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About the strains caused by a marathon race to fitness joggers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250080
Source
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1977 Mar;17(1):49-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1977
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1988 Feb;65(1):10-1, 14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
A M Malek
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1988 Feb;65(1):10-1, 14
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Alberta
Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Motivation
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Seasons
Stress, Physiological
PubMed ID
3342947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation of astaxanthin by a new Haematococcus pluvialis strain BM1 from the white sea coastal rocks (Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261314
Source
Mar Drugs. 2014 Aug;12(8):4504-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Konstantin Chekanov
Elena Lobakova
Irina Selyakh
Larisa Semenova
Roman Sidorov
Alexei Solovchenko
Source
Mar Drugs. 2014 Aug;12(8):4504-20
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carotenoids - metabolism
Chlorophyta - metabolism
Cytoplasm - metabolism
Ecosystem
Environment
Light
Lipids
Nitrogen - metabolism
Phosphorus - metabolism
Russia
Salinity
Stress, Physiological - physiology
Temperature
Xanthophylls - metabolism
Abstract
We report on a novel arctic strain BM1 of a carotenogenic chlorophyte from a coastal habitat with harsh environmental conditions (wide variations in solar irradiance, temperature, salinity and nutrient availability) identified as Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow. Increased (25‰) salinity exerted no adverse effect on the growth of the green BM1 cells. Under stressful conditions (high light, nitrogen and phosphorus deprivation), green vegetative cells of H. pluvialis BM1 grown in BG11 medium formed non-motile palmelloid cells and, eventually, hematocysts capable of a massive accumulation of the keto-carotenoid astaxanthin with a high nutraceutical and therapeutic potential. Routinely, astaxanthin was accumulated at the level of 4% of the cell dry weight (DW), reaching, under prolonged stress, 5.5% DW. Astaxanthin was predominantly accumulated in the form of mono- and diesters of fatty acids from C16 and C18 families. The palmelloids and hematocysts were characterized by the formation of red-colored cytoplasmic lipid droplets, increasingly large in size and number. The lipid droplets tended to merge and occupied almost the entire volume of the cell at the advanced stages of stress-induced carotenogenesis. The potential application of the new strain for the production of astaxanthin is discussed in comparison with the H. pluvialis strains currently employed in microalgal biotechnology.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25196836 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A complex approach to evaluation of human genome instability].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168018
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2006;(4):36-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Iu A Revazova
L V Khripach
I E Sidorova
V V Iurchenko
I E Zykova
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2006;(4):36-41
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Genome, Human - genetics
Human Genome Project
Humans
Mutagenesis - genetics
Occupational Diseases - genetics
Occupational Exposure
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Russia
Abstract
In this study, evaluation of genome instability in individuals exposed to chemical compounds included detection of the genetic polymorphism of some xenobiotic metabolic enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1E1, PON1, GSTM1, GSTT1), as well as measurement of oxidative state chemiluminescent variables and the level of cytogenetic damage. According to the study, the level of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes shows a strong correlation with PON54 left allele and GSTM1 null genotype, and can be described by the polynomial function of blood plasma luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. The frequencies of micronuclei in buccal epithelium displayed a weak association with GSTT1 null genotype.
PubMed ID
16889354 View in PubMed
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Adaptation to SARS-CoV-2 under stress: Role of distorted information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305689
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2020 Sep; 50(9):e13294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2020
Author
Konstantin S Sharov
Author Affiliation
Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2020 Sep; 50(9):e13294
Date
Sep-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Care Surveys - methods
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Mass Media - statistics & numerical data
Medical Informatics
Moscow
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Stress, Physiological
Workload - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Since the time of global SARS-CoV-2 spread across the earth in February 2020, most of countries faced the problem of massive stress of their healthcare systems. In many cases, the structural stress was a result of incorrect allocation of medical care resources. In turn, this misallocation resulted from fear and apprehensions that superseded thorough calculations. A key role in exacerbating the healthcare sector overburdening was played by misleading information on the virus and disease caused by it. In the current paper, we study the situation in Russian healthcare system and advance recommendations how to avoid further crises.
(a) Surveying the medical personnel (231 doctors, 317 nurses and 355 ambulance medical workers of lower levels) in five hospitals and six ambulance centres in Moscow. (b) Content analysis of 3164 accounts in Russian segment of social networks (VKontakte, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Odnoklassniki); official and unofficial media (TV, informational webpages).
We revealed positive-feedback loop that threatened the sustainability of Russian care sector. The main knot was occupied by incorrect/exaggerated media coverage of COVID-19. General public scared by misinformation in media and social networks, started to panic. This negative social background undermined the productivity of a significant part of medical workers who were afraid of COVID-19 patients.
The most serious problems of Russian healthcare sector related to COVID-19 pandemic, were informational problems. The exaggerated information on COVID-19 had big negative influence upon Russian society and healthcare system, despite SARS-CoV-2 relatively low epidemiological hazard.
PubMed ID
32474908 View in PubMed
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Adapting to environmental stresses: the role of the microbiota in controlling innate immunity and behavioral responses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128781
Source
Immunol Rev. 2012 Jan;245(1):250-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Caio T Fagundes
Flávio A Amaral
Antônio L Teixeira
Danielle G Souza
Mauro M Teixeira
Author Affiliation
Immunopharmacology, Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.
Source
Immunol Rev. 2012 Jan;245(1):250-64
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Biological
Animals
Bacterial Infections - immunology - microbiology - psychology
Behavior
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Humans
Immunity, Innate
Inflammation - immunology
Nociceptors - immunology
Stress, Physiological - immunology
Abstract
Mammals are subject to colonization by an astronomical number of mutualistic and commensal microorganisms on their environmental exposed surfaces. These mutualistic species build up a complex community, called the indigenous microbiota, which aid their hosts in several physiological activities. In this review, we show that the transition between a non-colonized and a colonized state is associated with modification on the pattern of host inflammatory and behavioral responsiveness. There is a shift from innate anti-inflammatory cytokine production to efficient release of proinflammatory mediators and rapid mobilization of leukocytes upon infection or other stimuli. In addition, host responses to hypernociceptive and stressful stimuli are modulated by indigenous microbiota, partly due to the altered pattern of innate and acquired immune responsiveness of the non-colonized host. These altered responses ultimately lead to significant alteration in host behavior to environmental threats. Therefore, host colonization by indigenous microbiota modifies the way the host perceives and reacts to environmental stimuli, improving resilience of the entire host-microorganism consortium to environmental stresses.
Notes
Erratum In: Immunol Rev. 2014 Jul;260(1):261
PubMed ID
22168425 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-dependent increase in oxidative stress in gastrocnemius muscle with unloading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91973
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2008 Dec;105(6):1695-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Siu Parco M
Pistilli Emidio E
Alway Stephen E
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Health Technology and Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. htpsiu@inet.polyu.edu.hk
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2008 Dec;105(6):1695-705
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Blotting, Western
Catalase - metabolism
Female
Hindlimb Suspension - physiology
Hydrogen Peroxide - metabolism
Male
Malondialdehyde - metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal - growth & development - metabolism - physiology
Organ Size - physiology
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Superoxide Dismutase - metabolism
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
Oxidative stress increases during unloading in muscle from young adult rats. The present study examined the markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme gene and protein expressions in medial gastrocnemius muscles of aged and young adult (30 and 6 mo of age) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats after 14 days of hindlimb suspension. Medial gastrocnemius muscle weight was decreased by approximately 30% in young adult and aged rats following suspension. When muscle weight was normalized to animal body weight, it was reduced by 12% and 22% in young adult and aged rats, respectively, after suspension. Comparisons between young adult and aged control animals demonstrated a 25% and 51% decline in muscle mass when expressed as absolute muscle weight and muscle weight normalized to the animal body weight, respectively. H(2)O(2) content was elevated by 43% while Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein content was reduced by 28% in suspended muscles compared with control muscles exclusively in the aged animals. Suspended muscles had greater content of malondialdehyde (MDA)/4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HAE) (29% and 58% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively), nitrotyrosine (76% and 65% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively), and catalase activity (69% and 43% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively) relative to control muscles. Changes in oxidative stress markers MDA/4-HAE, H(2)O(2), and MnSOD protein contents in response to hindlimb unloading occurred in an age-dependent manner. These findings are consistent with the hypotheses that oxidative stress has a role in mediating disuse-induced and sarcopenia-associated muscle losses. Our data suggest that aging may predispose skeletal muscle to increased levels of oxidative stress both at rest and during unloading.
PubMed ID
18801960 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age trajectories of physiological indices in relation to healthy life course.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101888
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2011 Mar;132(3):93-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Konstantin G Arbeev
Svetlana V Ukraintseva
Igor Akushevich
Alexander M Kulminski
Liubov S Arbeeva
Lucy Akushevich
Irina V Culminskaya
Anatoliy I Yashin
Author Affiliation
Centre for Population Health and Aging, Duke University, Department of Sociology, Durham, NC 27708-0408, USA. konstantin.arbeev@duke.edu
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2011 Mar;132(3):93-102
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Blood pressure
Cohort Studies
Female
Hematocrit
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Sex Factors
Stress, Physiological
Abstract
We analysed relationship between the risk of onset of "unhealthy life" (defined as the onset of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, or diabetes) and longitudinal changes in body mass index, diastolic blood pressure, hematocrit, pulse pressure, pulse rate, and serum cholesterol in the Framingham Heart Study (Original Cohort) using the stochastic process model of human mortality and aging. The analyses demonstrate how decline in resistance to stresses and adaptive capacity accompanying human aging can be evaluated from longitudinal data. We showed how these components of the aging process, as well as deviation of the trajectories of physiological indices from those minimising the risk at respective ages, can lead to an increase in the risk of onset of unhealthy life with age. The results indicate the presence of substantial gender difference in aging related decline in stress resistance and adaptive capacity, which can contribute to differences in the shape of the sex-specific patterns of incidence rates of aging related diseases.
PubMed ID
21262255 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use in adolescents from northern Russia: the role of the social context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190237
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2002 May-Jun;37(3):297-303
Publication Type
Article
Author
Roman A Koposov
Vladislav V Ruchkin
Martin Eisemann
Pavel I Sidorov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2002 May-Jun;37(3):297-303
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Discriminant Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Stress, Physiological - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Drinking alcohol is an essential and commonplace part of life in Russia. Alcohol-related problems in the general population and among adolescents in particular has become a major public health concern. The problem cannot be solely explained by the frequency and quantity of alcohol consumption. The social determinants of drinking alcohol also need to be considered. These are the focus of the present investigation. The social determinants of drinking behaviour were assessed by self-reports (Social Context of Drinking Scale, Adolescent Alcohol Involvement Scale and Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index) in 387 secondary school students in Arkhangelsk, Russia. The factor structure for the Social Context of Drinking Scale was similar to that noted in respect of the original study [Thombs and Beck (1994) Health Education and Research 9, 13-22]. Significant gender differences in problem drinking and the social contexts of drinking were found. High intensity girl drinkers were likely to drink in most social contexts, whereas high intensity drinking boys were more likely to drink in the context of Stress Control. Furthermore, boy problem drinkers were more likely to drink in the context of School Defiance and Peer Acceptance, whereas girl problem drinkers tended to drink in the contexts of School Defiance and Stress Control. In general, the Social Context of Drinking Scale demonstrated a good ability to discriminate high from low intensity drinkers, and high from low problem drinkers. These results may provide useful information for targeted prevention programmes for adolescents.
PubMed ID
12003922 View in PubMed
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Altered plasma adipokines and markers of oxidative stress suggest increased risk of cardiovascular disease in First Nation youth with obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152924
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2009 Jun;10(4):269-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Danielle M Stringer
Elizabeth A C Sellers
Laura L Burr
Carla G Taylor
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2009 Jun;10(4):269-77
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipokines - blood
Adolescent
Antioxidants - analysis
Biological Markers - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Obesity - blood - complications - epidemiology
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Risk factors
Abstract
To evaluate cardiovascular disease risk in First Nation youth with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or obesity by comparing pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines, markers of oxidative stress and the plasma phospholipid fatty acid profile.
Self-declared First Nation youth (12-15 yr) with T2DM (n = 24) as well as age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched controls (obese group; n = 19) and unmatched controls (control group; n = 34) were recruited from a pediatric diabetes clinic.
Plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha, ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, resistin, and total antioxidant status were not different among the three groups. Plasma total leptin, soluble leptin receptor, and free leptin were significantly higher in the T2DM group than the control group (p
PubMed ID
19175895 View in PubMed
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320 records – page 1 of 32.