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Alcohol withdrawal at home. Pilot project for frail elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212064
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 May;42:937-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
D J Evans
S D Street
D J Lynch
Author Affiliation
Victoria Innovative Seniors Treatment Agency (VISTA), BC.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 May;42:937-45
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Alcoholism - prevention & control
British Columbia
Case Management - organization & administration
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Social Support
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control
Abstract
The need for safe, accessible, client-centred, alcohol withdrawal services for seniors was recognized by health service workers in Victoria. A partnership of health and support service organizations developed and implemented a pilot project for treating alcohol withdrawal in the home. The project provided service that integrated well with a substance-abuse treatment program for seniors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8688696 View in PubMed
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Buprenorphine misuse among heroin and amphetamine users in Malmo, Sweden: purpose of misuse and route of administration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84852
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2007;13(4):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Hakansson A.
Medvedeo A.
Andersson M.
Berglund M.
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Alcohol Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. anders_c.hakansson@med.lu.se
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2007;13(4):207-15
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Administration, Sublingual
Adult
Amphetamine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Buprenorphine - administration & dosage
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Euphoria - drug effects
Female
Health Surveys
Heroin Dependence - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Motivation
Needle-Exchange Programs - statistics & numerical data
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Street Drugs
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Buprenorphine misuse by injecting drug users was assessed in a survey of 350 needle exchangers, either amphetamine (57%) or heroin users (42%). 89% of heroin users and 24% of amphetamine users reported using buprenorphine at some time during the previous year. Most users reported illicit acquisition. Among illicit users, 87% of heroin users reported intake for withdrawal treatment or self-detoxification, and 11% for euphoria. Euphoria seeking was more common among amphetamine users (62%, p
PubMed ID
17851242 View in PubMed
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A double-blind randomized trial of nicotine nasal spray as an aid in smoking cessation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67619
Source
Eur Respir J. 1997 Jul;10(7):1585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
T. Blöndal
M. Franzon
A. Westin
Author Affiliation
Reykjavik Health Care Center, National University Hospital, Iceland.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1997 Jul;10(7):1585-90
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intranasal
Adult
Aerosols
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Nicotine - administration & dosage
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective of the study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of nicotine nasal solution (NNS) for smoking cessation from the stopping day up to 3 months. We also followed the participants for 2 yrs after ceasing smoking to assess what happens after stopping using NNS. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, 2 yr prospective study, 157 smokers were given either NNS, one dose containing 1 mg of nicotine per 100 microL (n=79), or placebo (n=78). Treatment was continued for up to 1 yr. One day after quitting smoking, the average number of daily doses was 11 in the group assigned NNS and 14 in the group assigned the placebo, and after 6 weeks, 14 and 6 doses, respectively, among abstinent participants still using spray. After 3 months, 65% of the abstainers in the nicotine group were still using the NNS. The abstinence rates were 51, 39 and 29% after 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, respectively, as compared to 24, 19 and 18% in the placebo group (p=0.0003; p=0.003; p=0.050). The proportion abstinent at the 1 yr (25 vs 17%) and 2 yr follow-ups (19 vs 14%) was higher among those assigned to the nicotine than to the placebo group, but not significantly so for the numbers used in the study. In conclusion, the use of nicotine nasal spray significantly increased the abstinence rate during the first 6 months following the quitting day.
PubMed ID
9230252 View in PubMed
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Drinking alcohol surrogates among clients of an alcohol-misuser treatment clinic in Novosibirsk, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146777
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(13):1821-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Natalia Bobrova
Robert West
Darya Malutina
Evgenia Koshkina
Ravil Terkulov
Martin Bobak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. n.bobrova@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(13):1821-32
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data
Alcoholism - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control
Abstract
A pilot study was conducted in the Russian city Novosibirsk during 2006-2007 with 40 participants sampled from clients admitted to health services for drinking-related problems to explore surrogates for alcoholic beverage drinking using semistructured interviews. Types of surrogates consumed and reasons for their consumption were investigated. Results revealed that the most prevalent reported surrogate used was industrial spirit. The main reasons for drinking surrogates were the high affordability and physical availability of surrogates combined with the need to relieve severe withdrawal symptoms. The study limitations are described, and suggestions for future research are made.
Notes
Cites: Addiction. 2007 Apr;102(4):544-5317362291
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Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007 Oct;31(10):1613-2417681034
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Cites: Addiction. 2005 Feb;100(2):146-915679743
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Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 1999 Nov-Dec;34(6):824-910659717
PubMed ID
20001282 View in PubMed
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Litonit: evaluation of clinical effectiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11730
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1993 May;28(3):333-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
V I Kresyn
V L Aryaev
F I Kostev
Author Affiliation
Chair of General and Clinical Pharmacology, N.I. Pirogov Medical Institute, Odessa, Ukraine.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1993 May;28(3):333-7
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - rehabilitation
Double-Blind Method
Humans
Kidney - drug effects
Lithium - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Nicotinic Acids - adverse effects - chemistry - therapeutic use
Placebos
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control
Abstract
Clinical data are presented on a new anti-alcoholic drug, litonit. A substantial reduction in the pathological addiction to alcohol takes place under the effect of litonit, and a stable aversive reaction to alcohol develops. The new drug is distinguished by its low toxicity, good tolerance, and its failure to cause disorders of the liver and kidneys even after chronic administration.
PubMed ID
8352844 View in PubMed
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The prescription of transdermal nicotine patches for tobacco-using dental patients: current status in Indiana.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222835
Source
J Indiana Dent Assoc. 1992 Nov-Dec;71(6):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A G Christen
J A Christen
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, IUSD.
Source
J Indiana Dent Assoc. 1992 Nov-Dec;71(6):12-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Canada
Delayed-Action Preparations
Dentist-Patient Relations
Humans
Indiana
Nicotine - administration & dosage
Smoking Cessation
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control
United States
Abstract
As Indiana dentists become involved in office-based smoking cessation efforts, they can prescribe the recently-developed Federal Drug Administration (FDA)-approved nicotine transdermal patch delivery systems for their smoking patients who wish to overcome nicotine addiction. This article reviews the evolutionary and scientific development of transdermal nicotine patch systems within an oral health setting. It discusses dental office-based cessation programs which have been designed by faculty members at the Indiana University School of Dentistry and by dentists who work with the National Cancer Institute. Finally, it presents the rationale for patch usage and specific techniques which are utilized in prescribing and monitoring this medication.
PubMed ID
1341696 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.