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5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
toxicology to fish consumption guidelines for methyl mercury in a subsistence species in western Alaska Joe Sarcone has worked with Alaska Native, American Indian, and Pacific Island people on environmental public health issues for more than twenty years. In twenty-four years of service with the
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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Aboriginal / subsistence whaling (with special reference to the Alaska and Greenland fisheries).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295212
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1982
International Whaling Commission Aboriginal/Subsistence Whaling (with special reference to the Alaska and Greenland fisheries) Reports of the International Whaling Commission Special Issue 4 Cambridge 1982 Preface This volume contains the Reports and some papers from the Panel Meeting
  1 document  
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3179731
Keywords
Bowhead whales
Aleuts
Eskimos
Inuits
Subsistence hunting
Whaling
Nutritional Requirements
Acculturation
Documents

RS464_SI04-AboriginalSub-1982.pdf

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Adaptation and sustainability in a small Arctic community: Results of an agent-based simulation model

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76415
Source
Arctic. 2004 Dec;57(4):401-414
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
  1 website  
Author
Berman, M
Nicolson, C
Kofinas, G
Tetlichi, J
Martin, S.
Source
Arctic. 2004 Dec;57(4):401-414
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic indigenous peoples
Subsistence communities
Old Crow, Yukon, Canada
Abstract
Climate warming and resource development could alter key Arctic ecosystem functions that support fish and wildlife resources harvested by local indigenous communities. A different set of global forces - government policies and tourism markets - increasingly directs local cash economies that communities use to support subsistence activities. Agent-based computational models (ABMs) contribute to an integrated assessment of community sustainability by simulating how people interact with each other and adapt to changing economic and environmental conditions. Relying on research and local knowledge to provide rules and parameters for individual and collective decision making, our ABM generates hypothetical social histories as adaptations to scenario-driven changes in environmental and economic conditions. The model generates projections for wage employment, cash income, subsistence harvests, and demographic change over four decades based on a set of user-defined scenarios for climate change, subsistence resources, development, and government spending. Model outcomes assess how scenarios associated with economic and climate change might affect the local economy, resource harvests, and the well-being of residents for the Western Arctic Canadian community of Old Crow, Yukon. The economic and demographic outcomes suggest implications for less quantifiable social and cultural changes. The model can serve as a discussion tool for a fuller exploration of community sustainability and adaptation issues.
Notes
Consortium Library holds this periodical. Entire December issue focused on Arctic human dimensions research.
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Adapting to Environmental and Social Change: Subsistence in Three Aleutian Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294080
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 17 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
1 Adapting to Environmental and Social Change: Subsistence in Three Aleutian Communities By Jennifer Schmidt, Institute of Social and Economic Research1, UAA • Meredith Marchioni, Coastal Connections • Matthew Berman, Institute of Social and Economic Research, UAA. 1 Author contact
  1 document  
Author
Schmidt J
Marchioni M
Berman M
Source
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 17 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1155017
Keywords
Alaska
Atka
Akutan
Nikolski
Subsistence
Environmental change
Abstract
Our surroundings and society are both constantly evolving. Some changes are due to natural processes. People are responsible for other changes, because of what we do—for example, increasing the size of the population, expanding technology, and increasing mobility and connectivity. And some changes—like climate change—are due to a combination of natural processes and actions of people. In the Arctic, including the Aleutian Islands, marine and coastal ecosystems have seen the largest number of regime shifts with direct and indirect consequences for subsistence activities, commercial fisheries, and coastal communities (Council 2016). This paper describes current subsistence activities and changes local residents have observed over time in three Aleutian Island communities—Akutan, Nikolski, and Atka. As described more later, we did initial household surveys in 2016 and a second round in 2017, as well as more detailed interviews with some residents.
Documents

2018_04-AdaptingToEnviroSocialChange.pdf

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Alaska's great thirst: Water, energy, and health in Iñupiaq communities of the Northwest Arctic Borough

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256678
Source
Page 47 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
subsistence practices to health and household economy. This paper demonstrates the links between the cost of energy and water insecurity within this arctic environment. I combine the theoretical frameworks of political ecology and critical medical anthropology with the participatory methods of photovoice
  1 document  
Author
Eichelberger L
Author Affiliation
University of Arizona
Source
Page 47 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Water
Energy
Health
Inupiaq
Economy
Communities
Subsistence
Arctic
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 1. Public Health Perspectives.
Documents
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Source
Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Winter 2002), pp. 30-40.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
know that Alaska’s Arctic cuisine is disappearing. But then, few people know it exists. That we know so little about Eskimo1 food preparation is not surprising—subsistence diets are rarely explored, apart from listing specific foodstuffs and their dietary statistics. Cooking methods are usually of no
  1 document  
Author
Spray, Zona
Source
Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Winter 2002), pp. 30-40.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
407624
Keywords
Alaska
Traditional diet
Eskimo
Subsistence
Documents

alaska-s-vanishing-arctic-cuisine.pdf

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Analysis of a "Mixed Economy" in an Alaskan Native settlement: the case of Arctic Village.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297103
Source
The Canadian Journal of Native Studies XXIII, 1(2003):135-164.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
, data collected in the village in 1999 provide cogent evidence that the priorities and values of the community remain centered upon the hunt and other subsistence activities. Cash income generated through wage labor or transfer payments is merely an additional means to per- petuate this activity. Thus
  1 document  
Author
Dinero, Steven C.
Author Affiliation
School of General Studies, Philadelphia University, Pennsylvania USA
Source
The Canadian Journal of Native Studies XXIII, 1(2003):135-164.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1733850
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Village
Hunting
Subsistence
Economy
Abstract
In this paper, I analyze the mixed economy of the Nets'aii Gwich'in settlement of Arctic Village, Alaska. The economic structures of the Gwich'in began to undergo considerable change following Contact by Europeans in the 19th century. Today the Gwich'in possess several modern amenities, and are linked to the global capitalist economy.
Still, data collected in the village in 1999 provide cogent evidence that the priorities and values of the community remain centered upon the hunt and other subsistence activities. Cash income generated through wage labor or transfer payments is merely an additional means to perpetuate this activity. Thus, any assumptions that the Gwich'in are on the verge of abandoning this socioeconomic system for an urban-centric, wage labor-based system are at best, premature.
Documents

cjnsv23no1_pg135-164.pdf

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Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 28 p.
Publication Type
Report
some of the key areas of activity and accomplishments of ICC (Canada) over the fiscal year 2005-2006. Sustainable harvest and wildlife issues continue to be an important part of ICC (Canada)’s efforts. Supporting the hunting, fishing, co-management and subsistence activities of Inuit is evident
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 28 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2439704
Keywords
Inuit
Chukotka
Alaska
Wildlife management
Subsistence
Abstract
Sustainable harvest and wildlife issues continue to be an important part of ICC (Canada)’s efforts. Supporting the hunting, fishing, co-management and subsistence activities of Inuit is evident in virtually all activities of ICC. ICC (Canada) has continued to speak against the animal rights’ lobby and attempts to halt seal harvesting in eastern Canada and has delivered numerous addresses around the world in support of our positions. ICC (Canada) works with IUCN, the World Conservation Union, on animal rights matters and has been active in the International Whaling Commission. Further, ICC (Canada) is an observer in the North American Marine Mammal Commission.
Over the past year, ICC (Canada) had dialogue with the World Wide Fund for Nature (Arctic Programme) and undertook dialogue with various European states including the United Kingdom, Germany and France whose citizens sometime sympathize with animal welfare organizations on these matters. Our Russian project also provided for a strong co-management component to deal with these ongoing issues. While the Arctic Council and other key international mechanisms are reluctant to address sustainable harvest and wildlife issues of relevance to Inuit, ICC (Canada) continues to find other avenues in which to defend the rights of Inuit.
Documents

icc_annual_report__oct10_.pdf

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Assessment of the potential health impacts of climate change in Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287905
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
..........................................................................................19 3.1.3 Exposure to Potentially Hazardous Materials ......................................................21 3.1.4 Food, Nutrition, and Subsistence Activity ...........................................................24 3.1.5 Infectious Diseases and Toxins from Microorganisms
  1 document  
Author
Yoder, Sarah
Author Affiliation
Alaska Section of Epidemiology
Source
Bulletin. State of Alaska Epidemiology. Recommendations and Reports. 2018 Jan 8; 20(1)
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Sea levels
Permafrost
Glaciers
Weather patterns
Sea ice
Temperature
Subsistence
Infectious disease
Sanitation
Health services
Abstract
Background: Over the past century, the air and water temperatures in Alaska have warmed considerably faster than in the rest of the United States. Because Alaska is the only Arctic state in the Nation, Alaskans are likely to face some climate change challenges that will be different than those encountered in other states. For example, permafrost currently underlies 80% of Alaska and provides a stable foundation for the physical infrastructure of many Alaska communities. As has already been seen in numerous villages, the groundcover that overlies permafrost is vulnerable to sinking or caving if the permafrost thaws, resulting in costly damage to physical infrastructure. The reliance on subsistence resources is another contrast to many other states. Many Alaskans depend upon subsistence harvests of fish and wildlife resources for food and to support their way of life. Some Alaskans report that the changing environment has already impacted their traditional practices. Many past efforts to characterize the potential impacts of climate change in Alaska have focused primarily on describing expected changes to the physical environment and the ecosystem, and less on describing how these changes, in addition to changes in animal and environmental health, could affect human health. Thus, a careful analysis of how climate change could affect the health of people living in Alaska is warranted. The Alaska Division of Public Health has conducted such an assessment using the Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework; the assessment is based on the current National Climate Assessment (NCA) predictions for Alaska. The document is intended to provide a broad overview of the potential adverse human health impacts of climate change in Alaska and to present examples of adaptation strategies for communities to consider when planning their own response efforts. This document does not present a new model for climate change in Alaska, and it does not offer a critique of the NCA predictions for Alaska.
Documents

AssessmentofthePotentialHealthImpactsof.pdf

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Source
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, with collaboration from the Alaska Food Policy Council.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 2014
  FINDING  FOOD  IN  ALASKA  ...............................................................................................................  13   SUBSISTENCE  HARVEST  OF  WILD  FOODS  ...................................................................................  35   SPORT
  1 document  
Author
Meter, Ken
Goldenberg, Megan Phillips
Author Affiliation
Crossroads Resource Center, Minneapolis
Source
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, with collaboration from the Alaska Food Policy Council.
Date
July 2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
11978402
Keywords
Alaska
Food security
Subsistence
Hunting
Fishing
Health
Documents
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45 records – page 1 of 5.