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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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Development of coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke in relation to fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose levels in the normal range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123128
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Feng Ning
Lei Zhang
Jacqueline M Dekker
Altan Onat
Coen D A Stehouwer
John S Yudkin
Tiina Laatikainen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Kalevi Pyörälä
Qing Qiao
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Hjelt Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. feng.ning@helsinki.fi
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:76
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Brain Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Fasting - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Individuals who had normoglycemia but whose 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) concentrations did not return to the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) have been shown to have increased cardiovascular mortality. This is further investigated regarding to the first events of coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke (IS).
Data from 9 Finnish and Swedish cohorts comprising 3743 men and 3916 women aged 25 to 90 ?years who had FPG??FPG (Group II) compared with those having 2hPG = FPG (Group I).
A total of 466 (115) CHD and 235 (106) IS events occurred in men (women) during a median follow-up of 16.4?years. Individuals in Group II were older and had greater body mass index, blood pressure, 2hPG and fasting insulin than those in Group I in both sexes. Multivariate adjusted HRs (95% confidence intervals) for incidence of CHD, IS, and composite CVD events (CHD?+?IS) in men were 1.13 (0.93-1.37), 1.40 (1.06-1.85) and 1.20 (1.01-1.42) in the Group II as compared with those in the Group I. The corresponding HRs in women were 1.33 (0.83-2.13), 0.94 (0.59-1.51) and 1.11 (0.79-1.54), respectively.
Within normoglycemic range individuals whose 2hPG did not return to their FPG levels during an OGTT had increased risk of CHD and IS.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22731255 View in PubMed
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Elevated Troponin Levels in Acute Stroke Patients Predict Long-term Mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274472
Source
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2015 Oct;24(10):2390-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Charlotte Thålin
Ann-Sofie Rudberg
Fredrik Johansson
Fredrik Jonsson
Ann Charlotte Laska
Anders T Nygren
Magnus von Arbin
Håkan Wallén
Sara Aspberg
Source
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2015 Oct;24(10):2390-6
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Troponin - blood
Abstract
Elevated plasma levels of troponin in acute stroke patients are common and have in several studies been shown to predict in-hospital and short-term mortality. Little is, however, known about the long-term prognosis of these patients. The aim of this study was to determine patient characteristics and 5-year mortality in patients with acute stroke and troponin elevation on admission.
A retrospective cohort study of all consecutive patients with acute stroke and a plasma troponin I (TnI) analyzed on admission to Danderyd Hospital between January 1, 2005, and January 1, 2006 (n = 247). Patient characteristics were obtained from the Swedish National Stroke Register, Riksstroke, as well as hospital records. Mortality data were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register.
There were 133 patients (54%) with TnI less than .03 µg/L (normal), 74 patients (30%) with TnI .03-.11 µg/L (low elevation), and 40 patients (16%) with TnI greater than .11 µg/L (high elevation). TnI elevations were associated with a higher age, prior ischemic stroke, chronic heart failure, renal insufficiency, stroke severity, and ST segment elevation or depression on admission. The rate of hyperlipidemia decreased with increasing TnI. Adjusted for age and comorbidity, elevated TnI values on admission had a significantly and sustained increased mortality over the 5-year follow-up, with a hazard ratio of 1.90 (95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.70).
Troponin elevation in patients with acute stroke, even when adjusted for several possible confounders, is associated with an almost 2-fold increased risk of 5-year mortality.
PubMed ID
26236002 View in PubMed
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Insulin sensitivity measured by the euglycaemic insulin clamp and proinsulin levels as predictors of stroke in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91522
Source
Diabetologia. 2009 Jan;52(1):90-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Wiberg B.
Sundström J.
Zethelius B.
Lind L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden. bernice.wiberg@akademiska.se
Source
Diabetologia. 2009 Jan;52(1):90-6
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Clamp Technique - methods
Humans
Insulin - administration & dosage - metabolism
Insulin Resistance
Ischemic Attack, Transient - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Proinsulin - blood
Questionnaires
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Our aim was to investigate the predictive power of a panel of variables in glucose and insulin metabolism for the incidence of stroke or transient ischaemic attacks (TIA). We hypothesised that proinsulin and insulin resistance contributes to an increase of risk for fatal and non-fatal stroke/TIA, independently of diabetes and established risk factors. METHODS: The study is based on the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort. The examinations were performed at age 70 years. RESULTS: In 1,151 men free from stroke at baseline, 150 developed stroke or TIA during a median follow-up of 8.8 years. In unadjusted Cox proportional hazards analyses, a 1 SD increase of a predictor variable was associated with an increased risk for stroke/TIA, e.g. plasma insulin (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.01-1.40), fasting intact proinsulin (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.09-1.49); whereas a 1 SD increase in insulin sensitivity measured by the euglycaemic insulin clamp method decreased the risk for stroke/TIA (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.96). The predictive values of fasting intact proinsulin and insulin sensitivity endured but not that of plasma insulin when adjusting for diabetes. In models adjusting for diabetes, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy, serum cholesterol and smoking, proinsulin remained as a significant predictor of later stroke/TIA (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.48) whereas clamp insulin sensitivity did not (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.71-1.07). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Fasting intact proinsulin level and insulin sensitivity at clamp predicted subsequent fatal and non-fatal stroke/TIA, independently of diabetes in elderly men whereas fasting insulin did not.
PubMed ID
18949454 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D status and incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality: a general population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120335
Source
Endocrine. 2013 Jun;43(3):618-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Tea Skaaby
Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen
Charlotta Pisinger
Torben Jørgensen
Betina Heinsbæk Thuesen
Mogens Fenger
Allan Linneberg
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup Hospital, Nordre Ringvej 57, 2600, Glostrup, Denmark. tea.skaaby.01@regionh.dk
Source
Endocrine. 2013 Jun;43(3):618-25
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Low vitamin D status has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality primarily in selected groups, smaller studies, or with self-reported vitamin D intake. We investigated the association of serum vitamin D status with the incidence of a registry-based diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, and all-cause mortality in a large sample of the general population. A total of 9,146 individuals from the two population-based studies, Monica10 and Inter99, were included. Measurements of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D at baseline were carried out using the IDS ISYS immunoassay system in Monica10 and High-performance liquid chromatography in Inter99. Information on CVDs and causes of death was obtained from Danish registries until 31 December 2008. There were 478 cases of IHD, 316 cases of stroke, and 633 deaths during follow-up (mean follow-up 10 years). Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis showed a significant association between vitamin D status and all-cause mortality with a HR = 0.95 (P = 0.005) per 10 nmol/l higher vitamin D level. We found no association between vitamin D status and incidence of IHD or stroke (HR = 1.01, P = 0.442 and HR = 1.00, P = 0.920, respectively). In this large general population study, the observed inverse association between serum vitamin D status and all-cause mortality was not explained by a similar inverse association with IHD or stroke.
PubMed ID
23015273 View in PubMed
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