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A 3-year follow-up of headache diagnoses and symptoms in Swedish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81846
Source
Cephalalgia. 2006 Jul;26(7):809-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Laurell K.
Larsson B.
Mattsson P.
Eeg-Olofsson O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. katarina.laurell@akademiska.se
Source
Cephalalgia. 2006 Jul;26(7):809-15
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Migraine Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Students - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Tension-Type Headache - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Information is sparse concerning the incidence and prognosis of headache in children from the general population, especially of tension-type headache. In this study, headache diagnoses and symptoms were reassessed in 122 out of 130 schoolchildren after 3 years. Nearly 80% of those with headache at first evaluation still reported headache at follow-up. Although the likelihood of experiencing the same headache diagnosis and symptoms was high, about one-fifth of children with tension-type headache developed migraine and vice versa. Female gender predicted migraine and frequent headache episodes predicted overall headache at follow-up. The estimated average annual incidence was 81 and 65 per 1000 children, for tension-type headache and migraine, respectively. We conclude that there is a considerable risk of developing and maintaining headache during childhood. Headache diagnoses should be reassessed regularly and treatment adjusted. Girls and children with frequent headache have a poorer prognosis and therefore intervention is particularly important in these groups.
PubMed ID
16776695 View in PubMed
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Access to a school health nurse and adolescent health needs in the universal school health service in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302526
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2019 Mar; 33(1):165-175
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Hanne Kivimäki
Vesa Saaristo
Kirsi Wiss
Marjut Frantsi-Lankia
Timo Ståhl
Arja Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Researcher, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2019 Mar; 33(1):165-175
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
School Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Universal school health services are expected to offer similar, needs-based services to all students across schools, service providers and students' socio-economic statuses and health needs. This study investigates access to school health nurses in Finland. The objectives were to study the differences in access to school health nurse between service providers, schools, students' characteristics and school health nurse resources. Access was examined through a nationwide School Health Promotion study, which is a self-reporting, voluntary and anonymous survey for 8th and 9th graders (15 to 16-year old, N = 71865). The ethical committee of the National Institute for Health and Welfare has approved procedure for the School Health Promotion study. Data on school health nurse resources and service providers were obtained from the national database (534 schools; 144 service providers). Multilevel logistic regression was used. Of the pupils, 15% of girls and 11% of boys reported difficult access to a school health nurse. The number of adolescents who reported difficult access ranged between service providers (0%-41%) and schools (0%-75%). Students with lower socio-economic background, poorer well-being at school, lack of support for studying and greater health needs reported difficult access more often. School health nurse resources were associated with difficult access only among boys, when resources were under the national recommendations. These findings raise concern about equality and unmet health needs in school health services.
PubMed ID
30276842 View in PubMed
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Adolescent elite athletes' cigarette smoking, use of snus, and alcohol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258381
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Apr;24(2):439-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
M. Martinsen
J. Sundgot-Borgen
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sport Trauma Research Center, The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Apr;24(2):439-46
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Performance-Enhancing Substances
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sports
Students - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco, Smokeless - utilization
Abstract
The purpose was to examine cigarette smoking, use of snus, alcohol, and performance-enhancing illicit drugs among adolescent elite athletes and controls, and possible gender and sport group differences. First-year students at 16 Norwegian Elite Sport High Schools (n = 677) and two randomly selected high schools (controls, n = 421) were invited to participate. Totally, 602 athletes (89%) and 354 (84%) controls completed the questionnaire. More controls than athletes were smoking, using snus, and drinking alcohol. Competing in team sports was associated with use of snus [odds ratio = 2.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6 to 4.7] and a similar percentage of male and female handball (22.2% vs 18.8%) and soccer players (15.7% vs 15.0%) reported using snus. For controls, not participating in organized sport was a predictor for smoking (odds ratio = 4.9, 95% CI 2.2 to 10.9). Female athletes were more prone to drink alcohol than males (46.3% vs 31.0%, P
PubMed ID
22830488 View in PubMed
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Adolescent gambling and coping within a generalized high-risk behavior framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162924
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2007 Dec;23(4):377-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Anton van Hamel
Jeffrey Derevensky
Yoshio Takane
Laurie Dickson
Rina Gupta
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High Risk Behaviors, McGill University, 3724 McTavish Street, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2007 Dec;23(4):377-93
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Anxiety
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Self-Assessment
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Data were collected for 1998 middle/high-school students in Ontario to assess involvement in gambling, substance use, and generalized risky behavior. To predict these outcomes, measures for anxiety, family cohesion, and coping style were also administered. Three a-priori models were posited to account for the impact of risk factors, protective factors, and combined risk/protective factors on the development of risky behaviors. A high-risk cohort composed of subjects endorsing at least one risky behavior (gambling, substance use, or generalized risky behavior) within the clinical range was created to test an unobserved outcome variable created from all three measures of risky behavior, which was successfully predicted by two of the three a-priori models. Implications for the inclusion of gambling within a constellation of high-risk behaviors and recommendations for future prevention efforts are discussed.
PubMed ID
17577646 View in PubMed
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Adolescent gambling and problem gambling: does the total consumption model apply?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160670
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Jun;24(2):135-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Marianne Hansen
Ingeborg Rossow
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Sentrum, P.O. Box 565, Oslo 0105, Norway. mh@sirus.no
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Jun;24(2):135-49
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Behavior, Addictive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - diagnosis - epidemiology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Models, Psychological
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study describes the extent and distribution of gambling among Norwegian adolescents. The study assesses whether gambling frequency and expenditures and prevalence of problem gambling are associated both at the individual and aggregate (school) level, and in particular whether the total consumption model applies to gambling behaviour. Data comprised a national representative sample of 11,637 13- to 19-year-old students in 73 schools (response rate 92.3%). The Lie/Bet Questionnaire and an additional DSM-criterion on chasing the losses were applied to assess problem gambling. A majority (78.5%) had gambled during the last year and 3.1% met all three criteria for problem gambling. Gambling frequency and expenditures were much higher among problem gamblers and increased proportionally with the degree of problem gambling. The 6.1% who scored on both Lie/Bet items accounted for 59% of all gambling expenditures on slot machines. Positive and significant correlations between various indicators of problem gambling and the overall amount of gambling at the aggregate (school) level imply that the higher the overall amount of gambling and gambling expenditures are, the higher the prevalence of problem gambling, which indicates that the total consumption model also applies to gambling behaviour among adolescents.
PubMed ID
17955348 View in PubMed
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Adolescent school absenteeism and service use in a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269789
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:626
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kristin Gärtner Askeland
Siren Haugland
Kjell Morten Stormark
Tormod Bøe
Mari Hysing
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:626
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Norway
Peer Group
Risk-Taking
Student Dropouts
Students - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
School absenteeism is linked to a range of health concerns, health risk behaviors and school dropout. It is therefore important to evaluate the extent to which adolescents with absenteeism are in contact with health care and other services. The aim of the current study was to investigate service use of Norwegian adolescents with moderate and high absenteeism in comparison to students with lower rates of absence.
The study employs data from a population-based study from 2012 targeting all pupils in upper secondary education in Hordaland County, Norway (the youth@hordaland-survey). A total of 8988 adolescents between the ages of 16 and 18 were included in the present study. Information on service use was based on adolescent self-report data collected in the youth@hordaland-survey. Absence data was collected using administrative data provided by the Hordaland County Council.
High absence (defined as being absent 15% or more the past semester) was found among 10.1% of the adolescents. Compared to their peers with low absence (less than 3% absence the past semester), adolescents with high absence were more likely to be in contact with all the services studied, including mental health services (odds ratio (OR) 3.96), adolescent health clinics (OR 2.11) and their general practitioner (GP) (OR 1.94). Frequency of contact was higher among adolescents with moderate and high absence and there seems to be a gradient of service use corresponding to the level of absence. Still, 40% of the adolescents with high absence had not been in contact with any services.
Adolescents with high absence had increased use of services, although a group of youth at risk seems to be without such contact. This finding suggests a potential to address school absenteeism through systematic collaboration between schools and health personnel.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26155938 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking: effect of school and community characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139245
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Chris Y Lovato
Cornelia Zeisser
H Sharon Campbell
Allison W Watts
Peter Halpin
Mary Thompson
John Eyles
Edward Adlaf
K Stephen Brown
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. chris.lovato@ubc.ca
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):507-14
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Organizational Policy
Residence Characteristics
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A substantial challenge in addressing adolescent tobacco use is that smoking behaviors occur in complex environments that involve the school setting and larger community context.
This study provides an integrated description of factors from the school and community environment that affect youth smoking and explains variation in individual smoking behaviors both within and across schools/communities.
Data were collected from 82 randomly sampled secondary schools in five Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, and Labrador) during the 2003-2004 school year. Cross-sectional data were obtained from students; school administrators (school-based tobacco control policies and programs); and from observations in the community. In 2009, hierarchic logistic regression was used to model the role of individual, school, and community variables in predicting student smoking outcomes.
Students who attended a school with a focus on tobacco prevention (OR=0.87, 95% CI=0.81, 0.94) and stronger policies prohibiting tobacco use (OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.88, 0.97) were less likely to smoke than students who attended a school without these characteristics. A student was more likely to smoke if a greater number of students smoked on the school periphery (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.07, 1.47). Within the community, price per cigarette (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.84, 0.99) and immigrants (OR=0.99, 95% CI=0.98, 0.99) were inversely related to students' smoking status.
The results suggest that school and community characteristics account for variation in smoking levels across schools. Based on the current findings, the ideal school setting that supports low student smoking levels is located in a neighborhood where the cost of cigarettes is high, provides tobacco prevention education, and has a policy prohibiting smoking.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):609-1021084083
PubMed ID
21084070 View in PubMed
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Age of first sexual intercourse and acculturation: effects on adult sexual responding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159354
Source
J Sex Med. 2008 Mar;5(3):571-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Jane S T Woo
Lori A Brotto
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia-Psychology, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Sex Med. 2008 Mar;5(3):571-82
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Age Factors
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - ethnology
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological - ethnology
Social Values
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although age of first intercourse and the emotional aspects of that experience are often a target in assessment because they are thought to contribute to later sexual functioning, research to date on how sexual debut relates to adult sexual functioning has been limited and contradictory.
The goal of this study was to explore the association between age of first intercourse and adult sexual function in a sample of Euro-Canadian and Asian Canadian university students. In addition, culture-based comparisons of sexual complaints were made to clarify the role of culture in sexual response.
Euro-Canadian (N = 299) and Asian Canadian (N = 329) university students completed the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction and the Vancouver Index of Acculturation.
Self-reported sexual problems and bidimensional acculturation.
Ethnic group comparisons revealed that Asians reported more sexual complaints including sexual avoidance, dissatisfaction and non-sensuality. Among the women, Asians reported higher scores on the Vaginismus and Anorgasmia subscales whereas the ethnic groups did not differ on the male-specific measures of sexual complaints. In the overall sample, older age of first intercourse was associated with more sexual problems as an adult, including more sexual infrequency, sexual avoidance, and non-sensuality. Among the Asian Canadians, less identification with Western culture was predictive of more sexual complaints overall, more sexual noncommunication, more sexual avoidance, and more non-sensuality. For Asian women, acculturation interacted with age of first intercourse to predict Vaginismus scores.
Overall, these data replicate prior research that found that a university sample of individuals of Asian descent have higher rates of sexual problems and that this effect can be explained by acculturation. Earlier sexual debut was associated with fewer sexual complaints in adulthood.
PubMed ID
18194176 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, drugs, and family violence: perceptions of high school students in southwest Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5110
Source
Pages 459-466 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
  1 document  
Author
Seyfrit, C.L.
Crossland, C.R.
Hamilton, L.C.
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.
Source
Pages 459-466 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Domestic Violence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Rural Population
Sex Distribution
Social Perception
Students - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
Many programs have attempted to address alcohol and drug use and family violence as issues of public health. This paper examines the degree to which high school students in Southwest Alaska identify these issues as problems in their communities. Qualitative and quantitative data come from a 1995 survey of children in grades 9 to 12 in four villages, one town, and one boarding school in Alaska. Alcohol policies differ in rural Alaska, with "dry" communities banning alcohol possession, "damp" communities allowing alcohol possession but not sale, and "wet" communities permitting purchase and importation of alcohol. Although the majority of all students believe alcohol and drugs are problems in their communities, only 45% of town students and 22% of village students report too much family violence in their communities. Qualitative data indicate that alcohol and drugs are of concern to young people. One female student, when asked if she would be a successful person, responded "Yes, because I look at mydrunk relatives and tell myself, that will never happen to me."
PubMed ID
10093325 View in PubMed
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210 records – page 1 of 21.