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Accommodating a social work student with a speech impairment: the shared experience of a student and instructor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139086
Source
J Soc Work Disabil Rehabil. 2010;9(4):235-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kimberly Calderwood
Jonathan Degenhardt
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. kcalder@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Soc Work Disabil Rehabil. 2010;9(4):235-53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Male
Ontario
Social Justice
Social Work - education
Speech
Stuttering - psychology
Teaching
Abstract
This ethnographic study describes the results of a collaborative journaling process that occurred between a student and his instructor of a second-year social work communications course. Many questions from the student's and the instructor's perspectives are raised regarding accommodating the student with a severe speech impairment in a course that specifically focuses on communication skills. Preliminary recommendations are made for social work students and professionals with communication limitations, and for social work educators.
PubMed ID
21104514 View in PubMed
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The Peer Attitudes Toward Children who Stutter (PATCS) scale: an evaluation of validity, reliability and the negativity of attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154968
Source
Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2009 May-Jun;44(3):352-68
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marilyn Langevin
Sabina Kleitman
Ann Packman
Mark Onslow
Author Affiliation
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. marilyn.langevin@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2009 May-Jun;44(3):352-68
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Rejection (Psychology)
Social Perception
Stuttering - psychology
Abstract
Persistent calls for school-based education about stuttering necessitate a better understanding of peer attitudes toward children who stutter and a means to measure outcomes of such educational interventions. Langevin and Hagler in 2004 developed the Peer Attitudes Toward Children who Stutter scale (PATCS) to address these needs and gave preliminary evidence of reliability and construct validity.
To examine further the psychometric properties of PATCS and to examine the negativity of attitudes.
PATCS was administered to 760 Canadian children in grades 3-6. Measures included reliability, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), a known groups analysis, convergent validity with the Pro-Victim Scale of Rigby and Slee, and the negativity of attitudes.
PATCS appears to tap a second-order general attitude factor and three first-order factors representing the constructs of Positive Social Distance (PSD), Social Pressure (SP), and Verbal Interaction (VI). In the known groups analysis, participants who had contact with someone who stutters had higher scores (more positive attitudes) than those who had not, and girls had higher scores than boys. PATCS correlated moderately (0.43, p
PubMed ID
18821107 View in PubMed
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[Therapeutic and corrective work with stammering preschool children in a daytime semi-hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237773
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1986;86(10):1565-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
A A Mokrovskaia
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1986;86(10):1565-9
Date
1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Moscow
Psychotherapy, Group
Speech Therapy
Speech-Language Pathology
Stuttering - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Therapeutic and corrective work with stammering preschool children conducted at a day-time semi-hospital institution presents a complex of measures aimed at improving the speech and the entire psychic activity of the child. A semi-hospital form of the organization makes it possible, along with therapeutic and corrective measures, to constantly train the speech in the most diverse situations of the microsocial environment outside the hospital and thus contributes to the development of social and adaptive behaviour which the child needs for further studying in the general education school.
PubMed ID
3544614 View in PubMed
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