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839 records – page 1 of 84.

Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jul 17;177(2):176-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-17-2007
Author
Jessie L McGowan
Patrick Ellis
Peter Tugwell
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jul 17;177(2):176-7
Date
Jul-17-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Libraries, Medical - utilization
Medical Informatics - standards - trends
Needs Assessment
Research
Students, Medical
Notes
Cites: Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):72-4, 416548438
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Mar 27;176(7):917-817389434
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Jul 18;175(2):129, 13116847269
Comment On: CMAJ. 2007 Mar 27;176(7):917-817389434
PubMed ID
17638959 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A clause of conscience against abortion for students?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64823
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 May 26;90(21):2021-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-1993

[A compilation of questionnaires on medical education. A specific part of education is always more valued because of its significance than because of its quality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183296
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Sep 4;100(36):2767-8, 2771-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2003
Author
Göran Thomé
Anna Arstam
Stefan Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Medicinska fakulteten, Lunds universitet. goran.thome@bma.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Sep 4;100(36):2767-8, 2771-2
Date
Sep-4-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Consumer Satisfaction
Education, Medical - standards
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Questionnaires
Societies, Medical
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
PubMed ID
14558191 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation and validation of the instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision for medical students in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280942
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):308
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Eva Öhman
Hassan Alinaghizadeh
Päivi Kaila
Håkan Hult
Gunnar H Nilsson
Helena Salminen
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 01;16(1):308
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Educational Measurement
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Learning
Primary Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Medical - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace
Abstract
Clinical learning takes place in complex socio-cultural environments that are workplaces for the staff and learning places for the students. In the clinical context, the students learn by active participation and in interaction with the rest of the community at the workplace. Clinical learning occurs outside the university, therefore is it important for both the university and the student that the student is given opportunities to evaluate the clinical placements with an instrument that allows evaluation from many perspectives. The instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision (CLES) was originally developed for evaluation of nursing students' clinical learning environment. The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the CLES instrument to measure medical students' perceptions of their learning environment in primary health care.
In the adaptation process the face validity was tested by an expert panel of primary care physicians, who were also active clinical supervisors. The adapted CLES instrument with 25 items and six background questions was sent electronically to 1,256 medical students from one university. Answers from 394 students were eligible for inclusion. Exploratory factor analysis based on principal component methods followed by oblique rotation was used to confirm the adequate number of factors in the data. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the dimensions of CLES instrument.
The construct validity showed a clearly indicated four-factor model. The cumulative variance explanation was 0.65, and the overall Cronbach's alpha was 0.95. All items loaded similarly with the dimensions in the non-adapted CLES except for one item that loaded to another dimension. The CLES instrument in its adapted form had high construct validity and high reliability and internal consistency.
CLES, in its adapted form, appears to be a valid instrument to evaluate medical students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in primary health care.
Notes
Cites: Med Teach. 2013 Dec;35(12):1014-2624050817
Cites: Med Teach. 2010;32(7):e294-920653372
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2015 Jan;52(1):361-725220932
Cites: Med Teach. 2005 Jun;27(4):326-3116024415
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2009 Oct;14(4):535-4618798005
Cites: Med Teach. 2010;32(12):947-5221090946
Cites: Med Teach. 2005 Jun;27(4):322-516024414
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2002 Mar;39(3):259-6711864649
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2011 Aug;16(3):359-7321188514
Cites: Med Educ. 2001 Oct;35(10):946-5611564199
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2014 Dec;19(5):721-4924638146
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2010 Sep;66(9):2085-9320626485
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2012 Dec;17(5):703-1622234383
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2014 Jul 09;14:13925004924
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 May;48(5):568-7220947082
Cites: Med Educ. 2000 Aug;34(8):648-5510964213
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2012 Jun;21(11-12):1785-822594389
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2008 Aug;45(8):1233-717803996
Cites: Med Educ. 2007 Jan;41(1):84-9117209896
PubMed ID
27905932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism in medical students: a longitudinal investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192564
Source
Med Educ. 2001 Nov;35(11):1034-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
M W Enns
B J Cox
J. Sareen
P. Freeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Med Educ. 2001 Nov;35(11):1034-42
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Art
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Personality
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
The personality of medical students may have an important impact on both their academic performance and emotional adjustment during medical school. There has been little systematic study of the impact of perfectionism on medical students. The present study sought to compare the perfectionism profile of medical students with that of a general arts student group and to examine the relationship among perfectionism, distress symptoms and academic expectations and satisfaction.
Medical students (n=96) and arts students (n=289) completed a baseline assessment including two multidimensional perfectionism scales. The medical students also completed measures of distress symptoms, personality (neuroticism, conscientiousness) and questions about their perceptions of their academic performance. Of the medical students, 58 completed a second set of questionnaires 6 months later (time 2).
First-, second- and third year medical students and first-year arts students.
In comparison with arts students, the perfectionism profile of medical students showed higher personal standards, lower doubts about actions and lower maladaptive perfectionism scores. In the medical students adaptive perfectionism (achievement striving) was significantly correlated with baseline academic performance expectations and conscientiousness and was predictive of dissatisfaction with academic performance at time 2. Maladaptive perfectionism (excessive evaluative concerns) was significantly correlated with baseline distress symptoms and neuroticism and was predictive of symptoms of depression and hopelessness at time 2.
Perfectionism in medical students differs systematically from perfectionism in general arts students. Distinguishing adaptive and maladaptive aspects of perfectionism is important in understanding the cross-sectional and longitudinal implications of perfectionism for medical students.
PubMed ID
11703639 View in PubMed
Less detail

Admission criteria and diversity in medical school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113996
Source
Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):557-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Lotte O'Neill
Maria C Vonsild
Birgitta Wallstedt
Tim Dornan
Author Affiliation
Centre of Medical Education, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. lotte@medu.au.dk
Source
Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):557-61
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Diversity
Denmark
Education, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Parents - education
Prospective Studies
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Underachievement
Young Adult
Abstract
The under-representation in medical education of students from lower socio-economic backgrounds is an important social issue. There is currently little evidence about whether changes in admission strategies might increase the diversity of the medical student population. Denmark introduced an 'attribute-based' admission track to make it easier for students who may not be eligible for admission on the 'grade-based' track to be admitted on the basis of attributes other than academic performance. The aim of this research was to examine whether there were significant differences in the social composition of student cohorts admitted via each of the two tracks during the years 2002-2007.
This prospective cohort study included 1074 medical students admitted during 2002-2007 to the University of Southern Denmark medical school. Of these, 454 were admitted by grade-based selection and 620 were selected on attributes other than grades. To explore the social mix of candidates admitted on each of the two tracks, respectively, we obtained information on social indices associated with educational attainment in Denmark (ethnic origin, father's education, mother's education, parenthood, parents living together, parent in receipt of social benefits).
Selection strategy (grade-based or attribute-based) had no statistically significant effect on the social diversity of the medical student population.
The choice of admission criteria may not be very important to widening access and increasing social diversity in medical schools. Attracting a sufficiently diverse applicant pool may represent a better strategy for increasing diversity in the student population.
Notes
Comment In: Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):542-423662869
PubMed ID
23662872 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohol and drug use among medical students 1995: more than every tenth male student had hazardous alcohol drinking habits]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10642
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 14;96(28-29):3253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-1999
Author
B. Borschos
E. Kühlhorn
U. Rydberg
Author Affiliation
Sociologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet. borschos@sociology.su.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 14;96(28-29):3253-8
Date
Jul-14-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Students, Medical - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During the spring of 1995, 734 medical students at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm were randomly selected for inclusion in a postal questionnaire study of alcohol and drug habits. The response rate was over 80 per cent. Although both the level of alcohol consumption and the prevalence of hazardous consumption were lower than the corresponding figures for students at Stockholm and Uppsala Universities, 12 per cent of the male and four per cent of the female medical students were considered to be at risk of alcohol problems. About seven per cent of the medical students reported having used illegal drugs such as hashish, marijuana and cocaine during the past 12-month period, and about nine per cent to have used sedative and/or hypnotic drugs.
PubMed ID
10434509 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohol drinking among medical students is alarming. Available preventive programs should be used]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10643
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 14;96(28-29):3228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-14-1999
Author
M. Berglund
K. Johnsson
Author Affiliation
Alkohol- och narkotikakliniken, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 14;96(28-29):3228-9
Date
Jul-14-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Humans
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
10434501 View in PubMed
Less detail

839 records – page 1 of 84.