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All-cause mortality and cardiovascular effects associated with the DPP-IV inhibitor sitagliptin compared with metformin, a retrospective cohort study on the Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258352
Source
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2014 Mar;16(3):231-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
N M Scheller
U M Mogensen
C. Andersson
A. Vaag
C. Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health, Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2014 Mar;16(3):231-6
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Diabetic Angiopathies - blood - mortality
Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Metformin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Pyrazines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - blood - mortality
Treatment Outcome
Triazoles - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
We performed a retrospective cohort study, investigating the clinical outcomes including mortality and cardiovascular disease of sitagliptin compared with metformin monotherapies.
All patients receiving monotherapy with the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors (DPP-IV) inhibitor sitagliptin between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2011 were identified. All-cause mortality and a composite endpoint of stroke, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and all-cause mortality associated with sitagliptin monotherapy were compared with metformin monotherapy. In addition, as an indicator of efficacy we analysed the hazard ratio of changing treatment.
A total of 84?756 patients were included in the analysis, 1228 (1.4%) received sitagliptin monotherapy whereas the remaining 83?528 (98.6%) patients received metformin monotherapy. Patients using metformin were younger than patients using sitagliptin (59.0?±?15.2 vs. 62.5?±?13.1) were less often male (51.6 vs. 54.2%) and had longer treatment duration with monotherapy (1.8?±?1.3 vs. 0.9?±?1.1?years). Compared with patients receiving metformin, patients using sitagliptin showed no statistically significant excess risks of all-cause mortality [hazard ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-1.71; p?=?0.153] or the composite endpoint (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.92-1.61; p?=?0.164). However, the use of sitagliptin monotherapy was associated with an increased likelihood of changing treatment (hazard ratio, 4.88; 95% CI, 4.46-5.35; p?
PubMed ID
24020750 View in PubMed
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Association Between Levels of Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I and Functional Recovery, Mortality, and Recurrent Stroke at a 7-year Follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309401
Source
Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 2020 May; 128(5):303-310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2020
Author
N David Åberg
Daniel Åberg
Cecilia Lagging
Lukas Holmegaard
Petra Redfors
Katarina Jood
Michael Nilsson
Maria Åberg
Christian Blomstrand
Johan Svensson
Christina Jern
Jörgen Isgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 2020 May; 128(5):303-310
Date
May-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Ischemic Stroke - blood - mortality - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Recovery of Function - physiology
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The association of serum insulin-like growth factor I (s-IGF-I) with favorable outcome after ischemic stroke (IS) beyond 2 years is unknown. We investigated whether the levels of s-IGF-I 3 months post-stroke were associated with functional recovery up to 7 years after IS, considering also mortality and recurrent strokes.
Patients (N=324; 65% males; mean age, 55 years) with s-IGF-I levels assessed 3 months after the index IS were included from the Sahlgrenska Academy Study on Ischemic Stroke (SAHLSIS). The modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to evaluate outcomes at 3 months, 2 and 7 years after IS, and recovery was defined as an improvement, no change, or deterioration in the shifts of mRS score. Baseline stroke severity was determined using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS).
The mRS score distributions were better in the above-median s-IGF-I group (>146.7?ng/ml). The s-IGF-I level was not associated with recurrent stroke (N=79) or death (N=44), although it correlated with recovery (r=0.12, P=0.035). In the regression analysis, s-IGF-I associated with recovery between 3 months and 7 years (but not between 2 and 7 years). The associations did not withstand adjustment for age and sex. For comparison, the corresponding associations between 3 months and 2 years withstood all adjustments.
The association for s-IGF-I with long-term post-stroke recovery persists after 7 years, which is also reflected in the mRS score distributions at all time-points. The effects are however modest, and not driven by mortality or recurrent stroke.
PubMed ID
31261410 View in PubMed
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Long-term effects of inflammation-sensitive plasma proteins and systolic blood pressure on incidence of stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187476
Source
Stroke. 2002 Dec;33(12):2744-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
G. Engström
P. Lind
B. Hedblad
L. Stavenow
L. Janzon
F. Lindgärde
Author Affiliation
Departments of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Gunnar.Engstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Stroke. 2002 Dec;33(12):2744-9
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Proteins - analysis
Ceruloplasmin - analysis
Comorbidity
Diastole
Fibrinogen - analysis
Follow-Up Studies
Haptoglobins - analysis
Humans
Hypertension - blood - mortality
Incidence
Inflammation - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Orosomucoid - analysis
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Time
alpha 1-Antitrypsin - analysis
Abstract
The present study investigated the relationships between inflammation-sensitive plasma proteins (ISPs) and systolic blood pressure (SBP), as well as the joint long-term effects of ISP and SBP on incidence of stroke.
BP and 5 ISPs (fibrinogen, alpha1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, orosomucoid) were assessed in 6071 healthy men 28 to 61 years of age. All-cause mortality and incidence of stroke were monitored over a mean follow-up of 18.7 years in men defined by SBP (/=140 mm Hg) and ISP (0 to 1 or 2 to 5 ISPs in the top quartile).
SBP and diastolic BP were significantly and positively associated with the number of ISPs in the top quartile. As expected, elevated SBP was associated with an increased incidence of stroke. Among men with SBP >/=140 mm Hg, there were, however, significant differences between those with high and low ISP levels. After risk factor adjustment, men with SBP >/=140 mm Hg and high ISP levels had a relative risk of stroke of 4.3 (95% CI, 2.3 to 7.8) compared with men with SBP /=140 was 2.5 (95% CI,1.4 to 4.6). Men with high ISP levels had a significantly increased risk of stroke also after exclusion of the events from the first 10 years of follow-up.
High ISP levels are associated with elevated BP. These proteins are associated with an increased risk of stroke among men with high BP and provide information on stroke risk even after many years of follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2003 Apr;34(4):83912663870
Comment In: Stroke. 2002 Dec;33(12):2732-312468759
PubMed ID
12468764 View in PubMed
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Mercury in serum predicts low risk of death and myocardial infarction in Gothenburg women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126836
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jan;86(1):71-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Margareta Ahlqwist
Lars Barregard
Cecilia Björkelund
Ann Blomstrand
Staffan Skerfving
Valter Sundh
Maria Wennberg
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, SE 90185 Umeå, Sweden. Ingvar.Bergdahl@envmed.umu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jan;86(1):71-7
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mercury - blood
Myocardial Infarction - blood - mortality
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Markers of mercury (Hg) exposure have shown both positive and negative associations with cardiovascular disease (CVD). We assessed the association between serum Hg (S-Hg) and risk of cardiovascular disease in a prospective population-based cohort, with attention to the roles of dental health and fish consumption.
Total mortality, as well as morbidity and mortality from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke, was followed up for 32 years in 1,391 women (initially age 38-60), in relation to S-Hg at baseline, using Cox regression models. Potential confounders (age, socioeconomic status, serum lipids, alcohol consumption, dental health, smoking, hypertension, waist-hip ratio, and diabetes) and other covariates (e.g., fish consumption) were also considered.
Hazard ratios (HR) adjusted only for age showed strong inverse associations between baseline S-Hg and total mortality [highest quartile: hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.59-0.97], incident AMI (HR 0.56; CI 0.34-0.93), and fatal AMI (HR 0.31; CI 0.15-0.66). Adjustment for potential confounding factors, especially dental health, had a strong impact on the risk estimates, and after adjustment, only the reduced risk of fatal AMI remained statistically significant.
There was a strong inverse association between Hg exposure and CVD. Likely, reasons are confounding with good dental health (also correlated with the number of amalgam fillings in these age groups) and/or fish consumption. The results suggest potential effects of dental health and/or fish consumption on CVD that deserve attention in preventive medicine.
PubMed ID
22350276 View in PubMed
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A Reverse J-Shaped Association Between Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: The CopD Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265907
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Jun;100(6):2339-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Darshana Durup
Henrik Løvendahl Jørgensen
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Jytte Halkjær
Bent Lind
Anne-Marie Heegaard
Peter Schwarz
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Jun;100(6):2339-46
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - mortality
Stroke - blood - mortality
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in the Western world, but the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality remains unclear.
The objective of the study was to determine the association between cardiovascular, stroke, and acute myocardial infarct mortality and serum levels of 25(OH)D.
This was an observational cohort study, the Copenhagen vitamin D study, data from a single laboratory center in Copenhagen, Denmark. Follow-up was from 2004 to 2011.
Serum 25(OH)D was analyzed from 247 574 subjects from the Copenhagen general practice sector.
Examination of the association 25(OH)D levels and mortality from cardiovascular disease, stroke, and acute myocardial infarct was performed among 161 428 women and 86 146 men.
A multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to compute hazard ratios for cardiovascular, stroke, and acute myocardial infarct mortality.
Of 247 574 subjects, a total of 16 645 subjects died in the ensuing 0-7 years. A total of 5454 died from cardiovascular disease including 1574 from stroke and 702 from acute myocardial infarct. The 25(OH)D level of 70 nmol/L was associated with the lowest cardiovascular disease mortality risk. Compared with that level, the hazard ratio for cardiovascular disease mortality was 2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8-2.1] at the lower extreme (~ 12.5 nmol/L) with a higher risk for men [2.5 (95% CI 2.2-2.9)] than for women [1.7 (95% CI 1.5-1.9)]. At the higher extreme (~ 125 nmol/L), the hazard ratio of cardiovascular disease mortality was 1.3 (95% CI 1.2-1.4), with a similar risk among men and women. Results were similar for stroke and acute myocardial subgroups.
In this large observational study, low and high levels of 25(OH)D were associated with cardiovascular disease, stroke, and acute myocardial mortality in a nonlinear, reverse J-shaped manner, with the highest risk at lower levels. Whether this was a causal or associational finding cannot be determined from our data. There is a need for randomized clinical trials that include information on the effects of 25(OH)D levels greater than 100 nmol/L.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Jun;100(6):L5126047083
Comment In: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Jun;100(6):L49-5026047082
PubMed ID
25710567 View in PubMed
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Serum Potassium Is Positively Associated With Stroke and Mortality in the Large, Population-Based Malmö Preventive Project Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286660
Source
Stroke. 2017 Nov;48(11):2973-2978
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Linda S Johnson
Nick Mattsson
Ahmad Sajadieh
Per Wollmer
Martin Söderholm
Source
Stroke. 2017 Nov;48(11):2973-2978
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Brain Ischemia - blood - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Potassium - blood
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Low serum potassium is associated with stroke in populations with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus but has not been studied in a mainly healthy population. We aimed to study the relation between serum potassium and incident stroke and mortality in the Malmö Preventive Project, a large cohort with screening in early mid-life and follow-up >25 years.
Serum potassium measurements and covariates were available in 21?353 individuals (79% men, mean age 44 years). Mean follow-up time was 26.9 years for stroke analyses and 29.3 years for mortality analyses. There were 2061 incident stroke events and 8709 deaths. Cox regression analyses adjusted for multiple stroke risk factors (age, sex, height, weight, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, serum sodium, current smoking, prevalent diabetes mellitus, prevalent coronary artery disease, and treatment for hypertension) were fitted.
There was an independent, linear association between serum potassium, per mmol/L increase, and both stroke (hazard ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.52; P
PubMed ID
28974633 View in PubMed
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Short and long term association of a single serum cholesterol measurement in middle-aged men in prediction of fatal coronary and other cardiovascular events: a cross-cultural comparison through Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173212
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(7):597-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Alessandro Menotti
Mariapaola Lanti
Daan Kromhout
Anthony Kafatos
Srecko Nedeljkovic
Aulikki Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Association for Cardiac Research, Associazione per la Ricerca Cardiologica, Rome, Italy. menottia@tin.it
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(7):597-604
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - mortality
Cause of Death
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - blood - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Greece - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Netherlands - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Stroke - blood - mortality
Yugoslavia - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose was to study the association of a single serum cholesterol measurement with early and late coronary and other cardiovascular deaths during 35 years of follow-up in samples of men aged 40-59 years in five European countries.
A single serum total cholesterol measurement was considered in samples from Finland (N = 1563), the Netherlands (N = 811), Italy (N = 1642), Serbia (N = 1537) and Greece (N = 1158) (total = 6711). Seven partitioned proportional hazards models were solved, one for each of seven independent 5-year blocks, to predict coronary, stroke, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality risk. Partitioned hazard scores were cumulated. The resulting curves showed a relatively constant strength in risk for coronary deaths as a function of baseline serum cholesterol levels, although a strong relationship during the first 10-year period was followed by a weaker relationship later on. The pooled estimates for the five countries gave a relative risk for 1 mmol/l of serum cholesterol (95% confidence intervals) of 1.44 (1.23-1.68) for the first period; 1.52 (1.31-1.76) for the second period; and 1.16 (1.02-1.32) for the third period; 1.18 (1.05-1.32) for the forth period; 1.17 (1.05-1.31) for the fifth period; 1.22 (1.10-1.35) for the sixth period; 1.18 (1.05-1.32) for the seventh 5-year period of follow-up. No significant relationship were found between serum cholesterol and stroke and all-cause mortality, while intermediate findings were obtained for cardiovascular diseases.
A single serum cholesterol measurement in middle aged-men maintains a strong relationship with the occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD) deaths during 35 years of follow-up.
PubMed ID
16119433 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.