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174 records – page 1 of 18.

Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Educational Status
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal, requesting funding to continue successful elements developed under the demonstration grant and to expand mental health services. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for school year 2001-2002. Once funds were received, the site chose to shift Therapeutic Residential Model funds to an intensive academic enhancement effort. While not in compliance with the Therapeutic Residential Model initiative and therefore not funded in subsequent years, this site created the opportunity to enhance the research design by providing a naturally occurring placebo condition at a site with extensive cross-sectional data baselines that addressed issues related to current federal educational policies.
PubMed ID
17602403 View in PubMed
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Adolescent risk factors for excessive alcohol use at age 32 years. A 16-year prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151566
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Jan;45(1):125-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Taina Huurre
Tomi Lintonen
Jaakko Kaprio
Mirjami Pelkonen
Mauri Marttunen
Hillevi Aro
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. taina.huurre@thl.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Jan;45(1):125-34
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Comorbidity
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Probability
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Class
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine which socioeconomic, family, personal and lifestyle risk factors in adolescence were the strongest independent predictors of excessive alcohol use in adulthood.
In a prospective longitudinal study, all 16-year-olds of one Finnish city completed questionnaires at school, and were followed up by postal questionnaires at 32 years of age [n = 1,471, (females n = 805, males n = 666); response rate 70.3%). The alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) was used to assess alcohol use in adulthood. AUDIT scores of 8 or more for females and 10 or more for males were classified as excessive alcohol use. Adolescent risk factors examined were parental social class, school performance, depressive symptoms, self-esteem, impulsiveness, parental divorce, relationships with parents, parental trust, health behaviour, leisure-time spent with friends, dating, and problems with the law.
All the socioeconomic, family, personal, and lifestyle variables in adolescence, except parental social class in both genders and self-esteem among females, showed significant univariate associations with excessive alcohol use at age 32 years. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that among adolescent males, parental divorce, moderate and high level of depressive symptoms, leisure-time spent daily among friends and moderate and drunkenness-orientated drinking were the strongest predictors of excessive alcohol use in adulthood. Among females, the strongest adolescent predictors of excessive alcohol use in adulthood were drunkenness-orientated drinking and frequent smoking.
Early interventions for adolescent substance use and a set of specific psychosocial risk factors should be tailored and evaluated as methods for identifying those at high risk of and preventing excessive alcohol use in adulthood.
PubMed ID
19363578 View in PubMed
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Adolescent self-reported health in relation to school factors: a multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261997
Source
J Sch Nurs. 2014 Apr;30(2):114-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Karina Nygren
Erik Bergström
Urban Janlert
Lennart Nygren
Source
J Sch Nurs. 2014 Apr;30(2):114-22
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bullying - psychology
Child
Female
Health status
Health Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Multilevel Analysis
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Schools
Self Report
Sex Distribution
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine school-related determinants of self-reported health among adolescents. Questionnaire survey data comprising 4,972 students, Grades 7 through 9, from 20 schools in northern Sweden were used. Also, complimentary data about each school were collected from the Swedish National Agency for Education. Using multilevel logistic regression analyses, results showed that most variation in self-reported health was explained by individual-level differences. Truancy, bullying, and poor relations with teachers significantly increased the odds ratio of reporting poor general health, for boys and for girls. Most variables at the school level, for example, school size and student-teacher ratio, did not render significant associations with students' self-reported health. In conclusion, this study indicates that health promotion at school, including school health services, may benefit from focusing primarily on individual-level determinants of health, that is, students' relations to peers and teachers, without ignoring that bullying and weak student-teacher relationships also may induce school-level interventions.
PubMed ID
23674554 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' lifetime experience of selling sex: development over five years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114699
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2013;22(3):312-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Cecilia Fredlund
Frida Svensson
Carl Göran Svedin
Gisela Priebe
Marie Wadsby
Author Affiliation
Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2013;22(3):312-25
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Prostitution - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - ethnology
Time Factors
Abstract
Lifetime experience of selling sex among adolescents was investigated together with sociodemographic correlates, parent-child relationship, and the existence of people to confide in. Changes over time regarding the selling of sex were investigated through a comparison of data from 2004 and 2009. This study was carried out using 3,498 adolescents from a representative sample of Swedish high school students with a mean age 18.3 years. Of these adolescents, 1.5% stated that they had given sexual services for reimbursement and both male and female buyers existed. The adolescents who had sold sex had a poorer parent-child relationship during childhood and had fewer people to confide in about problems and worries. Changes over time were found especially regarding the Internet as a contact source and also immigrant background.
PubMed ID
23590352 View in PubMed
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Affective and cognitive correlates of gambling behavior in university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139012
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2011 Sep;27(3):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Antonio Pascual-Leone
Kevin Gomes
Emily S Orr
Kristen A Kaploun
Christopher A Abeare
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada. apl@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2011 Sep;27(3):401-8
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cognition
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gambling - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Motivation
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Social Environment
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the following study was to explore certain affective and cognitive components and their relationships to gambling behavior in an undergraduate population. Specifically, the aim was to predict gambling severity using depression scores on the BDI-II, the dependency and self-criticism subscales on the DEQ, emotional awareness scores on the LEAS, cognitive flexibility scores from the STROOP, and a creativity subtests from the TTCT. Participants were 200 undergraduate students and 3.5-7.5% of individuals reported some level of problematic gambling behavior. Multiple regression analysis indicated that self-criticism and creative originality were significant predictors of gambling behavior, explaining 7.6% of the variance. Further analyses reveal a non-linear trend in the creative originality of those who gamble; only the at-risk gamblers were high in creativity whereas abstainers and problematic gamblers display similarly lower levels of creativity. Results are discussed in regards to Blaszczynski and Nower's Addiction 97:487-499 (2002) subtypes of gambling vulnerability.
PubMed ID
21113732 View in PubMed
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Alcohol assessment and feedback by email for university students: main findings from a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107016
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):334-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Jim McCambridge
Marcus Bendtsen
Nadine Karlsson
Ian R White
Per Nilsen
Preben Bendtsen
Author Affiliation
Jim McCambridge, PhD, Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Marcus Bendtsen, MSc, Department of Medicine and Health, and Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Nadine Karlsson, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Ian R. White, PhD, MRC, Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, UK; Per Nilsen, PhD, Preben Bendtsen, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):334-40
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Binge Drinking - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Internet
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Brief interventions can be efficacious in changing alcohol consumption and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk populations such as students.
To evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, controlling for the possible effects of the research process.
A three-arm parallel groups design was used to explore the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The three groups were: alcohol assessment and feedback (group 1); alcohol assessment only without feedback (group 2); and no contact, and thus neither assessment nor feedback (group 3). Outcomes were evaluated after 3 months via an invitation to participate in a brief cross-sectional lifestyle survey. The study was undertaken in two universities randomising the email addresses of all 14 910 students (the AMADEUS-1 study, trial registration: ISRCTN28328154).
Overall, 52% (n = 7809) of students completed follow-up, with small differences in attrition between the three groups. For each of the two primary outcomes, there was one statistically significant difference between groups, with group 1 having 3.7% fewer risky drinkers at follow-up than group 3 (P = 0.006) and group 2 scoring 0.16 points lower than group 3 on the three alcohol consumption questions from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) (P = 0.039).
This study provides some evidence of population-level benefit attained through intervening with individual students.
PubMed ID
24072758 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-induced memory blackouts as an indicator of injury risk among college drinkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133405
Source
Inj Prev. 2012 Feb;18(1):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Marlon P Mundt
Larissa I Zakletskaia
David D Brown
Michael F Fleming
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. marlon.mundt@fammed.wisc.edu
Source
Inj Prev. 2012 Feb;18(1):44-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Amnesia - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
An alcohol-induced memory blackout represents an amnesia to recall events but does not involve a loss of consciousness. Memory blackouts are a common occurrence among college drinkers, but it is not clear if a history of memory blackouts is predictive of future alcohol-related injury above and beyond the risk associated with heavy drinking episodes.
To determine whether baseline memory blackouts can prospectively identify college students with alcohol-related injury in the next 24 months after controlling for heavy drinking days.
Data were analysed from the College Health Intervention Project Study (CHIPS), a randomised controlled trial of screening and brief physician intervention for problem alcohol use among 796 undergraduate and 158 graduate students at four university sites in the USA and one in Canada, conducted from 2004 to 2009. Multivariate analyses used generalised estimating equations with the logit link.
The overall 24-month alcohol-related injury rate was 25.6%, with no significant difference between men and women (p=0.51). Alcohol-induced memory blackouts at baseline exhibited a significant dose-response on odds of alcohol-related injury during follow-up, increasing from 1.57 (95% CI 1.13 to 2.19) for subjects reporting 1-2 memory blackouts at baseline to 2.64 (95% CI 1.65 to 4.21) for students acknowledging 6+ memory blackouts at baseline. The link between memory blackouts and injury was mediated by younger age, prior alcohol-related injury, heavy drinking, and sensation-seeking disposition.
Memory blackouts are a significant predictor of future alcohol-related injury among college drinkers after adjusting for heavy drinking episodes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21708813 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use among college students: an international perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78170
Source
Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2007 May;20(3):213-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Karam Elie
Kypri Kypros
Salamoun Mariana
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, St George Hospital University Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon. egkaram@idraac.org
Source
Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2007 May;20(3):213-21
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Risk
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review of published articles during 2005-2006 on alcohol use among college students in Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe and South America assesses the prevalence of alcohol use, hazardous drinking and related problems, and reviews the effectiveness of intervention methods and implications for future research. RECENT FINDINGS: Research on alcohol use and related problems in college students is lacking in many regions of the world. We identified 26 papers in peer-reviewed journals, from Australia, Brazil, Ecuador, Egypt, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Lebanon, New Zealand, Nigeria, Sweden, The Netherlands and Turkey. SUMMARY: More comprehensive studies with systematic methodologies in the world regions reviewed here are needed to yield representative results on alcohol use and related risk and protective factors in college settings. College students in many countries are at elevated risk for heavy drinking, with serious immediate health risks, such as drink-driving and other substance use; and longer term risks, such as alcohol dependence. The prevalence of hazardous drinking in Australasia, Europe and South America appears similar to that in North America, but is lower in Africa and Asia. Alcohol policies should be reviewed and prevention programmes initiated in light of research evidence, for this high-risk population.
PubMed ID
17415072 View in PubMed
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Analysis of influential factors associated with the smoking behavior of aboriginal schoolchildren in remote Taiwanese mountainous areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123740
Source
J Sch Health. 2012 Jul;82(7):318-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Hsiao-Ling Huang
Chih-Cheng Hsu
Wu-Der Peng
Yea-Yin Yen
Ted Chen
Chih-Yang Hu
Hon-Yi Shi
Chien-Hung Lee
Fu-Li Chen
Pi-Li Lin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Hygiene, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung City 80708, Taiwan.
Source
J Sch Health. 2012 Jul;82(7):318-27
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Altitude
Confidence Intervals
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Peer Group
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Schools
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Social Environment
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A disparity in smoking behavior exists between the general and minority populations residing in Taiwan's mountainous areas. This study analyzed individual and environmental factors associated with children's smoking behavior in these areas of Taiwan.
In this school-based study, data on smoking behavior and related factors for mountain-dwelling students were obtained from the 2008 and 2009 Control of School-aged Children Smoking Study surveys. A representative sample (N = 1239) from 26 primary schools was included. The association among 3 groups (never-, former-, and current-smokers) and the potential variables were simultaneously examined using unordered polytomous logistic regression analysis.
Between 13% and 34% of ever-smokers reported that their first smoking experience was in third grade. More than 70% were found to have bought cigarettes and 87% reported that the tobacco retailers had sold them cigarettes. The significant factors for current-smokers were predisposing factors, ie, attitude toward smoking (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.21); reinforcing factors, ie, family smoked in front of me (AOR = 2.44), friends smoked in front of me (AOR = 16.24), and school staff smoked in front of me (AOR = 2.98); and enabling factors, ie, cigarette availability and accessibility (AOR = 2.16 and 2.42, respectively). A student's perceived punishment for smoking at school had a positive significant effect on the risk of being former-smokers (AOR = 1.57).
The findings provide a basis for school and community to design and implement effective anti-smoking programs for remote mountain-based students to further reduce youth smoking.
PubMed ID
22671948 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of behavioral health compliance and microbial risk factors on student populations within a high-density campus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118921
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(8):584-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jody F Decker
Robin M Slawson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. jdecker@wlu.ca
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(8):584-95
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Female
Hand Hygiene - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - prevention & control - transmission - virology
Male
Microbiological Techniques - methods - statistics & numerical data
Population Density
Residence Characteristics - classification - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Student Health Services - utilization
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this Canadian study was to assess student behavioral response to disease transmission risk, while identifying high microbial deposition/transmission sites.
A student survey was conducted during October 2009.
The methods included a survey of students to assess use of health services, vaccination compliance, and hygiene along with a microbial analysis of potential transmission sites targeting specific residence buildings on campus.
Results indicated that most students maintained that they were worried about H1N1 and reported making changes in hygienic behavior, with the majority not planning to be vaccinated. The microbial analysis indicated contamination of fomites in co-ed residences to be higher than either male or female student residences.
A consideration of physical space along with behavioral factors is required in order to properly assess risk pathways in the establishment of an evidence-based infection control plan for universities and their contiguous communities.
PubMed ID
23157200 View in PubMed
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174 records – page 1 of 18.