Skip header and navigation

Refine By

682 records – page 1 of 69.

A 12-year Trend of Psychological Distress: National Study of Finnish University Students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285639
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Airi Oksanen
Katri Laimi
Katja Björklund
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Kristina Kunttu
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
The study aimed to explore changes in the prevalence of psychological distress and co-occurring psychological symptoms among 19-34 years old Finnish university students between the years 2000 and 2012.
The prevalence of perceived frequent psychological symptoms was compared in four nationwide cross-sectional student health surveys with random samples (N=11,502) in the following years: 2000 (N=3,174), 2004 (N=3,153), 2008 (N=2,750), and 2012 (N=2,425).
In the time phase from 2000 to 2012, the overall psychological distress (12-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-12) increased from 22% to 28%, while there was also an increase in the frequently experienced psychological symptoms (depressiveness from 13% to 15%, anxiety from 8% to 13%, concentration problems from 12% to 18%, and psychological tension from 13% to 18% with a peak prevalence observed in 2008). The co-occurrence of different psychological symptoms increased as well. Psychological distress was more common in females and in older students.
The findings suggest an increasing trend of frequent psychological distress among Finnish university students over the years from 2000 to 2012, with the peak prevalence occurring in 2008, which may reflect the growing multifaceted environmental demands.
PubMed ID
28662321 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2015 National Canadian Homeless Youth Survey: Mental Health and Addiction Findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291013
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Sean A Kidd
Stephen Gaetz
Bill O'Grady
Author Affiliation
1 Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Homeless Youth - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sexual and Gender Minorities - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study was designed to provide a representative description of the mental health of youth accessing homelessness services in Canada. It is the most extensive survey in this area to date and is intended to inform the development of mental health and addiction service and policy for this marginalized population.
This study reports mental health-related data from the 2015 "Leaving Home" national youth homelessness survey, which was administered through 57 agencies serving homeless youth in 42 communities across the country. This self-reported, point-in-time survey assessed a broad range of demographic information, pre-homelessness and homelessness variables, and mental health indicators.
Survey data were obtained from 1103 youth accessing Canadian homelessness services in the Nunavut territory and all Canadian provinces except for Prince Edward Island. Forty-two per cent of participants reported 1 or more suicide attempts, 85.4% fell in a high range of psychological distress, and key indicators of risk included an earlier age of the first episode of homelessness, female gender, and identifying as a sexual and/or gender minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and 2 spirit [LGBTQ2S]).
This study provides clear and compelling evidence of a need for mental health support for these youth, particularly LGBTQ2S youth and female youth. The mental health concerns observed here, however, must be considered in the light of the tremendous adversity in all social determinants faced by these youth, with population-level interventions best leveraged in prevention and rapid response.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Aug 29;352(9129):743 PMID 9729028
Cites: J Youth Adolesc. 2012 May;41(5):533-43 PMID 22302217
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Aug;57(3):561-9 PMID 12791497
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;60(11):467-74 PMID 26720504
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Aug 4;292(5):569-74 PMID 15292082
Cites: Am J Addict. 2006;15 Suppl 1:80-91 PMID 17182423
Cites: J Adolesc. 2011 Oct;34(5):1049-54 PMID 21122909
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2004 Mar;13(2):299-310 PMID 15085902
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Dec;45(6):571-8 PMID 19931829
Cites: J Adolesc. 2007 Apr;30(2):283-96 PMID 16631925
Cites: J Couns Psychol. 2010 Jul;57(3):274-89 PMID 21133579
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;46(7):617-21 PMID 11582822
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Oct 1;67(10 ):1083-1090 PMID 27247178
Cites: J Nurs Meas. 2009;17(2):105-13 PMID 19711709
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 May;92(5):773-7 PMID 11988446
PubMed ID
28372467 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abuse is in the eye of the beholder. Report by family members about abuse of demented persons in home care. A total population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73259
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):247-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
M. Grafström
A. Nordberg
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):247-55
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - nursing
Elder Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Family - psychology
Female
Health status
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a population-based study 219 family members of cognitively impaired elderly (casegroup) and 255 family members of cognitively healthy elderly (control-group) were interviewed about their situation as a caregiver to an old person. Twenty-six family members in the case-group reported abusive behavior in the care of the elderly at home. These family members are compared with 154 family members in the control-group, reporting other coping strategies than abusive. In the abusive group most of the elderly were in a mild stage of dementia, and the family members reported more strain in the care situation. The family members were older, judged their health as deteriorated, and were mostly living together with the dependent elderly.
PubMed ID
8310277 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of pain: a study in patients with advanced cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151850
Source
Pain. 2009 May;143(1-2):147-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Lynn R Gauthier
Gary Rodin
Camilla Zimmermann
David Warr
Malcolm Moore
Frances Shepherd
Lucia Gagliese
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Pain. 2009 May;143(1-2):147-54
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Pain, among the most common symptoms of cancer, impacts on multiple domains of wellbeing. Significant numbers of patients continue to experience pain despite pharmacological interventions. Although there is evidence to suggest that acceptance of pain is related to better wellbeing among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain, little is known about acceptance of cancer pain. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the correlates of pain acceptance in 81 patients with advanced cancer and pain. Demographic, disease, and treatment-related information was collected, and patients completed measures of pain, physical, psychological, and social/relational wellbeing and pain acceptance. Multivariate regression models, using backward elimination, determined the correlates of each subscale of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire separately. Activity Engagement was negatively associated with depressive symptoms. Pain Willingness was negatively associated with pain catastrophizing. Parents living with children had lower Pain Willingness scores than non-parents. These relationships were independent of pain severity and physical functioning. These preliminary results suggest that acceptance of cancer pain is related to better psychological wellbeing and that there may be a relational element, with parents at risk of experiencing difficulty in adapting to ongoing cancer pain. These data lay the groundwork for future research and interventions designed to enhance quality of life for patients with advanced cancer and pain.
PubMed ID
19321264 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute phase predictors of subsequent psychosocial burden in carers of elderly stroke patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195006
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2001;11(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B. Thommessen
T B Wyller
E. Bautz-Holter
K. Laake
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevaal Hospital, Oslo, Norway. bente.thommessen@ioks.uio.no
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2001;11(3):201-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Caregivers - psychology
Cognition
Disabled Persons
Family
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Housekeeping
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Motor Activity
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Regression Analysis
Social Adjustment
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Stroke - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective was to describe the psychosocial burden experienced by informal carers of elderly stroke victims, and to identify its predictors among baseline characteristics of the patients. From a prospective study of 171 elderly stroke patients admitted to a geriatric ward for rehabilitation in the acute phase, 68 patients living at home with a primary caregiver were identified 6 months after the stroke. At baseline, all the patients were assessed with respect to motor function, cognitive function, global handicap and activities of daily living, and after 6 months the caregivers were assessed, using the Relatives' Stress Scale. According to this, the most frequent impacts were worries that an accident might befall their relatives, that they had to reorganise their household routines and further, that their social life and ability to take holidays had been reduced. Impaired cognitive function was the only baseline patient characteristic that predicted a subsequent psychosocial burden on the carer. Special attention should be paid to elderly stroke patients initially assessed with impaired cognitive function and their caregivers.
PubMed ID
11306768 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute stress disorder after myocardial infarction: prevalence and associated factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154428
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Nov;70(9):1028-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Marie-Anne Roberge
Gilles Dupuis
André Marchand
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Nov;70(9):1028-34
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Personality Inventory
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To examine the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) after a myocardial infarction (MI) and the factors associated with its development.
Of 1344 MI patients admitted to three Canadian hospitals, 474 patients did not meet the inclusion criteria and 393 declined participation in the study; 477 patients consented to participate in the study. A structured interview and questionnaires were administered to patients 48 hours to 14 days post MI (mean +/- standard deviation = 4 +/- 2.73 days).
Four percent were classified as having ASD using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, ASD module. The presence of symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory; odds ratio (OR) = 29.92) and the presence of perceived distress during the MI (measured using the question "How difficult/upsetting was the experience of your MI?"; OR = 3.42, R(2) = .35) were associated with the presence of symptoms of ASD on the Modified PTSD Symptom Scale. The intensity of the symptoms of depression was associated with the intensity of ASD symptoms (R = .65). The models for the detection and estimation of ASD symptoms were validated by applying the regression equations to 72 participants not included in the initial regressions. The results obtained in the validation sample did not differ from those obtained in the initial sample.
The symptoms of depression and the subjective distress during the MI could be used to improve the detection of ASD.
PubMed ID
18981272 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptive behavior in stressful situations and stroke incidence in hypertensive men: results from prospective cohort study "men born in 1914" in Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193833
Source
Stroke. 2001 Aug;32(8):1712-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. André-Petersson
G. Engström
B. Hagberg
L. Janzon
G. Steen
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Lena.Andre-Petersson@psychology.lu.ses
Source
Stroke. 2001 Aug;32(8):1712-20
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - classification
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disease-Free Survival
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Neuropsychological Tests
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, many hypertensive persons remain healthy. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether adaptation in a stressful situation was associated with the incidence of stroke in hypertensive men.
Two hundred thirty-eight hypertensive men were followed from baseline in 1982/1983 until first stroke, death, or December 31, 1996. Adaptation to stress was studied with the serial Color-Word Test. In the Regression dimension, 4 patterns of adaptation could be distinguished according to mastering of the test. Successful mastering of the test was shown in stabilized patterns, increasing difficulty in cumulative patterns, fluctuating difficulty in dissociative patterns, and fluctuating difficulty that increased during testing in cumulative-dissociative patterns. The patterns were compared regarding stroke incidence.
Forty-three men experienced a stroke during follow-up. Stroke rates per 1000 person-years were 12.6 for men with stabilized patterns, 14.3 for men with cumulative patterns, 16.2 for men with dissociative patterns, and 31.2 for men with cumulative-dissociative patterns. Multivariate analysis, adjusted for relevant cerebrovascular risk factors, showed that the cumulative-dissociative pattern of the Regression dimension was associated with an increased risk of stroke during follow-up (relative risk 3.00, 95% CI 1.32 to 6.81).
The specific behavior pattern, characterized by the greatest difficulties in managing the test, was associated with incidence of stroke in hypertensive men. One interpretation is that hypertensive men who chronically fail to find successful strategies in stressful situations are vulnerable to the damaging effects of stress and thereby at an increased risk of a future stroke.
PubMed ID
11486095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing inequities in access to quality health care for indigenous people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154424
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):985-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2008
Author
David Peiris
Alex Brown
Alan Cass
Author Affiliation
George Institute for International Health, New South Wales, Australia.
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):985-6
Date
Nov-4-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australasia
Canada
Communication
Culture
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Population Groups
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
United States
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-1218981441
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 2005;35(3):465-7816119570
Cites: N Z Med J. 2002 Apr 26;115(1152):179-8212044000
Cites: Med J Aust. 2002 May 20;176(10):466-7012065009
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):53-914713698
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 1996 Oct;8(5):491-79117203
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:3118248667
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Dec;95(12):2173-916257947
Cites: Ethn Dis. 2006 Winter;16(1):295-30816599387
Cites: Lancet. 2006 May 27;367(9524):1775-8516731273
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 17;367(9527):2029-3116782494
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2006;6:3516872487
Comment On: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-1218981441
PubMed ID
18981431 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent adjustment and well-being: effects of parental divorce and distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45607
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2006 Feb;47(1):75-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Ingunn Størksen
Espen Røysamb
Turid L Holmen
Kristian Tambs
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway. ingunn.storksen@uis.no
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2006 Feb;47(1):75-84
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Divorce - psychology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Models, Psychological
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study investigates the long-term effects of parental divorce on adolescent psychological adjustment and well-being, and to what extent the effects are accounted for by parental psychological distress. Data were collected among 8,984 Norwegian adolescents (13-19 years) and their parents. Outcome variables were symptoms of anxiety and depression, subjective well-being, and three areas of school problems. Parental divorce was found to be associated with both higher mean levels and larger variances in adolescent problems. Divorce and parental distress contributed independently to adolescent distress, supporting the notion of "double exposure" effects. The prevalence of adolescents with substantial distress symptoms was 14% among those with non-distressed non-divorced parents and 30% among those with divorced and distressed parents. In general effects remained when controlling for demographic factors. Long-term effects of divorce on symptoms of anxiety and depression were stronger among girls than among boys.
PubMed ID
16433664 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent life with diabetes-Gender matters for level of distress. Experiences from the national TODS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292524
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2017 Nov; 18(7):651-659
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Gun Forsander
Mette Bøgelund
Josephine Haas
Ulf Samuelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clin Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, S-416 85 Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2017 Nov; 18(7):651-659
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - psychology - therapy
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - prevention & control
Hypoglycemia - prevention & control
Internet
Male
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychosocial Support Systems
Quality of Life
Registries
Risk
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the relationship between diabetes distress and gender, and the association with glycemic control, social support, health behaviors, and socio-economic status.
All adolescents, aged 15 to 18 years, in the national, pediatric diabetes registry SWEDIABKIDS with type 1 diabetes were invited to complete an online questionnaire. A total of 2112 teenagers were identified.
453 complete responses were valid for analyses. Young women scored significantly higher on the distress-screening instrument DDS-2. Almost half of the female respondents exhibited moderate to severe diabetes distress-more than twice the proportion than among male respondents (44% vs 19%). Females reported twice as high scores on the fear of hypoglycemia scale (P?
PubMed ID
28004484 View in PubMed
Less detail

682 records – page 1 of 69.