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Child guardianship in a Canadian home visitation program for women who use substances in the perinatal period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152868
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009;16(1):e126-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rosanne M T Mills
Jodi E Siever
Matt Hicks
Dorothy Badry
Suzanne C Tough
Karen Benzies
Author Affiliation
Decision Support Research Team, Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009;16(1):e126-39
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child Custody
Child Rearing
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Home Care Services
House Calls
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Maternal health services
Maternal Welfare - psychology
Maternal-Child Health Centers
Mothers - psychology
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Program Evaluation
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
Retaining guardianship of one's infant is often a priority for pregnant women who use substances, and may be beneficial to infants when they are safe in their mothers' care. Previous studies from the United States have identified several maternal psychosocial characteristics associated with the ability to keep an infant free from abuse or neglect; however, little is known about the impact of multiple risk factors on guardianship, particularly in Canadian intervention programs.
To describe maternal characteristics associated with child guardianship among pregnant women at risk of an alcohol and/or substance exposed pregnancy who attended a Canadian home visitation program.
Guardianship status at 6 months post-enrolment was extracted from a provincial program's records for all women enrolled between November 1999 and May 2005 (n=64). Bivariate analyses were performed to determine client characteristics most likely to have retained guardianship.
At follow-up, 70% of participants were guardians of the index infant. Higher income, more prenatal care, no history of sexual abuse, better alcohol and psychiatric scores, and fewer risk factors on a cumulative risk index were significantly associated with retaining guardianship at 6 month follow-up (p
PubMed ID
19182306 View in PubMed
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[Disability insurance--are drug addicts discriminated?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80290
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Oct 5;126(19):2546
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-2006
Author
Haarr Dagfinn
Author Affiliation
Samfunnsmedisinsk enhet, Kristiansand kommune, Kristiansand. dagfinn.haarr@sentrum-legesenter.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Oct 5;126(19):2546
Date
Oct-5-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Insurance, Disability - legislation & jurisprudence
Insurance, Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Prejudice
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
PubMed ID
17028638 View in PubMed
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Norwegian version of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview: feasibility, acceptability and test-retest reliability in an acute psychiatric ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98983
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2010 Apr;25(3):172-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
J. Mordal
O. Gundersen
J G Bramness
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Department, Lovisenberg Deaconal Hospital, N-0440 Oslo, Norway. jon.mordal@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2010 Apr;25(3):172-7
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Comorbidity
Crisis Intervention
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Inservice training
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Reproducibility of Results
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Translating
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility, patient and clinician acceptability and test-retest reliability of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) used by non-psychiatrists in an acute psychiatric ward. METHOD: Of 268 consecutive patients included in a cross-sectional study, 176 (66%) completed MINI, and were compared to patients not interviewed. Patients and clinicians were questioned about the interview, using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). For 38 patients, test-retest reliability was assessed with Cohen's kappa and observed agreement. RESULTS: MINI was not feasible for all patients. Among factors associated with not being interviewed were early discharge, psychosis, substance use and involuntary admissions. Although evaluations by patients and clinicians completing the postinterview questionnaire varied, MINI was generally perceived as being useful and feasible. Psychotic symptoms were associated with a less positive experience with MINI for both patients and clinicians. In the test-retest analyses, kappa values indicated excellent agreement for six diagnoses, fair to good for six and poor for seven, whereas observed agreement was 75% or above for all disorders. CONCLUSION: Among patients admitted to an acute psychiatric ward willing and able to complete the interview, MINI was well accepted by patients and clinicians, and has moderately good test-retest reliability.
PubMed ID
19553089 View in PubMed
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Predictors of involuntary hospitalizations to acute psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116463
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Mar-Apr;36(2):136-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kjetil Hustoft
Tor Ketil Larsen
Bjørn Auestad
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Torleif Ruud
Author Affiliation
Stavanger University Hospital, Division of Psychiatry, Armauer Hansensvei 20, Post Office Box 8100, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway. khu2@sus.no
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Mar-Apr;36(2):136-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Mental Health Centers - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
General Practice - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - legislation & jurisprudence
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - legislation & jurisprudence
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Young Adult
Abstract
There is little knowledge of predictors for involuntary hospitalizations in acute psychiatric units.
The Multi-center study of Acute Psychiatry included all cases of acute consecutive psychiatric admissions in twenty acute psychiatric units in Norway, representing about 75% of the acute psychiatric units during 2005-2006. Data included admission process, rating of Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales.
Fifty-six percent were voluntary and 44% involuntary hospitalized. Regression analysis identified contact with police, referral by physicians who did not know the patient, contact with health services within the last 48 h, not living in own apartment or house, high scores for aggression, level of hallucinations and delusions, and contact with an out-of office clinic within the last 48 h and low GAF symptom score as predictors for involuntary hospitalization. Involuntary patients were older, more often male, non-Norwegian, unmarried and had lower level of education. They more often had disability pension or received social benefits, and were more often admitted during evenings and nights, found to have more frequent substance abuse and less often responsible for children and were less frequently motivated for admission. Involuntary patients had less contact with psychiatric services before admission. Most patients were referred because of a deterioration of their psychiatric illness.
Involuntary hospitalization seems to be guided by the severity of psychiatric symptoms and factors "surrounding" the referred patient. Important factors seem to be male gender, substance abuse, contact with own GP, aggressive behavior, and low level of social functioning and lack of motivation. There was a need for assistance by the police in a significant number of cases. This complicated picture offers some important challenges to the organization of primary and psychiatric health services and a need to consider better pathways to care.
PubMed ID
23395506 View in PubMed
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[Process of change in patients with concurrent substance use - mental health problems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155154
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2007;32(2):59-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Didier Acier
Louise Nadeau
Michel Landry
Author Affiliation
Psychologue-chercheur, Centre Dollard-Cormier, Université de Montréal.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2007;32(2):59-82
Date
2007
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotropic Drugs
Quebec
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Retrospective Studies
Social Adjustment
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
This paper is a retrospective study with a five year follow-up which examines the variations in substance use and the determinants of these variations. This exploratory research studied a sub-sample of 22 participants, selected from an initial sample of 197 patients with concurrent substance use and other mental health disorders. At the quantitative level, the statistical analysis shows an improvement in the problematic use of alcohol and drugs but no change in psychological state, health, family and interpersonals relations, as well as employment. At the qualitative level, the analysis of the participant's subjective view indicates that the two main elements of progression in substance use are the effects and the availability of substances. The main elements of reduction in substance use are the use of services, the personal techniques developed by participants, the family network, physical health, lack of financial resources, "occupational" activities, and a process of maturation.
PubMed ID
18797541 View in PubMed
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A psychometric study of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test-Extended in a Norwegian sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128069
Source
Psychol Rep. 2011 Oct;109(2):663-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Ruben Sletteng
Andreas K Harnang
Ellen Hoxmark
Oddgeir Friborg
Per M Aslaksen
Rolf Wynn
Author Affiliation
Divison of Addiction and Specialized Psychiatric Services, University Hospital of Northern Norway.
Source
Psychol Rep. 2011 Oct;109(2):663-74
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Young Adult
Abstract
Motivation is a widely used concept in substance use treatment, and is commonly seen as a premise for change during treatment. Different measures of motivation have been suggested. A relatively new instrument is the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test-Extended (DUDIT-E), developed in Sweden. This instrument has recently been introduced in Norway. The present study examined the Motivational Index of the Norwegian version of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test-Extended (DUDIT-E). We tested whether the three-factor model ("Positive aspects of substance abuse"; "Negative aspects of substance abuse"; and "Treatment readiness") suggested by previous studies could be replicated in a sample of Norwegian inpatients. Responses to the DUDIT-E were obtained from 105 patients admitted to inpatient substance abuse treatment in Northern Norway. Exploratory common factor analyses were used to compare the factor structure from the current sample with the Swedish sample of mainly detoxification patients and prison inmates. The current sample did not include prison inmates, and it consisted of more women than the Swedish sample. The samples did not differ according to age or substance dependency. The analyses suggested that six primary factors was the most efficient way of combining the item scores, and not 11 as in the Swedish sample. A second-order factor analysis found best support for a two-factor solution, and hence, did not replicate the previously suggested three-factor model either. Several regression analyses comparing the efficiency of the different ways of combining the DUDIT scores in primary or secondary factor scores indicated that the model involving six sum scores had best merit and should be explored further.
PubMed ID
22238864 View in PubMed
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The self-report Drug Use Disorders Identification Test: Extended (DUDIT-E): reliability, validity, and motivational index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77808
Source
J Subst Abuse Treat. 2007 Jun;32(4):357-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Berman Anne H
Palmstierna Tom
Källmén Håkan
Bergman Hans
Author Affiliation
Division of Forensic Psychiatry, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anne.h.berman@ki.se
Source
J Subst Abuse Treat. 2007 Jun;32(4):357-69
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Prisoners - psychology
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Sweden
Abstract
Among clients who have been screened already for drug-related problems, the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test--Extended (DUDIT-E) maps the frequency of illicit drug use (D), the positive (P) and negative (N) aspects of drug use, and treatment readiness (T). D scores correlated with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition diagnoses among 154 heavy drug users from criminal justice and drug detoxification settings, as well as with urine test results in drug detoxification units. One-week test/retest intraclass correlation coefficients among 92 male prison inmates were .90, .78, .75, and .84 for D, P, N, and T scores, respectively. Cronbach's alpha were .88-.95 for P score, .88-.93 for N score, and .72-.81 for T score. Principal components analysis supported construct validity for P, N, and T scores. T scores were higher in prison treatment units than in motivational and regular units without treatment emphasis. Motivational index scores differentiated between three categories of heavy drug users; they did not differentiate between prisons and unit types, but this corresponded to unclear structural differentiation between units.
PubMed ID
17481459 View in PubMed
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[Specialized maternal health service for drug-abuser parents-to-be: long-term support prevents recurrence and creates a better environment for the growing child]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32749
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 May 3;97(18):2201-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-3-2000

Three-year outcome of treatment in an early psychosis program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148576
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;54(9):626-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Jean Addington
Donald Addington
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Alberta Centennial Mental Health Research Chair, Calgary, Alberta. jmadding@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;54(9):626-30
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Case Management
Combined Modality Therapy
Community Mental Health Services
Comorbidity
Comprehensive Health Care
Continuity of Patient Care
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Early Diagnosis
Family Practice
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Referral and Consultation
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Adjustment
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies defining the course and outcome of people experiencing their first episode psychosis (FEP) generally report an improvement in symptoms and functioning. Little is known about the follow-up arrangements offered to patients when their time in a FEP comes to an end.
Our study focuses on a sample of FEP patients (n = 292) who were followed for up to 3 years in a multi-element specialized FEP service.
Improvement in positive symptoms and social functioning, but not negative symptoms, was observed in this sample both for people who completed 3 years in the program and for those who left early. About 40% were referred to specialized mental health services, whereas 24% were followed by their family physician. Patients who were followed by family physicians had decreased symptoms and improved functioning.
Most patients treated in an early psychosis program will need follow-up, the largest group will require specialized mental health services in the community, but a significant group can be followed by family physicians.
PubMed ID
19751551 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.