Skip header and navigation

Refine By

730 records – page 1 of 73.

The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 12-year Trend of Psychological Distress: National Study of Finnish University Students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285639
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Airi Oksanen
Katri Laimi
Katja Björklund
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Kristina Kunttu
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
The study aimed to explore changes in the prevalence of psychological distress and co-occurring psychological symptoms among 19-34 years old Finnish university students between the years 2000 and 2012.
The prevalence of perceived frequent psychological symptoms was compared in four nationwide cross-sectional student health surveys with random samples (N=11,502) in the following years: 2000 (N=3,174), 2004 (N=3,153), 2008 (N=2,750), and 2012 (N=2,425).
In the time phase from 2000 to 2012, the overall psychological distress (12-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-12) increased from 22% to 28%, while there was also an increase in the frequently experienced psychological symptoms (depressiveness from 13% to 15%, anxiety from 8% to 13%, concentration problems from 12% to 18%, and psychological tension from 13% to 18% with a peak prevalence observed in 2008). The co-occurrence of different psychological symptoms increased as well. Psychological distress was more common in females and in older students.
The findings suggest an increasing trend of frequent psychological distress among Finnish university students over the years from 2000 to 2012, with the peak prevalence occurring in 2008, which may reflect the growing multifaceted environmental demands.
PubMed ID
28662321 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Vardfacket. 1998 Feb 9;22(2):19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-1998

Academic Achievement of American Indian and Alaska Native Students: Does Social Emotional Competence Reduce the Impact of Poverty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290702
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2017; 24(1):1-29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Jennifer Chain
Valerie B Shapiro
Paul A LeBuffe
Ann McKay Bryson
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2017; 24(1):1-29
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Alaska Natives - psychology
Child
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Poverty - psychology
Social Skills
Students - psychology
Abstract
Social-emotional competence may be a protective factor for academic achievement among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students. This study used Fisher's r to Z transformations to test for group differences in the magnitude of relationships between social-emotional competence and achievement. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the variance in academic achievement explained by student race, poverty, and social-emotional competence, and the schoolwide percentage of students by race. Data are from 335 students across 6 schools. This study suggests that promoting social-emotional competence among AI/AN students could be a strategy for reducing disparities in academic achievement and the consequences of these disparities.
PubMed ID
28562835 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Educational Status
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal, requesting funding to continue successful elements developed under the demonstration grant and to expand mental health services. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for school year 2001-2002. Once funds were received, the site chose to shift Therapeutic Residential Model funds to an intensive academic enhancement effort. While not in compliance with the Therapeutic Residential Model initiative and therefore not funded in subsequent years, this site created the opportunity to enhance the research design by providing a naturally occurring placebo condition at a site with extensive cross-sectional data baselines that addressed issues related to current federal educational policies.
PubMed ID
17602403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic self-efficacy mediates the effects of school psychological climate on academic achievement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277760
Source
Sch Psychol Q. 2015 Mar;30(1):64-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Rune Høigaard
Velibor Bobo Kovac
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Tommy Haugen
Source
Sch Psychol Q. 2015 Mar;30(1):64-74
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Female
Goals
Humans
Male
Norway
Schools
Self Efficacy
Social Behavior
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of proximal and distal constructs on adolescent's academic achievement through self-efficacy. Participants included 482 ninth- and tenth- grade Norwegian students who completed a questionnaire designed to assess school-goal orientations, organizational citizenship behavior, academic self-efficacy, and academic achievement. The results of a bootstrapping technique used to analyze relationships between the constructs indicated that school-goal orientations and organizational citizenship predicted academic self-efficacy. Furthermore, school-goal orientation, organizational citizenship, and academic self-efficacy explained 46% of the variance in academic achievement. Mediation analyses revealed that academic self-efficacy mediated the effects of perceived task goal structure, perceived ability structure, civic virtue, and sportsmanship on adolescents' academic achievements. The results are discussed in reference to current scholarship, including theories underlying our hypothesis. Practical implications and directions for future research are suggested.
PubMed ID
24708286 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 1992 Nov;88(10):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
P A Pelletier
C. Brassard
S. Caty
D. Adam
Source
Can Nurse. 1992 Nov;88(10):37-40
Date
Nov-1992
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Career Choice
Humans
Nursing - standards
Ontario
Questionnaires
Students - psychology
Abstract
A research study was conducted in a francophone high school in Northern Ontario to examine students' perceptions of nursing and the influence of these perceptions on nursing as a career choice. All students in grades 11, 12 and 13 were invited to participate. Fifty-eight percent (n = 268) completed the questionnaire. Results showed that 37 percent of the respondents considered pursuing a career in the health sciences. Only 14% percent were interested in nursing. Respondents' comments suggest that the nurse is viewed favorably but the profession is perceived as a career that does not involve pleasant tasks, good working conditions or opportunities for professional advancement. Reasons advocated for choosing nursing were altruistic rather than career-oriented. Students saw nursing practice as occurring mainly in a hospital setting. Half of the respondents who had chosen nursing as a career opted to enroll in a university program and the other half chose a college program. Results suggest that nursing continues to face an image problem regarding its role in the health care system. In these times of job losses and budget cuts, the profession still needs to attract young recruits. This is the challenge we have to face.
PubMed ID
1490271 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: personal-family acculturation match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158048
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Yasmin Asvat
Vanessa L Malcarne
Author Affiliation
San Diego State University, CA 92120-4913, USA.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Cultural Characteristics
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Mass Screening
Parenting
Religion and Psychology
Social Identification
Social Values
Students - psychology
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal-family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000 ) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (Zimmerman & Mattia, 1999 ). For personal acculturation, individuals with high personal heritage culture identification reported fewer lifetime (but not past-year) depressive symptoms. In contrast, individuals with high personal mainstream culture identification reported more past-year (but not lifetime) depressive symptoms. The hypothesis that a match between personal and family acculturation orientation would be associated with fewer depressive symptoms was supported for heritage culture identification only. For past-year depression, the two match conditions (low or high personal and family heritage culture identification) were associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than a low personal/high family mismatch but did not differ from a high personal/low family mismatch. For lifetime depression, a high personal/high family match was associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than all other conditions. Findings suggests that, for Muslims, a match of high personal and high family heritage culture identification may act as a protective factor for the experience of depressive symptoms both in the short term (past year) and in the long term (lifetime).
PubMed ID
22023606 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
Less detail

730 records – page 1 of 73.