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Alcohol and substance abuse, depression and suicide attempts after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281902
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
O. Backman
D. Stockeld
F. Rasmussen
E. Näslund
R. Marsk
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Small studies suggest that subjects who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of suicide, alcohol and substance use disorders. This population-based cohort study aimed to assess the incidence of treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and attempted suicide after primary Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
All patients who underwent primary RYGB in Sweden between 2001 and 2010 were included. Incidence of hospital admission for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and suicide attempt was measured, along with the number of drugs prescribed. This cohort was compared with a large age-matched, non-obese reference cohort based on the Swedish population. Inpatient care and prescribed drugs registers were used.
Before RYGB surgery, women, but not men, were at higher risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use disorder compared with the reference cohort. After surgery, this was the case for both sexes. The risk of being diagnosed and treated for depression remained raised after surgery. Suicide attempts were significantly increased after RYGB. The adjusted hazard ratio for attempted suicide in the RYGB cohort after surgery compared with the general non-obese population was 2·85 (95 per cent c.i. 2·40 to 3·39).
Patients who have undergone RYGB are at an increased risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use, with an increased rate of attempted suicide compared with a non-obese general population cohort.
PubMed ID
27467694 View in PubMed
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[The current status of the drug abuse problem in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209845
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1997;97(9):4-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
N N Ivanets
I P Anokhina
N V Strelets
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1997;97(9):4-10
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Humans
Incidence
Morbidity - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Abstract
The statistic data evidence for rapid increase of the number of narcomanias, especially in juveniles and young people nowadays in Russia. The spectrum of psychoactive preparations used became also wider. On the basis of medico-biological studies the conception concerning main pathogenetic mechanisms of the development of psychoactive substances dependence was formulated. Enzyme immuno assays either for diagnosis of long-term opiate administration or for determination of blood serum methadone level were elaborated. Clinical studies demonstrated pathomorphism of the symptoms of dependence upon well-known narcotics. Clinical pattern of dependence upon new psychoactive preparations which cause dependence syndrome was also investigated. New differentiated methods of treatment of various types of narcomanias are proposed. There is underlined that a comprehensive program of narcomanias prophylaxis in Russia is needed.
PubMed ID
9410600 View in PubMed
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Within-family environmental transmission of drug abuse: a Swedish national study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118225
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;70(2):235-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Kenneth S Kendler
Henrik Ohlsson
Kristina Sundquist
Jan Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23219, USA. kendler@vcu.edu
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;70(2):235-42
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Family Relations
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Models, Psychological
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Siblings - psychology
Social Environment
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
CONTEXT Drug abuse (DA) strongly runs in families. Does this result solely from genetic factors or does the family environment contribute? OBJECTIVE To determine the familial environmental contribution to the risk for DA. DESIGN Follow-up in 9 public databases (1961-2009) in siblings and spouses. SETTING Sweden. PARTICIPANTS A total of 137?199 sibling pairs and 7561 spousal pairs containing a proband with DA and matched control probands. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Drug abuse recorded in medical, legal, or pharmacy registry records. RESULTS In the best-fit model, which contained significant linear, quadratic, and cubic effects, among full sibling pairs containing a proband with DA, the relative risk for DA in the sibling declined from more than 6.0 for siblings born within 2 years of each other to less than 4.5 when born 10 years apart. Controlling for age differences in full sibling pairs, the hazard rate for DA in a sibling when the affected proband was older vs younger was 1.42 (95% CI, 1.31-1.54). In the best-fit model, which contained significant linear, quadratic, and cubic effects, among spousal pairs containing a proband with DA, the relative risk for DA in the spouse declined from more than 25.0 within 1 year of proband DA registration to 6.0 after 5 years. CONCLUSIONS Controlling for genetic effects by examining only full siblings, sibling resemblance for the risk for DA was significantly greater in pairs closer vs more distant in age. Older siblings more strongly transmitted the risk for DA to their younger siblings than vice versa. After one spouse is registered for DA, the other spouse has a large short-lived increase in DA risk. These results support strong familial environmental influences on DA at various life stages. A complete understanding of the familial transmission of DA will require knowledge of how genetic and familial environmental risk factors act and interact over development.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23229904 View in PubMed
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