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Aboriginal / subsistence whaling (with special reference to the Alaska and Greenland fisheries).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295212
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1982
.................................................. 35 Contributed papers Kapel, F. O. and Petersen, R. - Subsistence Hunting: the Greenland Case. . ...................................... 51 Laughlin, W. S. and Harper, A. B. - Demographic Diversity, Length of Life and Aleut-Eskimo Whaling. ..... 75 Postscript Donovan, G. P. - The International
  1 document  
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3179731
Keywords
Bowhead whales
Aleuts
Eskimos
Inuits
Subsistence hunting
Whaling
Nutritional Requirements
Acculturation
Documents

RS464_SI04-AboriginalSub-1982.pdf

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Canadian Inuit use of caribou and Swedish Sami use of reindeer in entrepreneurship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297035
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
Subsistence Hunting versus Sámi Herding ................................. 315 11.4.1 Canadian Inuit Subsistence Hunting .......................................... 315 11.4.2 Swedish Sámi Herding of Reindeer ........................................... 318 11.5 Processing, Products and Market Connection
  1 document  
Author
Mason, Aldene Helen Meis
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
8230174
Keywords
Reindeer herding
Entrepreneurship
Economic development
Inuit
Sami
Subsistence hunting
Documents

MeisMason_thesis_fulltext.pdf

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Literature review of Eskimo knowledge of the sea ice environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298794
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-7. 57 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1966
  1 document  
Author
Nelson, Richard K.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-7. 57 p.
Date
May 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4787620
Keywords
Alaska
Eskimo
Sea ice
Travel
Survival
Subsistence hunting
Abstract
This report concerns travel and survival on Arctic sea ice. Information is totally derived from literature and deals mainly with Alaskan Eskimo practices but includes some from areas of the Canadian Arctic. Much of the information is anecdotal and unsystematic observation made by pioneers and explorers familiar with the Arctic and the Eskimo. The report lists environmental phenomena or "stimuli" which are likely to occur in the Arctic, and the activities or "responses" which the sea ice traveler must make in order to cope with these external forces or to utilize resources which the environment provides. The author has segregated a series of external forces and resources, and has suggested one or several ways to deal with them. These are divided into the physical environment and biological environment. The first includes temperature, wind, precipitation, atmospheric phenomena, astronomical phenomena, and the sea ice itself. The second includes all sources of energy available to the sea ice hunter: invertebrates, fish, birds and mammals.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.65-7
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Radionuclide contaminant burdens in Arctic marine mammals harvested during subsistence hunting

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102079
Source
Arctic. 2000 Jun;53(2):174-182
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
  1 website  
Author
Cooper, LW
Larsen, IL
O'Hara, TM
Dolvin, S
Woshner, V
Cota, GF
Author Affiliation
Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A.
Department of Wildlife Management, North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska, U.S.A.
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S.A.
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, U.S.A.
Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, U.S.A.
Source
Arctic. 2000 Jun;53(2):174-182
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
108mAg
137Cs
Alaska
Canada
Contamination
Marine mammals
North Slope Borough
Radioactivity
Radionuclides
Resolute region
Subsistence hunting
Abstract
We conducted gamma spectrometric analyses on more than 200 arctic marine mammal tissue samples. These samples were primarily provided by subsistence hunters from northern Alaska, with a smaller number of samples from the Resolute region in Canada. The majority of samples (>90%) had detectable levels of the anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs, with a mean level observed in all samples of 0.67 Bq kg-1 dry weight ± 0.81 (SD). Converted to wet weight, the mean was 0.21 Bq kg-1 ± 0.19 SD. The median activity observed was 0.45 Bq kg-1 dry weight (0.18 Bq kg-1 wet weight) with a range from detection limits to 6.7 Bq kg-1 dry weight (1.1 Bq kg-1 wet weight). These findings confirm expectations that current anthropogenic gamma emitter burdens in marine mammals used in the North American Arctic as subsistence food resources are well below activities that would normally merit public health concern (~1000 Bq kg-1 wet weight). Some differences among species and tissues were observed. Beluga tissues had slightly higher mean burdens of 137Cs overall, and epidermis and muscle tissues in bowhead and beluga whales typically had higher burdens than other tissues analyzed. Low levels of the neutron activation product 108mAg (half-life 418 yr.), probably bioaccumulated from bomb fallout sources, were observed in 16 of 17 beluga livers analyzed, but were not found in any other tissues of beluga or in any other species sampled. A subset of 39 samples of various tissues was analyzed for the alpha and beta emitters 239,240Pu and 90Sr. Plutonium levels were near the threshold of detectability (~0.1 Bq kg-1 dry weight) in 6 of the 39 samples; all other samples had no detectable plutonium. A detectable level of 90Sr (10.3 ± 1.0 Bq kg-1 dry weight) was observed in only one of the 39 samples analyzed, a bowhead epidermis sample. Although the accumulation of 108mAg has not been previously reported in any marine mammal livers, all of our analytical measurements indicate that only very low levels of anthropogenic radioactivity are associated with marine mammals harvested and consumed in the North American Arctic.
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