months after the shooting.
The study highlights the importance of considering a person's sex when studying their psychoactive substance use following a trauma.
PubMed ID
22480590 View in PubMed
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Analgesic overuse among subjects with headache, neck, and low-back pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52005
Source
Neurology. 2004 May 11;62(9):1540-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-11-2004
Author
J-A Zwart
G. Dyb
K. Hagen
S. Svebak
L J Stovner
J. Holmen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. john-anker.zwart@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Neurology. 2004 May 11;62(9):1540-4
Date
May-11-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Analgesics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Headache - drug therapy - epidemiology
Headache Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Low Back Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Neck Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence of chronic headache (> or =15 days/month) associated with analgesic overuse in relation to age and gender and the association between analgesic overuse and chronic pain (i.e., migraine, nonmigrainous headache, neck and low-back pain). METHODS: In the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 1995 to 1997 (HUNT-2), a total of 51,383 subjects responded to headache questions (Head-HUNT), of which 51,050 completed questions related to musculoskeletal symptoms and 49,064 questions regarding the use of analgesics. RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic headache associated with analgesic use daily or almost daily for > or =1 month was 1% (1.3% for women and 0.7% for men) and for analgesic overuse duration of > or =3 months 0.9% (1.2% for women and 0.6% for men). Chronic headache was more than seven times more likely among those with analgesic overuse (> or =1 month) than those without (odds ratio [OR] = 7.5, 95% CI: 6.6 to 8.5). Upon analysis of the different chronic pain subgroups separately, the association with analgesic overuse was strongest for chronic migraine (OR = 10.3, 95% CI: 8.1 to 13.0), intermediate for chronic nonmigrainous headache (OR = 6.2, 95% CI: 5.3 to 7.2), and weakest for chronic neck (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 2.3 to 2.9) and chronic low-back (OR = 3.0, 95% CI: 2.7 to 3.3) pain. The association became stronger with increasing duration of analgesic use for all groups and was most evident among those with headache, especially those with migraine. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic headache associated with analgesic overuse is prevalent and especially chronic migraine is more strongly associated with frequent intake of analgesics than other common pain conditions like chronic neck and chronic low-back pain.
PubMed ID
15136678 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Divorce and Onset of Drug Abuse in a Swedish National Sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302907
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 05 01; 187(5):1010-1018
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-01-2018
Author
Alexis C Edwards
Sara Larsson Lönn
Jan Sundquist
Kenneth S Kendler
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 05 01; 187(5):1010-1018
Date
05-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Divorce - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Widowhood - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Rates of drug abuse are higher among divorced individuals than among those who are married, but it is not clear whether divorce itself is a risk factor for drug abuse or whether the observed association is confounded by other factors. We examined the association between divorce and onset of drug abuse in a population-based Swedish cohort born during 1965-1975 (n = 651,092) using Cox proportional hazards methods, with marital status as a time-varying covariate. Potential confounders (e.g., demographics, adolescent deviance, and family history of drug abuse) were included as covariates. Parallel analyses were conducted for widowhood and drug-abuse onset. In models with adjustments, divorce was associated with a substantial increase in risk of drug-abuse onset in both sexes (hazard ratios > 5). Co-relative analyses (among biological relatives) were consistent with a partially causal role of divorce on drug-abuse onset. Widowhood also increased risk of drug-abuse onset, although to a lesser extent. Divorce is a potent risk factor for onset of drug abuse, even after adjusting for deviant behavior in adolescence and family history of drug abuse. The somewhat less-pronounced association with widowhood, particularly among men, suggests that the magnitude of association between divorce and drug abuse may not be generalizable to the end of a relationship.
PubMed ID
29155917 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific cardiovascular risk associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs among healthy individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143012
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Jul;3(4):395-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Emil Loldrup Fosbøl
Fredrik Folke
Søren Jacobsen
Jeppe N Rasmussen
Rikke Sørensen
Tina Ken Schramm
Søren S Andersen
Søren Rasmussen
Henrik Enghusen Poulsen
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Gunnar H Gislason
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark. ELF@heart.dk
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Jul;3(4):395-405
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Studies have raised concern on the cardiovascular safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We studied safety of NSAID therapy in a nationwide cohort of healthy individuals.
With the use of individual-level linkage of nationwide administrative registers, we identified a cohort of individuals without hospitalizations 5 years before first prescription claim of NSAIDs and without claimed drug prescriptions for selected concomitant medication 2 years previously. The risk of cardiovascular death, a composite of coronary death or nonfatal myocardial infarction, and fatal or nonfatal stroke associated with the use of NSAIDs was estimated by case-crossover and Cox proportional hazard analyses. The entire Danish population age 10 years or more consisted of 4,614,807 individuals on January 1, 1997, of which 2,663,706 (57.8%) claimed at least 1 prescription for NSAIDs during 1997 to 2005. Of these; 1,028,437 individuals were included in the study after applying selection criteria regarding comorbidity and concomitant pharmacotherapy. Use of the nonselective NSAID diclofenac and the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.62 to 2.42; and odds ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 2.59, respectively), with a dose-dependent increase in risk. There was a trend for increased risk of fatal or nonfatal stroke associated with ibuprofen treatment (odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.63), but naproxen was not associated with increased cardiovascular risk (odds ratio for cardiovascular death, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.42).
Individual NSAIDs have different degrees of cardiovascular safety, which must be considered when choosing appropriate treatment. In particular, rofecoxib and diclofenac were associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and should be used with caution in most individuals, whereas our results suggest that naproxen has a safer cardiovascular risk-profile.
PubMed ID
20530789 View in PubMed
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Childhood stress and symptoms of drug dependence in adolescence and early adulthood: social phobia as a mediator.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203134
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1999 Jan;69(1):61-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
D J DeWit
K. MacDonald
D R Offord
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Addiction Research Foundation Division, London, Ont.
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1999 Jan;69(1):61-72
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Causality
Child
Child Development
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Ontario - epidemiology
Phobic Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Social Behavior
Statistics as Topic
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Retrospective data from 7,871 individuals age 16 to 64 were used to investigate whether, among those diagnosed with lifetime social phobia, its symptoms serve to link life events and chronic strains in childhood with symptoms of drug dependence in adulthood. Findings suggest social phobia as a pathway through which early life events and chronic strains affect the development of drug-related problems. Implications for research and clinical practice are discussed.
PubMed ID
9990437 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical observations of agonist-antagonist analgesic dependence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234438
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1987 Dec;20(4):347-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
J E Peachey
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Institute Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1987 Dec;20(4):347-65
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics, Opioid
Butorphanol
Canada
Humans
Narcotic Antagonists
Pentazocine
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The agonist-antagonist opioids are clinically effective analgesics with generally low abuse potential. Four agonist-antagonists are currently available for use as analgesics. Pentazocine, butorphanol and nalbuphine produce morphine-like effects in low doses and, to varying degrees, dysphoric effects as the dose is increased. Buprenorphine, an antagonist opioid of slow onset but long duration of action, produces morphine agonist effects at lower doses, and as the dose is increased, antagonist effects with minimal or no dysphoria. Clinical experience with pentazocine indicates that abuse is possible and consists of two main types: misuse (and abuse) of the drug alone by patients during treatment for pain and, abuse of the drug, often taken together with other psychoactive agents, as a substitute for the preferred drug of abuse. Few reports of abuse have appeared for butorphanol, nalbuphine and buprenorphine; however, considerable care is recommended in their use in patients, especially where there is the possibility for abuse as might occur in patients who require long-term treatment, with a history of drug abuse, and where the drug is easily obtained.
PubMed ID
2894289 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost of specialized addiction treatment of clients with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113163
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:570
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Svetlana Popova
Shannon Lange
Larry Burd
Karen Urbanoski
Jürgen Rehm
Author Affiliation
Social and Epidemiological Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell St, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada. lana.popova@camh.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:570
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) constitute a special population that may be at particularly high risk for substance use. The purpose of the current study was to estimate the utilization of specialized addiction treatment services (SATS) and the associated cost, as a part of the total cost of health care associated with FASD in Canada.
The current study was a modeling study. Data on SATS by lifetime mental disorder status were obtained from the Drug and Alcohol Treatment Information System (DATIS) in Ontario, Canada for 2010/11. The number of clients with FASD who received SATS in Ontario in 2010/11 was estimated, assuming that approximately 37% (confidence interval: 21.6%-54.5%) of individuals with FASD abuse or are addicted to alcohol and/or drugs and that their utilization rate of SATS is the same as those for people with a lifetime mental disorder. The data from DATIS was then extrapolated to the total Canadian population.
The cost of SATS for clients with FASD in Canada in 2010/11 ranged from $1.65 million Canadian dollars (CND) to $3.59 million CND, based on 5,526 outpatient visits and 9,529 resident days. When the sensitivity analysis was performed the cost of SATS ranged from $979 thousand CND to $5.34 million CND.
Special attention must be paid to at-risk groups of individuals such as those with FASD, in order to reduce the likelihood of the development of co-morbid substance abuse problems, and thus, reducing the overall burden on Canadian society.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23758674 View in PubMed
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[Drug abuse--explosion of Ecstasy in Oslo. Interview by Kari Anne Aase.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11075
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Mar 11;85(5):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1997

42 records – page 1 of 5.