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A 5-year follow-up study of adolescents who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107628
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Sheilagh Hodgins
Sara Lövenhag
Mattias Rehn
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Maria-Ungdom Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that substance misuse in adolescence is associated with increased risks of hospitalizations for mental and physical disorders, convictions for crimes, poverty, and premature death from age 21 to 50. The present study examined 180 adolescent boys and girls who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden. The adolescents and their parents were assessed independently when the adolescents first contacted the clinic to diagnose mental disorders and collect information on maltreatment and antisocial behavior. Official criminal files were obtained. Five years later, 147 of the ex-clients again completed similar assessments. The objectives were (1) to document the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD) and drug use disorders (DUD) in early adulthood; and (2) to identify family and individual factors measured in adolescence that predicted these disorders, after taking account of AUD and DUD in adolescence and treatment. Results showed that AUD, DUD, and AUD + DUD present in mid-adolescence were in most cases also present in early adulthood. Prediction models detected no positive effect of treatment in limiting persistence of these disorders. Thus, treatment-as-usual provided by the only psychiatric service for adolescents with substance misuse in a large urban center in Sweden failed to prevent the persistence of substance misuse. Despite extensive clinical assessments of the ex-clients and their parents, few factors assessed in mid-adolescence were associated with substance misuse disorders 5 years later. It may be that family and individual factors in early life promote the mental disorders that precede adolescent substance misuse.
PubMed ID
23989597 View in PubMed
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[A catalog of institutions for drug abuse treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11397
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 May 30;115(14):1776
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-1995
Author
M. Blindheim
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 May 30;115(14):1776
Date
May-30-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catalogs
Humans
Norway
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
PubMed ID
7785039 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of moderate drinking by alcoholism treatment services in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211210
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1996 Sep;57(5):559-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
H. Rosenberg
E G Devine
N. Rothrock
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, Bowling Green State University, Ohio 43403, USA.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1996 Sep;57(5):559-62
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Ambulatory Care
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Goals
Humans
Patient Admission
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Temperance - psychology
Abstract
The present study was conducted to provide a nationwide survey of acceptance of nonabstinence goals and related alcoholism treatment practices by Canadian alcoholism treatment services.
A random sample of 335 Canadian alcoholism treatment service agencies were mailed a 4-page questionnaire designed to assess acceptance of moderate drinking as a drinking goal and related alcoholism treatment practices.
Acceptance varied by type of service, with considerably more acceptance by outpatient programs (62%) and mixed inpatient/outpatient programs (43%) than inpatient/detoxification/ correctional facilities (27%) and halfway houses (16%). Two-thirds of the respondents who reported moderate drinking as unacceptable in their own agencies categorically rejected moderation for all alcoholism clients.
Individuals seeking services in Canadian alcoholism treatment agencies are more likely to have a choice of drinking goals if they present to an outpatient program than a residential institution, and Canadian agencies appear more accepting of moderation goals than American programs, but less accepting than British and Norwegian service agencies.
PubMed ID
8858554 View in PubMed
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Access to health and social services for IDU: the impact of a medically supervised injection facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149722
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):341-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Will Small
Natasha Van Borek
Nadia Fairbairn
Evan Wood
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):341-6
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Data Collection
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs - organization & administration
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Injection drug users (IDU) often experience barriers to conventional health-care services, and consequently might rely on acute and emergency services. This study sought to investigate IDU perspectives regarding the impact of supervised injection facility (SIF) use on access to health-care services.
Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 50 Vancouver-based IDU participating in the Scientific Evaluation of Supervised Injecting cohort. Audio-recorded interviews elicited IDU perspectives regarding the impact of SIF use on access to health and social services. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted.
Fifty IDU, including 21 women, participated in this study. IDU narratives indicate that the SIF serves to facilitate access to health care by providing much-needed care on-site and connects IDU to external services through referrals. Participants' perspectives suggest that the SIF has facilitated increased uptake of health and social services among IDU.
Although challenges related to access to care remain in many settings, SIF have potential to promote health by facilitating enhanced access to health-care and social services through a model of care that is accessible to high-risk IDU.
PubMed ID
19594786 View in PubMed
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Accounting for individual differences and timing of events: estimating the effect of treatment on criminal convictions in heroin users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261868
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jo Røislien
Thomas Clausen
Jon Michael Gran
Anne Bukten
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:68
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Crime - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Criminals - legislation & jurisprudence
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Heroin Dependence - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The reduction of crime is an important outcome of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). Criminal intensity and treatment regimes vary among OMT patients, but this is rarely adjusted for in statistical analyses, which tend to focus on cohort incidence rates and rate ratios. The purpose of this work was to estimate the relationship between treatment and criminal convictions among OMT patients, adjusting for individual covariate information and timing of events, fitting time-to-event regression models of increasing complexity.
National criminal records were cross linked with treatment data on 3221 patients starting OMT in Norway 1997-2003. In addition to calculating cohort incidence rates, criminal convictions was modelled as a recurrent event dependent variable, and treatment a time-dependent covariate, in Cox proportional hazards, Aalen's additive hazards, and semi-parametric additive hazards regression models. Both fixed and dynamic covariates were included.
During OMT, the number of days with criminal convictions for the cohort as a whole was 61% lower than when not in treatment. OMT was associated with reduced number of days with criminal convictions in all time-to-event regression models, but the hazard ratio (95% CI) was strongly attenuated when adjusting for covariates; from 0.40 (0.35, 0.45) in a univariate model to 0.79 (0.72, 0.87) in a fully adjusted model. The hazard was lower for females and decreasing with older age, while increasing with high numbers of criminal convictions prior to application to OMT (all p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24886472 View in PubMed
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[A-clinics and treatment of drug addicts]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10817
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 30;118(20):3175
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1998

[A comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation program for drug addicts at the Dnepropetrovsk Province Drug Abuse Clinic]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11485
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jan-Feb;(1-2):159-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Sauta
S V Rokutov
V A Lavrenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jan-Feb;(1-2):159-62
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Combined Modality Therapy
English Abstract
Humans
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Ukraine
Abstract
On the basis of the experience gained in the treatment of patients who are drug addicts a complex treatment-and-rehabilitation programme has been developed and adopted. It is a psychotherapeutically--oriented programme that includes the following steps: selection of patients, promotion of health of the family, staging, participation of social workers--former patients. The end objective is to achieve a lasting remission in addicted patients, promotion of health of their relatives and normalization of family relations. Such an approach to solving the problem differs from nonmedicamentous methods widely employed now in the Ukraine and UIS republics, which have not been associated with demonstrable effects in treatment and, more important, rehabilitation of addicted persons.
PubMed ID
7483531 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture for substance abuse treatment in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174951
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2):285-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Patricia A Janssen
Louise C Demorest
Elizabeth M Whynot
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V62-1Y6. pjanssen@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2):285-95
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - utilization
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Charities
Community Health Services - utilization
Humans
Middle Aged
Poverty Areas
Questionnaires
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control - therapy
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Urban health
Urban Health Services - utilization
Abstract
In British Columbia, Canada, the City of Vancouver's notorious Downtown Eastside (DES) represents the poorest urban population in Canada. A prevalence rate of 30% for HIV and 90% for hepatitis C makes this a priority area for public-health interventions aimed at reducing the use of injected drugs. This study examined the utility of acupuncture treatment in reducing substance use in the marginalized, transient population. Acupuncture was offered on a voluntary, drop-in basis 5 days per week at two community agencies. During a 3-month period, the program generated 2,755 client visits. A reduction in overall use of substances (P=.01) was reported by subjects in addition to a decrease in intensity of withdrawal symptoms including "shakes," stomach cramps, hallucinations, "muddle-headedness," insomnia, muscle aches, nausea, sweating, heart palpitations, and feeling suicidal, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
15872191 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture treatment for women with concurrent substance use and anxiety/depression: an effective alternative therapy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164364
Source
Fam Community Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;30(2):112-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christine M A Courbasson
Alicia Araujo de Sorkin
Berit Dullerud
Lucy Van Wyk
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Christine_Courbasson@camh.net
Source
Fam Community Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;30(2):112-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture, Ear
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - psychology - therapy
Anxiety Disorders - complications - prevention & control
Depressive Disorder - complications - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Personality Inventory
Self Efficacy
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This exploratory study evaluated the benefits of adding auricular acupuncture to a 21-day outpatient structured psychoeducational treatment program for women with concurrent substance use problems, anxiety, and depression. Women receiving acupuncture (n = 185) reported having reduced physiological cravings for substances, felt significantly less depressed, less anxious, and were better able to reflect on and resolve difficulties than women in the control group (n = 101). It was found that auricular acupuncture, as an adjunct therapy to a comprehensive psychoeducational treatment program for women with addictions, shows promise in being an effective, more viable treatment alternative to anxiolytics.
PubMed ID
19241647 View in PubMed
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Addiction medicine in Canada: challenges and prospects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134877
Source
Subst Abus. 2011 Apr;32(2):93-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Nady el-Guebaly
David Crockford
Sharon Cirone
Meldon Kahan
Author Affiliation
Addiction Division, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. nady.el-guebaly@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Subst Abus. 2011 Apr;32(2):93-100
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification - methods - standards
Clinical Competence - standards
Clinical Medicine
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Humans
Physicians, Family - education
Psychiatry - education
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - manpower
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
In Canada, the qualification of physicians is the jurisdiction of the College of Family Physicians and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Colleges have promoted the training of "generalists" in family medicine and "sophisticated generalists" among the traditional specialties, and the development of subspecialties has not been encouraged. Nevertheless, due to the increasing number of family physicians and specialists practicing a range of new subspecialties, including addiction medicine, the College of Family Physicians has recognized special interest or focused practices, whereas the Royal College has recognized, in psychiatry, 3 subspecialties (child, geriatric, forensic) requiring an extra year of training and may offer others a diploma recognition. These new opportunities will shape the training requirements of addiction medicine leading to available certification through the International and American Medical Societies of Addiction Medicine.
PubMed ID
21534130 View in PubMed
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285 records – page 1 of 29.