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Harm reduction through housing first: an assessment of the Emergency Warming Centre in Inuvik, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279861
Source
Harm Reduct J. 2017 Feb 07;14(1):8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-07-2017
  1 document  
Author
Michael G Young
Kathleen Manion
Source
Harm Reduct J. 2017 Feb 07;14(1):8
Date
Feb-07-2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
490553
Keywords
Comorbidity
Emergencies
Harm Reduction
Homeless Persons
Housing/statistics & numerical data
Humans
Program Evaluation/methods
Mental Disorders/epidemiology
Social Welfare
Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology
Temperature
Abstract
This research examines the effectiveness of an Emergency Warming Centre (EWC) in Inuvik, Canada, at reducing rates of morbidity and mortality for homeless persons with concurrent disorders (mental health problems and addictions). Inuvik is a small town of approximately 3500 residents, with over 65% being Aboriginal. The town is situated on the Beaufort Delta in the Western Canadian Arctic and is subject to oil and gas extraction-based boom and bust economic cycles. The centre provided food and accommodation for those under the influence of alcohol or drugs who had no other place to stay.
Qualitative interviews about users' experiences at the centre were conducted with guests, as they were called, centre staff and other key stakeholders in autumn 2014 and spring 2015. Samples of (9) respondents and (7) stakeholders provided significant information about the importance of the EWC. The content of the qualitative data with guests and stakeholders were analyzed for emergent themes.
Several emergent themes and subthemes related to participants' experiences at the EWC and success of the centre. Overall, the results showed that guests benefitted from a safe place to stay and felt better about their overall health.
Compared with research on wet shelters in New Zealand, Great Britain and the US, this research reveals that harm reduction-based models for homeless persons with concurrent disorders require significant investments in infrastructure, which are not readily available. Yet, the lessons learned from these jurisdictions might be extrapolated to communities like Inuvik to develop alternative housing strategies.
PubMed ID
28173807 View in PubMed
Documents

12954_2016_Article_128.pdf

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Observations on the prevalence of ear disease in the Inuit and Cree Indian school population of Kuujjuaraapik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1986 Feb; 15(1):25-30.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
J D Baxter
G. Julien
T L Tewfik
H J Ilecki
M B Crago
Author Affiliation
McGill University
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1986 Feb; 15(1):25-30.
Date
1986
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Kuujjuaraapik
Otitis media
Hearing deficiency
Noise
Audiometry
Diet, traditional
Smoking
Alcohol abuse
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Child
Community Health Services
Ear Diseases - epidemiology
Female
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - history
Inuits - history
Male
Quebec
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
In the last twenty years it has been recognized that hearing loss as the result of middle ear infection and/or noise exposure is a major problem among Canadian Inuit. In the past ten years in the Eastern Canadian Arctic attempts have been made to alleviate the problem and physicians, audiologists and educators have been involved in treatment, training programs and research with varying degrees of success. In the last few years the Quebec Inuit have become more aware of these problems and have asked for assistance. Whatever evolves, Inuit co-operation and advice is essential; their cultural identity must be respected if any project is to be successful. In February, 1984, a program outline working paper entitled "Program for Combatting Hearing Disorders in the Inuit Population of Nouveau Quebec" was circulated by Project Nord-Laval University. The goal of the program was "to ensure the integrity of hearing for the Inuit by preventing hearing loss, identifying hearing loss and minimizing the effects of hearing loss." In October, 1984 a Pilot Project involving the school population at Kuujjuaraapik was carried out involving personnel from the Project Nord-Laval University, the Department of Otolaryngology and the School of Human Communication Disorders-McGill University.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2404.
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