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Active multimodal psychotherapy in children and adolescents with suicidality: description, evaluation and clinical profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92095
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Högberg Goran
Hällström Tore
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. gor.hogberg@gmail.com
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Desensitization, Psychologic - methods
Eye Movements - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychodrama - methods
Psychotherapy - methods
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the clinical pattern of 14 youths with presenting suicidality, to describe an integrative treatment approach, and to estimate therapy effectiveness. Fourteen patients aged 10 to 18 years from a child and adolescent outpatient clinic in Stockholm were followed in a case series. The patients were treated with active multimodal psychotherapy. This consisted of mood charting by mood-maps, psycho-education, wellbeing practice and trauma resolution. Active techniques were psychodrama and body-mind focused techniques including eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. The patients were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment and at 22 months post treatment with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. The clinical pattern of the group was observed. After treatment there was a significant change towards normality in the Global Assessment of Functioning scale both immediately post-treatment and at 22 months. A clinical pattern, post trauma suicidal reaction, was observed with a combination of suicidality, insomnia, bodily symptoms and disturbed mood regulation. We conclude that in the post trauma reaction suicidality might be a presenting symptom in young people. Despite the shortcomings of a case series the results of this study suggest that a mood-map-based multimodal treatment approach with active techniques might be of value in the treatment of children and youth with suicidality.
PubMed ID
18783125 View in PubMed
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Acute posttraumatic stress symptoms and depression after exposure to the 2005 Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show disaster: prevalence and predictors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157097
Source
Am J Disaster Med. 2007 Sep-Oct;2(5):217-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Steven Taylor
Gordon J G Asmundson
R Nicholas Carleton
Peter Brundin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Disaster Med. 2007 Sep-Oct;2(5):217-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - psychology
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Disasters
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Saskatchewan
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute distress-that is, clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and depression-and to identify predictors of each in a sample of people who witnessed a fatal aircraft collision at the 2005 Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show.
Air Show attendees (N = 157) were recruited by advertisements in the local media and completed an Internet-administered battery of questionnaires.
Based on previously established cut-offs, 22 percent respondents had clinically significant PTSS and 24 percent had clinically significant depressive symptoms. Clinically significant symptoms were associated with posttrauma impairment in social and occupational functioning. Acute distress was associated with several variables, including aspects of Air Show trauma exposure, severity of prior trauma exposure, low posttrauma social support (ie, negative responses by others), indices of poor coping (eg, intolerance of uncertainty, rumination about the trauma), and elevated scores on anxiety sensitivity, the personality trait of absorption, and dissociative tendencies.
Results suggest that clinically significant acute distress is common in the aftermath of witnessed trauma. The statistical predictors (correlates) of acute distress were generally consistent with the results of studies of other forms of trauma. People with elevated scores on theoretical vulnerability factors (eg, elevated anxiety sensitivity) were particularly likely to develop acute distress.
PubMed ID
18491838 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption in the aftermath of a natural disaster: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274815
Source
Public Health. 2016 Mar;132:33-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
A. Nordløkken
H. Pape
T. Heir
Source
Public Health. 2016 Mar;132:33-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Asia, Southeastern
Disasters
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tsunamis
Abstract
In this study, we examined changes in alcohol consumption in the aftermath of a natural disaster, as well as possible predictors of both increased and decreased drinking.
Observational longitudinal study.
Repatriated Norwegian adults who resided in areas affected by the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami completed a questionnaire at 6 and 24 months postdisaster (N = 649).
Weekly alcohol consumption and frequency of intoxication did not change significantly from 6 to 24 months postdisaster at the population level: 18.3% (n = 116) increased their alcohol consumption while 21.1% (n = 125) showed a reduction. Increased drinking was not predicted by severity of disaster exposure, post-traumatic stress, or measures of psychological functioning. Reduced alcohol consumption was predicted by younger age and social withdrawal, but not by any of the other study variables.
Our findings indicate that the tsunami experience had only minor effects on alcohol consumption, in contrast to some studies suggesting a relationship between trauma exposure and increased alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
26715315 View in PubMed
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Alleged sexual abuse at a day care center: impact on parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30753
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2003 Aug;27(8):939-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Grete Dyb
Are Holen
Alan M Steinberg
Ned Rodriguez
Robert S Pynoos
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, MTFS, NO-7489 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2003 Aug;27(8):939-50
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Abuse, Sexual - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Day Care Centers - legislation & jurisprudence
Child, Preschool
Deception
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Life Change Events
Male
Norway
Parents - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Self Disclosure
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - etiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This report describes the cascade of stressful events and secondary life changes experienced by parents in a case of alleged sexual abuse at a day care program. The study evaluated parents' Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms and general psychological responses to the stressful events 4 years after the alleged abuse, and explored predictive factors of parental distress. METHODS: A total of 39 parents were interviewed about stressful events, life changes, and social support. Current distress reactions, psychological wellbeing, and locus of control were assessed with a battery of standardized measures. RESULTS: Hearing about the sexual abuse, testifying in court, hearing the verdict, and being exposed in media reports were all rated by the parents as distressing events. The majority of the parents experienced secondary life changes after the alleged sexual abuse. Four years after the alleged sexual abuse, one-third of the parents reported a high level of PTSD Intrusive symptoms and one-fourth reported a high level of PTSD Avoidance symptoms. There was a significant positive correlation between a measure of psychological wellbeing and PTSD. Secondary life changes and locus of control significantly predicted PTSD. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that the alleged sexual abuse of children in day care and the resulting events in the legal system and the media constitute significant and chronic stressors in the lives of the children's parents. These findings underscore the need to expand the focus of trauma-related sequelae from the child victim to their parents and family.
PubMed ID
12951142 View in PubMed
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The association between alcohol, medicinal drug use and post-traumatic stress symptoms among Norwegian rescue workers after the 22 July twin terror attacks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284647
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2016 Sep;28:29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Stig Tore Bogstrand
Laila Skogstad
Øivind Ekeberg
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2016 Sep;28:29-33
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - etiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Rescue Work - manpower
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - complications - etiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Terrorism - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess whether the use of alcohol and medicinal drugs among rescue workers as a consequence of the 22 July terrorist attack was associated with post-traumatic stress symptoms, and explore if there were differences between affiliated and unaffiliated rescue workers.
Ten months after the bombing in the Oslo government district and the shooting at the youth camp on Ut?ya Island, a cross-sectional study of 1790 rescue and healthcare workers was conducted. The questionnaire included information on medicinal drug and alcohol use, experiences during rescue work and PTSS.
Few rescue workers reported alcohol (6.8% n?=?119) or medicinal drug (5.5% n?=?95) use as a consequence of participation in the 22 July terror attacks. Alcohol and medicinal drug use was associated with an elevated level of PTSS among the rescue workers who reported to use medicinal drugs (11.1 95% CI: 5.7-21.8) or alcohol (10.0 95% CI: 5.2-19.0) as a consequence of the terror attacks.
The study found a low level of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and alcohol and medicinal drug use among the rescue workers after the terror attacks in Norway on 22 July 2011. There was a strong association between both medicinal drug and alcohol use and elevated PTSS.
PubMed ID
27068750 View in PubMed
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Association of trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, and experimental pain response in healthy young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118653
Source
Clin J Pain. 2013 May;29(5):425-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lydia Gómez-Pérez
Alicia E López-Martínez
Author Affiliation
Anxiety and Illness Behaviours Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada. lydia.gomez.perez@uregina.ca
Source
Clin J Pain. 2013 May;29(5):425-34
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Pain Measurement - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pain Perception
Pain Threshold - psychology
Prevalence
Reference Values
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Evidence of pain alterations in trauma-exposed individuals has been found. The presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be explaining these alterations, as some of the psychological characteristics of PTSD are hypothesized to increase pain response.
To examine differences in pain response and in certain psychological variables between trauma-exposed women (TEW) with PTSD, TEW without PTSD, and non-trauma-exposed women (NTEW) and to explore the role of these psychological variables in the differences in pain response between the groups.
A total of 122 female students completed a cold pressor task (42 TEW with PTSD, 40 TEW without PTSD, and 40 NTEW). Anxiety sensitivity, experiential avoidance, trait and state dissociation, depressive symptoms, state anxiety, catastrophizing, and arousal were assessed.
TEW with PTSD reported significantly higher pain unpleasantness than NTEW, but not more than that of TEW without PTSD. They also presented higher trait dissociation, state anxiety, depressive symptoms, and skin conductance than the other 2 groups and higher anxiety sensitivity than TEW without PTSD. TEW without PTSD reported more pain unpleasantness than NTEW, but they recovered faster from pain. However, these differences were not explained by any psychological variable.
The results suggest that although trauma-exposed individuals are not more sensitive to painful stimulation, they evaluate pain in a more negative way. Exposure to trauma itself, but not to PTSD, may explain the differences found in pain unpleasantness.
PubMed ID
23183263 View in PubMed
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Asylum seekers in Denmark--a study of health status and grade of traumatization of newly arrived asylum seekers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93810
Source
Torture. 2008;18(2):77-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Masmas Tania Nicole
Møller Eva
Buhmannr Caecilie
Bunch Vibeke
Jensen Jean Hald
Hansen Trine Nørregård
Jørgensen Louise Møller
Kjaer Claes
Mannstaedt Maiken
Oxholm Annemette
Skau Jutta
Theilade Lotte
Worm Lise
Ekstrøm Morten
Author Affiliation
Medical Group, Amnesty International, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Torture. 2008;18(2):77-86
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety
Cicatrix - etiology - psychology
Denmark
Depression - etiology - rehabilitation
Health status
Humans
International Cooperation
Prisoners - psychology
Refugees - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Torture - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Violence - psychology
Wounds and Injuries - classification
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An unknown number of asylum seekers arriving in Denmark have been exposed to torture or have experienced other traumatising events in their country of origin. The health of traumatised asylum seekers, both physically and mentally, is affected upon arrival to Denmark, and time in asylum centres leads to further deterioration in health. METHODS: One hundred forty-two (N=142) newly arrived asylum seekers were examined at Center Sandholm by Amnesty International Danish Medical Group from the 1st of September until the 31st of December 2007. FINDINGS: The asylum seekers came from 33 different countries, primarily representing Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Chechnya. Of the asylum seekers, 45 percent had been exposed to torture--approximately one-third within the year of arrival to Denmark. Unsystematic blows, personal threats or threats to family, degrading treatment, isolation, and witnessing torture of others were the main torture methods reported. The majority of the asylum seekers had witnessed armed conflict, persecution, and imprisonment. The study showed that physical symptoms were approximately twice as frequent and psychological symptoms were approximately two to three times as frequent among torture survivors as among non-tortured asylum seekers. However, even the health of non-tortured asylum seekers was affected. Among the torture survivors, 63 percent fulfilled the criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, and 30-40 percent of the torture survivors were depressed, in anguish, anxious, and tearful in comparison to 5-10 percent of the non-tortured asylum seekers. Further, 42 percent of torture survivors had torture-related scars. INTERPRETATION: Torture survivors amid newly arrived asylum seekers are an extremely vulnerable group, hence examination and inquiry about the torture history is extremely important in order to identify this population to initiate the necessary medical treatment and social assistance. Amnesty International Danish Medical group is currently planning a follow-up study of the present population which will focus on changes in health status during their time in Denmark.
PubMed ID
19289884 View in PubMed
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Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276606
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):556-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Liv Mellesdal
Rolf Gjestad
Erik Johnsen
Hugo A Jørgensen
Ketil J Oedegaard
Rune A Kroken
Lars Mehlum
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):556-62
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Random Allocation
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (? = .21, p
Notes
Erratum In: J Trauma Stress. 2016 Feb;29(1):10626915448
PubMed ID
26581019 View in PubMed
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Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2012 Aug;40(6):901-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Thormod Idsoe
Atle Dyregrov
Ella Cosmovici Idsoe
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research, University of Stavanger, 4036, Stavanger, Norway. thormod.idsoe@uis.no
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2012 Aug;40(6):901-11
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bullying - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n?=?963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that boys were 2.27 times more likely to be exposed to frequent bullying than girls. A latent variable second-order model demonstrated an association between frequency of bullying exposure and PTSD symptoms (beta?=?0.49). This relationship was not moderated by gender. However, the average levels of PTSD symptoms as well as clinical range symptoms were higher for girls. For all bullied students, 27.6% of the boys and 40.5% of the girls had scores within the clinical range. A mimic model showed that youth who identify as being both a bully and a victim of bullying were more troubled than those who were victims only. Our findings support the idea that exposure to bullying is a potential risk factor for PTSD symptoms among students. Future research could investigate whether the same holds for PTSD through diagnostic procedures, but this will depend on whether or not bullying is decided to comply with the DSM-IV classification of trauma required for diagnosis. Results are discussed with regard to their implications for school interventions.
PubMed ID
22391775 View in PubMed
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Canadian military personnel's population attributable fractions of mental disorders and mental health service use associated with combat and peacekeeping operations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154695
Source
Am J Public Health. 2008 Dec;98(12):2191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jitender Sareen
Shay-Lee Belik
Tracie O Afifi
Gordon J G Asmundson
Brian J Cox
Murray B Stein
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. sareen@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2008 Dec;98(12):2191-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment
Patient Education as Topic
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Relief Work
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated mental disorders, suicidal ideation, self-perceived need for treatment, and mental health service utilization attributable to exposure to peacekeeping and combat operations among Canadian military personnel.
With data from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2 Canadian Forces Supplement, a cross-sectional population-based survey of active Canadian military personnel (N = 8441), we estimated population attributable fractions (PAFs) of adverse mental health outcomes.
Exposure to either combat or peacekeeping operations was associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (men: PAF = 46.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 27.3, 62.7; women: PAF = 23.6%; 95% CI = 9.2, 40.1), 1 or more mental disorder assessed in the survey (men: PAF = 9.3%; 95% CI = 0.4, 18.1; women: PAF = 6.1%; 95% CI = 0.0, 13.4), and a perceived need for information (men: PAF = 12.3%; 95% CI = 4.1, 20.6; women: PAF = 7.9%; 95% CI = 1.3, 15.5).
A substantial proportion, but not the majority, of mental health-related outcomes were attributable to combat or peacekeeping deployment. Future studies should assess traumatic events and their association with physical injury during deployment, premilitary factors, and postdeployment psychosocial factors that may influence soldiers' mental health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18923111 View in PubMed
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166 records – page 1 of 17.