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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Academic dishonesty in nursing schools: an empirical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149336
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Donald L McCabe
Author Affiliation
Rutgers Business School, 111 Washington Street, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. dmccabe@andromeda.rutgers.edu
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Deception
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - ethics - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - ethics - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Plagiarism
Professional Misconduct - ethics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
Academic dishonesty, whether in the form of plagiarism or cheating on tests, has received renewed attention in the past few decades as pervasive use of the Internet and a presumed deterioration of ethics in the current generation of students has led some, perhaps many, to conclude that academic dishonesty is reaching epidemic proportions. What is lacking in many cases, including in the nursing profession, is empirical support of these trends. This article attempts to provide some of that empirical data and supports the conclusion that cheating is a significant issue in all disciplines today, including nursing. Some preliminary policy implications are also considered.
PubMed ID
19650608 View in PubMed
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Applicants to B.Sc.N., R.N., and R.P.N. nursing programs: differences and predictors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209699
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1997;29(4):113-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A M Myers
N E Keat
C. Pelkman
S E French
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies, University of Waterloo, Ontario.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1997;29(4):113-21
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Career Choice
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - statistics & numerical data
Education, Nursing, Diploma Programs - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing, Practical - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Questionnaires
School Admission Criteria
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We surveyed 205 applicants to three types of nursing programs (B.Sc.N., diploma-R.N., and diploma-R.N.A.) offered in Toronto, Ontario. Applicants were predominately white, unmarried women living within commuting distance of the institutions to which they applied. Applicants to practical nursing programs tended to be older than applicants to B.Sc.N. and diploma-R.N. programs, be married, have at least one dependant, come from blue-collar families, be out of school longer, and submit fewer applications. Applicants with dependants were 11 times more likely to choose R.P.N. over R.N. programs. Recency of graduation and high school average were predictive of choosing B.Sc.N. over R.N. programs. While this 1992 cohort had some appreciation for the challenges facing the nursing profession, most applicants still expected to secure full-time employment in acute care post-graduation. The data provide an important benchmark for comparing current and future cohorts of applicants with respect to socio-demographic characteristics and expectations of nursing as a career choice.
PubMed ID
9697439 View in PubMed
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Baccalaureate nursing students' attitudes toward poverty: implications for nursing curricula.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181772
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2004 Jan;43(1):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Wendy Sword
Linda Reutter
Donna Meagher-Stewart
Elizabeth Rideout
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, HSc 3N25, Faculty Sciences, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5. sword@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2004 Jan;43(1):13-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum - standards
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Poverty - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Stereotyping
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Given the link between poverty and health, nurses, in their work in hospitals and in the community, often come into contact with people who are poor. To be effective care providers, nurses must have an adequate understanding of poverty and a positive attitude toward people who are poor. This study examined attitudes toward poverty among baccalaureate nursing students (N = 740) at three Canadian universities. Students' attitudes were neutral to slightly positive. Personal experiences appeared to have an important influence on the development of favorable attitudes. The findings point to several considerations for nursing curricula. Students should not only be provided with classroom opportunities for critical exploration of poverty and its negative effects on individuals and society, but also have clinical learning experiences that bring them face-to-face with people who are poor, their health concerns, and the realities of their circumstances. Thoughtful critique of poverty-related issues and interpersonal contact may be effective strategies to foster attitude change.
PubMed ID
14748530 View in PubMed
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Change in depressive symptoms over higher education and professional establishment - a longitudinal investigation in a national cohort of Swedish nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142838
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:343
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anna Christensson
Bo Runeson
Paul W Dickman
Marjan Vaez
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Anna.Christensson@ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:343
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Education, Nursing
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nurses - psychology
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There are indications of a high prevalence of psychological distress among students in higher education and also that distress increases over the course of study. However, not all studies on student distress controlled for sociodemographic differences and few followed development of distress over an extended period through professional establishment. We investigated if there is an independent effect of time in education and the first two years in the profession on depressive symptoms and mapped change over the period in a national cohort of students.
Data came from LANE, a nation-wide longitudinal panel survey of Swedish nursing students (N = 1700) who responded to annual questionnaires over five years from 2002 to 2007. Depressive symptoms were measured by the Major Depression Inventory and change over time analysed in a linear mixed effects model for repeated measures.
There was a significant change in level of depressive symptoms over time: an increase from the first to later years in education and a decrease to levels similar to baseline after graduation and a year in the profession. The change in symptoms remained significant after adjustment for sociodemographic factors (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
20550704 View in PubMed
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Clinical supervision in perioperative nursing education in Sweden - A questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299676
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2017 May; 24:29-33
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2017

The Cultural Competence of Graduating Nursing Students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285883
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2017 Jan;28(1):98-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Hanna Repo
Tero Vahlberg
Leena Salminen
Irena Papadopoulos
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2017 Jan;28(1):98-107
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cultural Competency - education - psychology
Curriculum - trends
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Psychometrics - instrumentation - methods
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Transcultural Nursing - education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Cultural competence is an essential component in nursing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of cultural competence of graduating nursing students, to identify associated background factors to cultural competence, and furthermore to establish whether teaching multicultural nursing was implemented in nursing education.
A structured Cultural Competence Assessment Tool was used in a correlational design with a sample of 295 nursing students in southern Finland.
The level of cultural competence was moderate, and the majority of students had studied multicultural nursing. Minority background (p = .001), frequency of interacting with different cultures (p = .002), linguistic skills (p = .002), and exchange studies (p = .024) were positively associated to higher cultural competence.
To improve cultural competence in students, nursing education should provide continuous opportunities for students to interact with different cultures, develop linguistic skills, and provide possibilities for internationalization both at home and abroad.
PubMed ID
26873438 View in PubMed
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The effects of interprofessional education - Self-reported professional competence among prehospital emergency care nursing students on the point of graduation - A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285966
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2017 May;32:50-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
M. Castrèn
M. Mäkinen
J. Nilsson
V. Lindström
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2017 May;32:50-55
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Professional Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Self Report
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate whether interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) during the educational program had an impact on prehospital emergency care nurses' (PECN) self-reported competence towards the end of the study program. A cross-sectional study using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale was conducted. A comparison was made between PECN students from Finland who experienced IPE and IPC in the clinical setting, and PECN students from Sweden with no IPE and a low level of IPC. Forty-one students participated (Finnish n=19, Swedish n=22). The self-reported competence was higher among the Swedish students. A statistically significant difference was found in one competence area; legislation in nursing and safety planning (p
PubMed ID
28325485 View in PubMed
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Generic and professional outcomes of a general nursing education program--a national study of higher education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92212
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2008;5:Article32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Schüldt Håård Ulrika
Ohlén Joakim
Gustavsson Petter J
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet. ulrika.schuldt-haard@ki.se
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2008;5:Article32
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Professional Autonomy
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Specialties, Nursing - education
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Nursing education today is primarily catered within the framework of higher education and combined with a health care sector that is rapidly changing, this has put the focus on educational outcome. The present study focuses on this outcome in terms of generic and professional skills and the professional preparedness of the students. 1,110 students in their final semester of a general nursing program at 24 universities in Sweden responded to questionnaires. The results revealed that the students perceived themselves to have especially developed their information-seeking abilities, critical and analytical thinking and professional knowledge and skills, whereas they did not perceive their education to have similarly developed their understanding of people from other cultures or their engagement in the development of society. Significant differences between men and women in relation to educational outcome were found in almost all areas of the study.
PubMed ID
18764778 View in PubMed
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Graduating Finnish nurse students' interest in gerontological nursing--a survey study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133783
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2012 May;32(4):356-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Sanna Koskinen
Maija Hupli
Jouko Katajisto
Leena Salminen
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, Turku, Finland. smtkos@utu.fi
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2012 May;32(4):356-60
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Female
Finland
Geriatric Nursing - education
Humans
Male
Nursing Education Research
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to examine nurse students' interest in gerontological nursing and the factors enhancing and decreasing that interest. The quantitative data was collected in the autumn of 2009 using a structured instrument with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), which was developed for this study based on the literature review. Graduating nurse students (n=183) from three polytechnics in Southern Finland participated in the study. The data was analysed statistically using descriptive statistics and t-test for independent samples to indicate statistical significance. The students did not clearly state if they are interested in gerontological nursing as a future career choice or not. Students who had prior gerontological nursing work experience, women, and students who had learned about gerontological nursing through an independent course were the most interested in the field. The factors that enhance interest are the quality of gerontological nursing, the challenging aspects of the field and the opportunities for career advancement, the gerontological nursing education and the practical training in gerontological nursing. On the basis of the results, it seems that it is possible to enhance nurse students' interest in gerontological nursing as a future career choice.
PubMed ID
21665335 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.