Skip header and navigation

1 records – page 1 of 1.

Does the cortical bone resorption rate change due to 90Sr-radiation exposure? Analysis of data from Techa Riverside residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134955
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2011 Aug;50(3):417-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Evgenia I Tolstykh
Natalia B Shagina
Marina O Degteva
Lynn R Anspaugh
Bruce A Napier
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Vorovskogo 68a, 454076, Chelyabinsk, Russian Federation. evgenia@urcrm.ru
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2011 Aug;50(3):417-30
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bone Marrow - radiation effects
Bone Resorption - blood - etiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Hazard Release
Rivers
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - adverse effects - blood
Abstract
The Mayak Production Association released large amounts of (90)Sr into the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) with peak amounts in 1950-1951. Techa Riverside residents ingested an average of about 3,000 kBq of (90)Sr. The (90)Sr-body burden of approximately 15,000 individuals has been measured in the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine in 1974-1997 with use of a special whole-body counter (WBC). Strontium-90 had mainly deposited in the cortical part of the skeleton by 25 years following intake, and (90)Sr elimination occurs as a result of cortical bone resorption. The effect of (90)Sr-radiation exposure on the rate of cortical bone resorption was studied. Data on 2,022 WBC measurements were selected for 207 adult persons, who were measured three or more times before they were 50-55 years old. The individual-resorption rates were calculated with the rate of strontium recirculation evaluated as 0.0018 year(-1). Individual absorbed doses in red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface (BS) were also calculated. Statistically significant negative relationships of cortical bone resorption rate were discovered related to (90)Sr-body burden and dose absorbed in the RBM or the BS. The response appears to have a threshold of about 1.5-Gy RBM dose. The radiation-induced decrease in bone resorption rate may not be significant in terms of health. However, a decrease in bone remodeling rate can be among several causes of an increased level of degenerative dystrophic bone pathology in exposed persons.
PubMed ID
21523463 View in PubMed
Less detail