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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Adolescent health and high school dropout: a prospective cohort study of 9000 Norwegian adolescents (the Young-HUNT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106925
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e74954
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karin A A De Ridder
Kristine Pape
Roar Johnsen
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Steinar Westin
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway ; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Health Trust, Levanger, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e74954
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cluster analysis
Family
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Schools
Student Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
High school dropout is of major concern in the western world. Our aims were to estimate the risk of school dropout in adolescents following chronic somatic disease, somatic symptoms, psychological distress, concentration difficulties, insomnia or overweight and to assess to which extent the family contributes to the association between health and school dropout.
A population of 8950 school-attending adolescents (13-21 years) rated their health in the Young-HUNT 1 Study (90% response rate) in 1995-1997. High school dropout or completion, was defined with the Norwegian National Education Database in the calendar year the participant turned 24 years old. Parental socioeconomic status was defined by using linkages to the National Education Database, the National Insurance Administration and the HUNT2 Survey. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and risk differences of high school dropout, both in the whole population and among siblings within families differentially exposed to health problems.
All explored health dimensions were strongly associated with high school dropout. In models adjusted for parental socioeconomic status, the risk differences of school dropout according to health exposures varied between 3.6% (95% CI 1.7 to 5.5) for having = 1 somatic disease versus none and 11.7% (6.3 to 17.0) for being obese versus normal weight. The results from the analyses comparing differentially exposed siblings, confirmed these results with the exception of weaker associations for somatic diseases and psychological distress. School dropout was strongly clustered within families (family level conditional intraclass correlation 0.42).
Adolescent health problems are markers for high school dropout, independent of parental socioeconomic status. Although school dropout it strongly related to family-level factors, also siblings with poor health have reduced opportunity to complete high school compared to healthy siblings. Public health policy should focus on ensuring young people with poor health the best attainable education.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24086408 View in PubMed
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Adolescent school absenteeism and service use in a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269789
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:626
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kristin Gärtner Askeland
Siren Haugland
Kjell Morten Stormark
Tormod Bøe
Mari Hysing
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:626
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Norway
Peer Group
Risk-Taking
Student Dropouts
Students - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
School absenteeism is linked to a range of health concerns, health risk behaviors and school dropout. It is therefore important to evaluate the extent to which adolescents with absenteeism are in contact with health care and other services. The aim of the current study was to investigate service use of Norwegian adolescents with moderate and high absenteeism in comparison to students with lower rates of absence.
The study employs data from a population-based study from 2012 targeting all pupils in upper secondary education in Hordaland County, Norway (the youth@hordaland-survey). A total of 8988 adolescents between the ages of 16 and 18 were included in the present study. Information on service use was based on adolescent self-report data collected in the youth@hordaland-survey. Absence data was collected using administrative data provided by the Hordaland County Council.
High absence (defined as being absent 15% or more the past semester) was found among 10.1% of the adolescents. Compared to their peers with low absence (less than 3% absence the past semester), adolescents with high absence were more likely to be in contact with all the services studied, including mental health services (odds ratio (OR) 3.96), adolescent health clinics (OR 2.11) and their general practitioner (GP) (OR 1.94). Frequency of contact was higher among adolescents with moderate and high absence and there seems to be a gradient of service use corresponding to the level of absence. Still, 40% of the adolescents with high absence had not been in contact with any services.
Adolescents with high absence had increased use of services, although a group of youth at risk seems to be without such contact. This finding suggests a potential to address school absenteeism through systematic collaboration between schools and health personnel.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26155938 View in PubMed
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Assessment and evaluation of individual prerequisites for dental education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178055
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2004 Nov;8(4):152-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
U. Heintze
K. Radeborg
H. Bengtsson
A. Stenlåås
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Technology, Faculty of Odontology, University of Malmö, Malmö, Sweden. ulf.heintze@telia.com
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2004 Nov;8(4):152-60
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Age Factors
College Admission Test
Education, Dental - standards
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Predictive value of tests
Psychological Tests
School Admission Criteria
Student Dropouts
Sweden
Abstract
Since 2001 the School of Dentistry of Malmo University in Sweden has used an alternative admissions procedure based on results of an investigation supported by the Swedish Council for the Renewal of Undergraduate Education. The investigation concerned possibilities of predicting dental school performance on the basis of an interview, as well as tests of general intelligence, spatial ability, manual dexterity, empathy and social competence. Two groups of incoming students were followed from start to completion of their training. Significant relationships were found between (i) number of course examinations failed and poor results on interviews, as well as low scores on intelligence, spatial ability, and a test of spatial-manual ability, (ii) good results in a pre-clinical course in cavity preparation and high scores on spatial ability, (iii) assessments of high social competence during training and good results on interviews, as well as high scores on empathy and non-verbal intelligence. Dropout from the study programme could not be predicted, possibly due to the varying reasons for it.
PubMed ID
15469441 View in PubMed
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Association of pupil vandalism, bullying and truancy with teachers' absence due to illness: a multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123851
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2012 Jun;50(3):347-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jenni Ervasti
Mika Kivimäki
Riikka Puusniekka
Pauliina Luopa
Jaana Pentti
Sakari Suominen
Jussi Vahtera
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jenni.ervasti@ttl.fi
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2012 Jun;50(3):347-61
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Bullying
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Faculty - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Student Dropouts
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine whether vandalism, bullying, and truancy among pupils at school are associated with absence due to illness among teachers. Data on such problem behaviour of 17,033 pupils in 90 schools were linked to absence records of 2364 teachers. Pupil reported vandalism and bullying at the school-level were associated with teachers' short-term (1- to 3-day) absences. Cumulative exposure to various forms of pupils' problem behaviour was associated with even higher rates of short-term absences among teachers. No association was found between pupils' problem behaviour and teachers' long-term (>3-day) absences. In conclusion, there seems to be a link between pupils' problem behaviour and teachers' short-term absence due to illness. Further work should determine whether problem behaviour is a cause or a consequence of absences or whether the association is noncausal.
PubMed ID
22656077 View in PubMed
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Balance across contexts: importance of balanced need satisfaction across various life domains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149753
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2009 Aug;35(8):1031-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Marina Milyavskaya
Isabelle Gingras
Geneviève A Mageau
Richard Koestner
Hugo Gagnon
Jianqun Fang
Julie Boiché
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. marina.milyavskaya@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2009 Aug;35(8):1031-45
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
California
Child
China
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depression - psychology
Female
France
Friends - psychology
Humans
Individuality
Intention
Internal-External Control
Job Satisfaction
Male
Personal Autonomy
Personality Assessment
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Self Efficacy
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Social Identification
Student Dropouts - psychology
Abstract
Self-determination theory posits that satisfaction of three basic psychological needs-autonomy, competence, and relatedness-are required for psychological well-being, and a recent study showed that the balance in the satisfaction of these three needs independently affects well-being. The present investigation builds on these findings by examining the balance of adolescents' need satisfaction across distinct life contexts. The results of three studies show that adolescents who experience a balance of need satisfaction across important life contexts, including at school, at home, with friends, and in part-time jobs, reported higher well-being and better school adjustment. This finding emerged consistently across four countries and across multiple measures of school adjustment, including teacher reports. Together, these results support previous research that highlights the importance of consistency for psychological functioning.
PubMed ID
19592677 View in PubMed
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Career escalation training. Five-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251790
Source
Am J Public Health. 1975 Nov;65(11):1208-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1975
Author
E A Sainer
P. Ruiz
J F Wilder
Source
Am J Public Health. 1975 Nov;65(11):1208-11
Date
Nov-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
African Americans
Career Mobility
Community Health Workers - education
Community Mental Health Services
Curriculum
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
New York City
Puerto Rico - ethnology
Role
Student Dropouts
Universities
Abstract
A study has been reported on 5 years of experience in a community mental health center with a career escalation training program for indigenous workers in a ghetto community. More than one-half entered the program during the 5-year period and about one-third had either achieved a degree or were still active in the Program at the time of this study. Although it is too early to assess the full impact of the program on career advancement, the authors believe that at least a master's degree is required for true upward and lateral mobility. The most striking finding was the high retention rate in the mental health field of those workers who entered the program in contrast to those who didn't. A number of suggestions have been made to improve the effectiveness of a career escalation training program. It is too early to tell whether the long term benefits for individuals, the Center, and the mental health field at large justify the cost and the continuation of such educational release time programs.
Notes
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1968 Oct;19(4):404-125672796
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1970 Apr;126(10):1473-95434630
PubMed ID
1180367 View in PubMed
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Causes and outcomes of discontinued dental studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217164
Source
J Dent Educ. 1994 Oct;58(10):771-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994

67 records – page 1 of 7.