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The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II - Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168976
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
N A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Raj Padwal
Ross D Feldman
Norman Rc Campbell
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Michael D Hill
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Carol Herbert
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Ellen Burgess
B. Hemmelgarn
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Robyn Houlden
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques Dechamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Sheldon Tobe
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcohol Drinking
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - therapy
Kidney Diseases - therapy
Life Style
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Patient compliance
Potassium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. For lifestyle interventions, blood pressure (BP) lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week in men or nine standard drinks per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management in selected individuals. Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. BP should be lowered to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (regardless of the degree of proteinuria). Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve these target BPs. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in nonblack patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16755313 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and impact of pet visitation on a pediatric cardiology inpatient unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188040
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2002 Oct;17(5):354-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Adam S Wu
Ruta Niedra
Lisa Pendergast
Brian W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8.
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2002 Oct;17(5):354-62
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Animals
Bonding, Human-Pet
Cardiology
Child
Child, Hospitalized
Child, Preschool
Heart Diseases - psychology - therapy
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Inpatients
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Visitors to Patients
Abstract
We evaluated the effectiveness of a pet visitation program in helping children and their families adjust to hospitalization on a pediatric cardiology ward. Thirty-one pet visits were observed and followed by interviews with patients and parents. Analysis of data suggested that pet visits relieved stress, normalized the hospital milieu, and improved patient and parent morale. The benefit received by the subjects correlated with the amount of physical contact and rapport developed with the visiting animal.
PubMed ID
12395303 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active and passive distraction in children undergoing wound dressings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122420
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):158-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Stefan Nilsson
Karin Enskär
Carina Hallqvist
Eva Kokinsky
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Borås University, Borås, Sweden. stefan_r.nilsson@hb.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):158-66
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bandages - adverse effects
Candy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - etiology - prevention & control
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Sweden
Video Games
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test how distraction influences pain, distress and anxiety in children during wound care. Sixty participants aged 5-12 years were randomized to three groups: serious gaming, the use of lollipops and a control group. Self-reported pain, distress, anxiety and observed pain behaviour were recorded in conjunction with wound care. Serious gaming, an active distraction, reduced the observed pain behaviour and self-reported distress compared with the other groups. A sense of control and engagement in the distraction, together, may be the explanation for the different pain behaviours when children use serious gaming.
PubMed ID
22819747 View in PubMed
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Addressing suffering through an inter-professional online module: learning with, from, and about each other.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130885
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(3):244-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Pippa Hall
Lynda Weaver
Timothy G Willett
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. phall@bruyere.org
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(3):244-6
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Distance - methods
Education, Professional - methods
Humans
Internet
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Palliative Care
Pilot Projects
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Telecommunications
PubMed ID
21957803 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions when using different patient education methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121314
Source
J Perioper Pract. 2012 Jul;22(7):226-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Katja Heikkinen
Sanna Salanterä
Tiina Leppänen
Tero Vahlberg
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland. katheik@utu.fi
Source
J Perioper Pract. 2012 Jul;22(7):226-31
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - psychology
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Depression - prevention & control
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Orthopedic Procedures - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Abstract
A randomised controlled trial was used to evaluate elective ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions during internet-based patient education or face-to-face education with a nurse. The internet-based patient education was designed for this study and patients used websites individually based on their needs. Patients in the control group participated individually in face-to-face patient education with a nurse in the ambulatory surgery unit. The theoretical basis for both types of education was the same. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients scored their emotions rather low at intervals throughout the whole surgical process, though their scores also changed during the surgical process. Emotion scores did not decrease after patient education. No differences in patients' emotions were found to result from either of the two different patient education methods.
PubMed ID
22919767 View in PubMed
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An everyday struggle-Swedish families' lived experiences during a child's cancer treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148338
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Oct;24(5):423-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Maria Björk
Thomas Wiebe
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. maria.bjork@med.lu.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Oct;24(5):423-32
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Family Health
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate families' lived experience during a child's cancer treatment. Interviews were conducted with members of 11 affected families. A hermeneutical phenomenological approach was chosen. "Focus on the ill child-An everyday struggle" emerged as an essential theme. The families' lived experience of daily life was described as "feeling drained," "disrupting family life," "feeling locked up and isolated," "retaining normality," "becoming experts," and "changing perspectives." The result indicates that life during a child's cancer treatment is a taxing period and that the entire family is in need of support to ease their burdens.
PubMed ID
19782901 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An experiment involving elderly women in their own health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239123
Source
Infirm Can. 1985 Mar;27(3):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1985

An innovative self-care module for palliative care medical learners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114286
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Jun;16(6):603-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Hyon C Kim
Elaine Rapp
Ashlinder Gill
Jeff Myers
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hyon.kim@sunnybrook.ca
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Jun;16(6):603-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Inservice Training - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Palliative Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - psychology
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
Palliative care is a uniquely demanding field in that clinicians routinely address the complex needs of patients living with incurable illness. Due to their relative inexperience, medical learners completing a palliative care educational experience are particularly vulnerable to the stresses that are often encountered. To address this educational need, a structured Self-Care Module was developed for medical learners rotating through a palliative care clinical rotation. Components of this module include completion of a process recording exercise, a structured reflection, and participation in a facilitated group discussion. An examination of the acceptability, utility, and operational feasibility of the module demonstrated that 86% (n=35) of learners found the module helpful in reflecting on their clinical encounters, 86% (n=35) gained an appreciation for the importance of self-reflection and self-awareness as a component of self-care and 97% (n=35) gained a greater appreciation for sharing clinical experiences with other learners. This novel Self-Care Module was found to be a well accepted, useful, and operationally feasible educational experience for postgraduate and undergraduate learners completing a palliative care educational experience.
PubMed ID
23631613 View in PubMed
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161 records – page 1 of 17.