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Alcohol consumption, blood pressure, and the risk of stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101849
Source
Curr Hypertens Rep. 2011 Jun;13(3):208-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Matti Hillbom
Pertti Saloheimo
Seppo Juvela
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Oulu University Hospital, Box 20, Oulu 90 029 OYS, Finland. matti.hillbom@oulu.fi
Source
Curr Hypertens Rep. 2011 Jun;13(3):208-13
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cerebral Hemorrhage - chemically induced
Circadian Rhythm
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - chemically induced - complications - mortality
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - chemically induced
Abstract
A synergistic effect of alcohol and hypertension has been suggested to increase the risk for stroke. However, the contribution of alcohol-induced hypertension to stroke morbidity and mortality may be greater than observed, because the effects of different drinking patterns have not been separately investigated. Alcohol-induced transient peaks in systolic blood pressure may predispose to stroke. Recent studies have measured time trends of blood pressure elevations in relation to alcohol consumption. They found a significant morning surge in blood pressure, which was related to alcohol intake in a dose-dependent manner and was independent of smoking. Men with a severe form of hypertension showed a 12-fold increased risk for cardiovascular disease mortality associated with heavy binge drinking. Binge drinking is a significant risk factor for stroke. Hypertensive patients should be warned about the risks of alcohol and urged to avoid binge drinking because of an increased risk for all subtypes of stroke.
PubMed ID
21327566 View in PubMed
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High-dose estrogen-progestagen oral contraceptives: a risk factor for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235005
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1987 Jul;76(1):37-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1987
Author
B. Lindegård
M. Hillbom
S. Brody
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1987 Jul;76(1):37-45
Date
Jul-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Estradiol Congeners - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Intracranial Aneurysm - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Progesterone Congeners - adverse effects
Risk
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - chemically induced
Sweden
Abstract
A 10-year follow-up (1970-79) of a defined general population (n = 159 200) of middle-aged (born in 1911-40), urban, native Swedes, revealed that the prevalence rate of subarachnoid hemorrhage was 2.8 times higher in females than in males. This was mainly due to an accumulation of non-hypertensive aneurysmal subarachnoid bleeds in women born in the period 1932-40. The cases were significantly (P less than 0.001) overrepresented among divorced women, with relative risks of 1.89, 0.98 and 0.63 for divorced women, married women and spinsters (never married), respectively. Since high-dose estrogen-progestagen oral contraceptives have largely been used by the younger members of this study cohort, it may be speculated whether the observed substantial excess prevalence rate of subarachnoid hemorrhage with saccular aneurysm, not reported previously, represents a cohort effect unexpected after the introduction of low-dose oral contraceptives.
PubMed ID
3630643 View in PubMed
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Risk of stroke associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67344
Source
Stroke. 2003 Feb;34(2):379-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Søren Bak
Morten Andersen
Ioannis Tsiropoulos
Luis Alberto García Rodríguez
Jesper Hallas
Kaare Christensen
David Gaist
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Stroke. 2003 Feb;34(2):379-86
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Brain Ischemia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cerebral Hemorrhage - chemically induced - epidemiology
Cerebrovascular Accident - chemically induced - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Risk assessment
Smoking - epidemiology
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - chemically induced - epidemiology
Twin Studies - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with bleeding complications and may affect the risk of hemorrhagic stroke through inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase-1. We performed a population-based case-control study to estimate the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke in users of NSAIDs. METHODS: We used a population-based patient registry to identify all patients with a first-ever stroke discharge diagnosis in the period of 1994 to 1999. All diagnoses were validated according to predefined criteria. We selected 40 000 random controls from the background population. Information on drug use for cases and controls was retrieved from a prescription registry. Odds ratios were adjusted for age, sex, calendar year, and use of other medication. To evaluate the effect of various potential confounders not recorded in the register, we performed separate analyses on data from 2 large population-based surveys with more detailed information on risk factors. RESULTS: The cases were classified as intracerebral hemorrhage (n=659), subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=208), and ischemic stroke (n=2717). The adjusted odds ratio of stroke in current NSAID users compared with never users was 1.2 (95% CI, 0.9 to 1.6) for intracerebral hemorrhage, 1.2 (95% CI, 0.7 to 2.1) for subarachnoid hemorrhage and 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 1.4) for ischemic stroke. The survey data indicated that additional confounder control would not have led to an increase in relative risk estimates. CONCLUSIONS: Current exposure to NSAIDs is not a risk factor for intracerebral hemorrhage or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, NSAIDs probably offer no protection against first-ever ischemic stroke.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2003 Feb;34(2):379-8612577953
Comment In: Stroke. 2003 Jun;34(6):e34-6; author reply e34-612750529
PubMed ID
12574546 View in PubMed
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Smoking and non-smoking tobacco as risk factors in subarachnoid haemorrhage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81855
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2006 Jul;114(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Koskinen L-O D
Blomstedt P C
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. lars-owe.koskinen@neuro.umu.se
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2006 Jul;114(1):33-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cerebral Arteries - drug effects - pathology - physiopathology
Cerebrovascular Circulation - drug effects - physiology
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Intracranial Aneurysm - chemically induced - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Neurosurgical Procedures
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - chemically induced - epidemiology - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Swedish snuff is a particular form of non-smoking tobacco with high nicotine content. It is unknown whether this form of tobacco is a risk factor similar to smoking for suffering subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). In the present study we report our finding concerning smoking and snuff as risk factors for the disease. METHOD: We analysed 120 consecutive patients with SAH regarding consumption of tobacco, in order to evaluate if snuff also is associated with an increased risk of SAH. RESULTS: The relative risk of SAH was about 2.5 times higher for smokers compared with the background population. Consumption of snuff was not associated with an increased risk. CONCLUSIONS: It seems unlikely that nicotine is solely responsible for the rupture of cerebral aneurysms. The final cause of the increased risk for suffering SAH has to be sought in other factors associated with tobacco smoking.
PubMed ID
16774625 View in PubMed
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