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The acceptability of HPV vaccination among women attending the University of Saskatchewan Student Health Services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141558
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Jul;32(7):679-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Christopher Giede
Laura Lee McFadden
Pam Komonoski
Anita Agrawal
Ardelle Stauffer
Roger Pierson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Jul;32(7):679-86
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Student Health Services
Universities
Abstract
Women attending the University of Saskatchewan Student Health Services are being offered human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination but are not filling their prescriptions. We sought to identify gaps in knowledge of the link between HPV infection, cervical dysplasia, and cervical cancer among women attending the Student Health Services, and to identify barriers to HPV vaccination among this cohort of women.
Women attending the University of Saskatchewan Student Health Services for any reason were invited to complete an 18-question survey. The survey included questions regarding knowledge of the purpose of Pap smears, the role of HPV infection in cervical dysplasia and cancer, and HPV vaccination. The questions were designed to elicit both quantitative and qualitative data. Data analysis included basic descriptive analysis and summarization of qualitative data.
Four hundred surveys were distributed, and 371 (91%) were returned. Eighty-two percent of participants were aware of the HPV vaccine, and 40% ranked their knowledge of HPV as good or very good; however, only 6% correctly answered questions about methods of preventing HPV infection. Participants identified cost (62%), concerns over adverse effects (43%), and lack of knowledge (36%) as barriers to undergoing vaccination. Comments about the HPV vaccine reflected frustration with cost and concerns about adverse effects. When participants were asked if they would undergo vaccination if it were free, 60% responded "yes," 31% responded "maybe," and 8% responded "no."
The young women in our survey had significant gaps in knowledge of HPV infection and prevention, and educational programs must be structured to address these deficits. Institutions promoting vaccination must deal with the barriers of cost and fear of adverse effects.
PubMed ID
20707957 View in PubMed
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Addressing the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, queer, and questioning clients within university psychiatric services: reflections and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174981
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2003;22(2):59-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Jude Tate
Lori E Ross
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2003;22(2):59-68
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality - psychology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Homosexuality - psychology
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Program Development
Student Health Services - organization & administration
Transsexualism - psychology
Abstract
Concerns still exist among lesbian-, gay-, bisexual-, transgendered-, and queer-identified individuals (LGBTQ individuals) about their reception and treatment by psychiatric service providers. The Psychiatric Service at the University of Toronto and the Office of LGBTQ Resources and Programs convened a committee to address expanding the capacities of the Service related to the needs of LGBTQ and questioning students. In this paper, we describe the committee's role, initiatives, and successes and discuss challenges encountered in the process. The model of community development drawn from in this work can be adapted for use in other community health settings.
PubMed ID
15868838 View in PubMed
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After initial risk-taking, most Canadian students use effective methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247744
Source
Fam Plann Perspect. 1979 Jan-Feb;11(1):44
Publication Type
Article
Source
Fam Plann Perspect. 1979 Jan-Feb;11(1):44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Contraception
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Student Health Services
Students
PubMed ID
421879 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol assessment & feedback by e-mail for university student hazardous and harmful drinkers: study protocol for the AMADEUS-2 randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105186
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:949
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jim McCambridge
Marcus Bendtsen
Nadine Karlsson
Ian R White
Preben Bendtsen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:949
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Research Design
Risk-Taking
Student Health Services - methods
Students - psychology
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Treatment Outcome
Universities
Abstract
Alcohol is responsible for a large and growing proportion of the global burden of disease, as well as being the cause of social problems. Brief interventions are one component of comprehensive policy measures necessary to reduce these harms. Brief interventions increasingly take advantage of the Internet to reach large numbers of high risk groups such as students. The research literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly. Although many studies show benefits in the form of reduced consumption, other intervention studies show no effects, for reasons that are unclear. Sweden became the first country in the world to implement a national system in which all university students are offered a brief online intervention via an e-mail.
This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this national system comprising a brief online intervention among university students who are hazardous and harmful drinkers. This study employs a conventional RCT design in which screening to determine eligibility precedes random allocation to immediate or delayed access to online intervention. The online intervention evaluated comprises three main components; assessment, normative feedback and advice on reducing drinking. Screening is confined to a single question in order to minimise assessment reactivity and to prevent contamination. Outcomes will be evaluated after 2 months, with total weekly alcohol consumption being the primary outcome measure. Invitations to participate are provided by e-mail to approximately 55,000 students in 9 Swedish universities.
This RCT evaluates routine service provision in Swedish universities via a delay in offer of intervention to the control group. It evaluates effects in the key population for whom this intervention has been designed. Study findings will inform the further development of the national service provision.
ISRCTN02335307.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24456668 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol email assessment and feedback study dismantling effectiveness for university students (AMADEUS-1): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124868
Source
Trials. 2012;13(1):49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jim McCambridge
Preben Bendtsen
Marcus Bendtsen
Per Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, UK. Jim.McCambridge@lshtm.ac.uk
Source
Trials. 2012;13(1):49
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control - psychology
Deception
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Humans
Patient Selection
Preventive Health Services
Questionnaires
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Risk-Taking
Student Health Services
Students - psychology
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Alcohol causes huge problems for population health and for society, which require interventions with individuals as well as populations to prevent and reduce harms. Brief interventions can be effective and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk groups such as students. The research literature on the effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly and is confronted by methodological challenges common to other areas of e-health including attrition and assessment reactivity and in the design of control conditions.
The study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity, and other possible effects of the research process. Outcomes will be evaluated after 3 months both among student populations as a whole including for a randomized no contact control group and among those who are risky drinkers randomized to brief assessment and feedback (routine practice) or to brief assessment only. A three-arm parallel groups trial will also allow exploration of the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The trial will be undertaken simultaneously in 2 universities randomizing approximately 15,300 students who will all be blinded to trial participation. All participants will be offered routine practice intervention at the end of the study.
This trial informs the development of routine service delivery in Swedish universities and more broadly contributes a new approach to the study of the effectiveness of online interventions in student populations, with relevance to behaviors other than alcohol consumption. The use of blinding and deception in this study raise ethical issues that warrant further attention.
ISRCTN28328154.
Notes
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Jan;61(1):55-6310627097
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(4):e9622100793
Cites: J Dent Educ. 2002 Oct;66(10):1129-3512449206
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Cites: N Engl J Med. 1979 May 31;300(22):1242-5431682
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Mar;88(3):315-358461850
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-8048329970
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Feb 5-11;365(9458):519-3015705462
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 May 9;165(9):986-9515883236
Cites: Prev Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;41(3-4):761-616120456
Cites: Addict Behav. 2006 May;31(5):777-8715996827
Cites: Contemp Clin Trials. 2006 Aug;27(4):305-1916455306
Cites: J Am Coll Health. 2006 Sep-Oct;55(2):83-917017304
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2007 Jan-Feb;42(1):28-3617130139
Cites: Addiction. 2007 Jan;102(1):62-7017207124
Cites: Prev Sci. 2007 Mar;8(1):83-817136461
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Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2008 Mar 10;168(5):530-618332300
Cites: Health Psychol. 2008 Mar;27(2):179-8418377136
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:6918377650
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jul 1;96(1-2):121-718406079
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2008 Nov-Dec;43(6):669-7418693217
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2009 Feb 1;100(1-2):107-1419041196
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jan;28(1):18-2419320671
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2009;11(2):e919403465
Cites: Br J Soc Psychol. 2009 Jun;48(Pt 2):221-3618793492
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 May 28;360(22):2373-4; author reply 2374-519484822
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 May;28(3):301-2319489992
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2223-3319560604
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(3):CD00674819588402
Cites: Addiction. 2009 Aug;104(8):1311-219624324
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:22919594906
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Sep 14;169(16):1508-1419752409
Cites: Addiction. 2009 Nov;104(11):1807-1919744139
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2010 May-Jun;45(3):258-6220150170
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Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2010 Nov;29(6):617-2220973846
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Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(1):e2621371988
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(3):e1474021408060
Cites: Addict Behav. 2011 Jun;36(6):654-921316157
Cites: Addiction. 2011 Oct;106(10):1748-5621518068
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Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Nov;61(6):787-9311188483
PubMed ID
22540638 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of behavioral health compliance and microbial risk factors on student populations within a high-density campus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118921
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(8):584-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jody F Decker
Robin M Slawson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. jdecker@wlu.ca
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(8):584-95
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Female
Hand Hygiene - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - prevention & control - transmission - virology
Male
Microbiological Techniques - methods - statistics & numerical data
Population Density
Residence Characteristics - classification - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Student Health Services - utilization
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this Canadian study was to assess student behavioral response to disease transmission risk, while identifying high microbial deposition/transmission sites.
A student survey was conducted during October 2009.
The methods included a survey of students to assess use of health services, vaccination compliance, and hygiene along with a microbial analysis of potential transmission sites targeting specific residence buildings on campus.
Results indicated that most students maintained that they were worried about H1N1 and reported making changes in hygienic behavior, with the majority not planning to be vaccinated. The microbial analysis indicated contamination of fomites in co-ed residences to be higher than either male or female student residences.
A consideration of physical space along with behavioral factors is required in order to properly assess risk pathways in the establishment of an evidence-based infection control plan for universities and their contiguous communities.
PubMed ID
23157200 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic abuse: the testimony of medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252153
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Jun 21;112(12):1428-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-1975
Author
T L Perry
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Jun 21;112(12):1428-9
Date
Jun-21-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
British Columbia
Clindamycin - therapeutic use
Cloxacillin - therapeutic use
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Erythromycin - therapeutic use
Humans
Neomycin - therapeutic use
Penicillin G - therapeutic use
Penicillin resistance
Penicillin V - therapeutic use
Student Health Services - standards
Students, Medical
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sulfonamides - therapeutic use
Tetracycline - therapeutic use
Abstract
Surveys of the use of antimicrobial drugs on students during antimicrobial drugs on students during their first 15 months in medical or dental school indicate that they have been treated with these agents at least three times as frequently as seems reasonable, and that the tetracyclines, ampicillin, penicillin G and erythromycin are the chief drugs overused. Antimicrobiol therapy is frequently instituted for probable viral respiratory tract infections and without any attempt to establish a bacteriologic diagnosis. It is likely that anitmicrobiol agents are used more widely in treating the general public in Canada than in treating medical students. Improvements in the rational use of this important group of drugs could increase the quality and probably reduced the cost of medical care.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Dec 9;97(24):1445-506061608
Cites: JAMA. 1974 Mar 4;227(9):1023-84405926
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1971 Jun 17;284(24):1361-84930604
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1973 Oct;79(4):555-604795880
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Feb 23;1(7852):3134130492
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1974 Aug;130(2):165-84842338
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1974 Oct 3;291(14):733-44851512
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1972 Aug 10;287(6):261-75038951
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1969 Jun;119(6):662-55795107
PubMed ID
806341 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ask and ye shall plan. A health needs assessment of a university population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190779
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anne Katz
Penny Davis
Shannon Scott Findlay
Author Affiliation
Campus Health Resource Centre, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2. anne_katz@umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):63-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control
Adult
Attitude to Health
Contraception
Health Services Research
Humans
Manitoba
Needs Assessment
Peer Group
Planning Techniques
Safe Sex
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control
Student Health Services - organization & administration
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Abstract
In the development process of establishing a Campus Health Resource Centre, a health needs assessment of 691 students was conducted at the University of Manitoba.
Students were surveyed by their peers to identify the health education needs of this population. The process of the health needs assessment is described and the results have formed the basis for a range of programs and services offered on campus.
Students showed interest in learning about stress management, cold and flu prevention, ergonomics and lifestyle (exercise, nutrition) issues.
Of note is low interest in topics generally thought to be important to students such as contraception, safer sex, and STD/AIDS prevention.
PubMed ID
11925704 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Basic principles and tasks of the problem of "hygiene of children and adolescents"]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44832
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1967;5:25-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1967

Campus physicians' tobacco interventions with university students: a descriptive study of 16 Ontario university clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160156
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Feb;70(2):187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Kelli-an G Lawrance
Sharon A Lawler
Author Affiliation
Brock University, Canada. kelli-an.lawrance@brocku.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Feb;70(2):187-92
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking
Medical Staff - organization & administration - psychology
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Physician's Practice Patterns - organization & administration
Physician's Role - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Self Care
Smoking - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods - psychology
Student Health Services - organization & administration
Students - psychology
Teaching Materials
Universities
Abstract
About one-quarter of Canadian post-secondary students smoke cigarettes. We examined how physicians from Ontario university health clinics intervene with these young adult smokers.
A convenience sample of 16 universities was identified and surveys were hand-delivered to all 228 physicians from these schools. A total of 125 doctors (54.82%) responded; 70 were from universities that were involved in a government-sponsored, coordinated, multi-campus, tobacco control initiative.
Twenty percent of doctors reported asking all or almost all patients about tobacco use; 25.22% asked fewer than half. Describing how they respond to patients identified as smokers, 96.00% of physicians advised cessation, 72.00% offered assistance, and 64.00% arranged for follow-up. Doctors discussed patients' tobacco use with 78.59% of smokers. Nicotine replacement therapies were rarely offered to patients wanting to quit. Doctors from universities involved in the tobacco control initiative were more likely to keep patient education materials in the examining room.
Because most doctors ask only some patients about tobacco use, they may be missing opportunities to provide appropriate advice and assistance to all smokers.
Physician education and support to the clinic are needed to improve the frequency and quality of physician-delivered smoking cessation services to post-secondary students.
PubMed ID
18037601 View in PubMed
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124 records – page 1 of 13.