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Access to health programs at the workplace and the reduction of work presenteeism: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106463
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;55(11):1318-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Arnaldo Sanchez Bustillos
Oswaldo Ortiz Trigoso
Author Affiliation
From the School of Population and Public Health (Dr Bustillos), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and Occupational Medicine Postgraduate Program (Dr Trigoso), Faculty of Medicine, Cayetano Heredia University, Lima, Peru.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;55(11):1318-22
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Efficiency
Female
Health promotion
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Self Report
Sick Leave
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine access to health programs at workplace as a determinant of presenteeism among adults.
Data source was a subsample of the 2009-2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. The outcome was self-reported reduced activities at work (presenteeism). The explanatory variable was self-reported access to a health program at workplace. Logistic regression was used to measure the association between outcome and explanatory variables adjusting for potential confounders.
Adjusting for sex, age, education, income, work stress, and chronic conditions, presenteeism was not associated with having access to a health program at workplace (adjusted odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.65). The odds of presenteeism were higher in workers who reported high work stress and those with chronic medical conditions.
This study found that access to health programs at workplace is not significantly associated with a decline in presenteeism.
PubMed ID
24164761 View in PubMed
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Acculturation stress and alcohol usage among Canadian Indians in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233377
Source
Can J Public Health. 1988 Mar-Apr;79(2):115-8
Publication Type
Article

Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91600
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2008 Oct;16(4):233-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Forslund Kerstin
Quell Robin
Sørlie Venke
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro University, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden. kerstin.forslund@oru.se
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2008 Oct;16(4):233-40
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chest Pain - psychology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Change Events
Loneliness
Male
Middle Aged
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation.
PubMed ID
18929341 View in PubMed
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Acute illnesses in children. A description and analysis of parents' perception of illness threat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35879
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Mar;12(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
B W Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Department of General Practice, Odense.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Mar;12(1):15-9
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Parents - psychology
Perception
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sampling Studies
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES--To identify families in which the parents reported the child's illness as particularly stressful (high perception of illness threat), and to find out which health problems the parents perceive as particularly threatening. DESIGN--The parents registered the diagnosis and perception of illness threat in relation to the child's latest illness within a four-week retrospective period. Selected psychosocial conditions of the families were recorded in the same questionnaire. SETTING--18,949 families with at least one child under the age of 8 years, resident in the County of Ringkøbing in western Denmark at 1 March 1988. SUBJECTS--An age-stratified random sample of 1982 families was entered in the study. 85% of the families returned the questionnaire. RESULTS--There was a considerable variation in the parents' perception of illness threat. On the basis of a score it was possible to group parents with a high, medium, and low perception of illness threat. Every fourth family reported a high perception of illness threat. A multivariate analysis, with a high perception of illness threat as dependent and selected psychosocial conditions and the diagnosis as independent variables, led to the following main results: 1) parents with a high perception of the general health threat ("worried" parents) most frequently reported a high perception of illness threat, 2) the diagnoses were decisive; in particular, inflammation in the middle ear, bronchitis, pneumonia, and accidents led to the parents' reporting a high perception of illness threat, 3) parents without experience of children and children's illnesses more frequently perceived an actual illness as a high illness threat than parents with this experience, 4) parents more frequently perceive an illness in girls as a high illness threat. CONCLUSIONS--"Worried" parents, without experience of children and children's illnesses, perceive the child's latest illness as a high illness threat. These families need special care.
PubMed ID
8009094 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction in middle-aged women: narrations from the patients and their partners during rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54063
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2000 Aug;16(4):256-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
M. Svedlund
I. Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund. Marianne.Svedlund@hvs.mh.se
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2000 Aug;16(4):256-65
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Denial (Psychology)
Emotions
Fear
Female
Freedom
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shame
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning of lived experiences after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and being a partner to an afflicted woman, as it is narrated during rehabilitation. Nine women and their partners narrated their experiences three and twelve months after AMI. The interview texts were transcribed and then interpreted, using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The result showed that their experiences of the illness contained two themes: 'rehabilitation needed' and 'loss of freedom' which contains eight sub-themes; 'adapting to it', 'struggling against it', 'living as normally as possible', 'having insight into how it can be', 'feeling guilty and ashamed about being weak', 'withholding feelings', 'feeling useless', and 'feeling fatigued and losing strength'. After further interpretation, the themes gave a deeper meaning of living with AMI and how it affects women and their partners. The women conceded that they felt distressed and vulnerable but struggled against the fear the illness means. The partner's role appears to be one of trying to adapt to the women's experiences of the illness. That the women withheld their feelings and did not talk about them indicates a lack of communication between the couples. As coronary care nurses often come very close both to the afflicted persons and the relatives they fill an important function in each patient's recovery. The nurses could help and prepare the patients and their relatives to understand better such feelings and reactions as could appear after discharge from hospital.
PubMed ID
10922190 View in PubMed
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Adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism in medical students: a longitudinal investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192564
Source
Med Educ. 2001 Nov;35(11):1034-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
M W Enns
B J Cox
J. Sareen
P. Freeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Med Educ. 2001 Nov;35(11):1034-42
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Art
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Personality
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
The personality of medical students may have an important impact on both their academic performance and emotional adjustment during medical school. There has been little systematic study of the impact of perfectionism on medical students. The present study sought to compare the perfectionism profile of medical students with that of a general arts student group and to examine the relationship among perfectionism, distress symptoms and academic expectations and satisfaction.
Medical students (n=96) and arts students (n=289) completed a baseline assessment including two multidimensional perfectionism scales. The medical students also completed measures of distress symptoms, personality (neuroticism, conscientiousness) and questions about their perceptions of their academic performance. Of the medical students, 58 completed a second set of questionnaires 6 months later (time 2).
First-, second- and third year medical students and first-year arts students.
In comparison with arts students, the perfectionism profile of medical students showed higher personal standards, lower doubts about actions and lower maladaptive perfectionism scores. In the medical students adaptive perfectionism (achievement striving) was significantly correlated with baseline academic performance expectations and conscientiousness and was predictive of dissatisfaction with academic performance at time 2. Maladaptive perfectionism (excessive evaluative concerns) was significantly correlated with baseline distress symptoms and neuroticism and was predictive of symptoms of depression and hopelessness at time 2.
Perfectionism in medical students differs systematically from perfectionism in general arts students. Distinguishing adaptive and maladaptive aspects of perfectionism is important in understanding the cross-sectional and longitudinal implications of perfectionism for medical students.
PubMed ID
11703639 View in PubMed
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Adding a baby to the equation. married and cohabiting women's relationship satisfaction in the transition to parenthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126051
Source
Fam Process. 2012 Mar;51(1):122-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Øystein Mortensen
Torbjørn Torsheim
Ole Melkevik
Frode Thuen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. oystein.mortensen@uib.no
Source
Fam Process. 2012 Mar;51(1):122-39
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Models, Psychological
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Report
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Time Factors
Women's health
Abstract
The trajectory of relationship satisfaction among married and cohabiting women in their transition to parenthood was compared in a potential sample of 71,504 women taking part in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Prospective longitudinal data were collected in 4 waves over a 2-year period starting 6 months prebirth. Results from latent curve models suggested that married and cohabiting women experience similar negative change in relationship satisfaction during the transition to parenthood. However, cohabiting women start off and stay less satisfied throughout the transition period, suggesting the presence of a negative cohabitation effect that prevailed after controlling for various covariates. Extending investigation on the cohabitation effect to the transition to parenthood, and replicating it in a Scandinavian context, is discussed in relation to the understanding of what causes the cohabitation effect, and its clinical implications.
PubMed ID
22428715 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' deliberate self-harm, interpersonal stress, and the moderating effects of self-regulation: a two-wave longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134898
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2011 Apr;49(2):249-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Göran Jutengren
Margaret Kerr
Håkan Stattin
Author Affiliation
Center for Developmental Research at JPS, Örebro University, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden. g.jutengren@spray.se
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2011 Apr;49(2):249-64
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Bullying - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Peer Group
Prevalence
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Social Control, Informal
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The predictive effects of peer victimization and harsh parenting on deliberate self-harm were examined. As derived from the experiential avoidance model, the study also tested whether these links were moderated by individual self-regulation approaches. Data were collected at two points in time from 880 junior high school students (mean age=13.72) in Sweden. Analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that Peer Victimization was predictive of self-harm. Although Harsh Parenting was not predictive of self-harm, this link was moderated by adolescents' gender. No moderating effect of self-regulation was revealed. The study concludes that the high prevalence of deliberate self-harm recently found in community samples of adolescents cannot be prevented without attending to environmental psychosocial factors.
PubMed ID
21530766 View in PubMed
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Source
Int J Behav Med. 2003;10(2):181-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Joaquim J F Soares
Orjan Sundin
Giorgio Grossi
Author Affiliation
Unit of Mental Health and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. joaquim.soares@smd.sll.se
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2003;10(2):181-90
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pain - drug therapy - psychology
Pain Measurement
Poverty Areas
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Unemployment
Abstract
Using questionnaires, we analyzed associations between different pain variables (e.g., pain intensity) and age (20-65+ years) among 949 primary pain patients. Older patients (a) were more often divorced, were blue-collar workers, were less educated, and had greater difficulties with living expenses; (b) had pain of longer duration, more frequently and of more complexity, and felt more disabled; (c) consumed more painkillers, analgesics, sedatives, and other medications, and had received more pain treatments; and (d) had more health problems. Younger patients had more severe pain, were financially strained, and were more often unemployed. A multivariate regression analysis showed that high disability was more determined by older than young age. However, other factors (e.g., pain complexity) were also important. Thus, older and younger patients experienced their pain differently
PubMed ID
12763710 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related problems among adolescent suicides in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201402
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1999 May-Jun;34(3):320-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
S P Pirkola
M J Marttunen
M M Henriksson
E T Isometsa
M E Heikkinen
J K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1999 May-Jun;34(3):320-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - psychology
Ethanol - blood
Family - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We studied 106 adolescent suicides out of a total nationwide population of 1397 suicides. Forty-four (42%) of these 13-22-year-old victims were classified as having suffered either a DSM-III-R alcohol use disorder or diagnostically subthreshold alcohol misuse according to retrospective evaluation using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST). These victims were found to differ from the other adolescent suicides in several characteristics: they were more likely to have comorbid categorical DSM-III-R disorders, antisocial behaviour, disturbed family backgrounds, precipitating life-events as stressors and severe psychosocial impairment. In addition, they also had a greater tendency to be alcohol-intoxicated at the time of the suicidal act, which tended to occur during weekends, suggesting that drinking in itself, and its weekly pattern, each contributed to the completion of their suicides.
PubMed ID
10414606 View in PubMed
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408 records – page 1 of 41.