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Antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis in middle ear effusion during early phase of acute otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37907
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1990 Jan-Feb;109(1-2):111-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Karjalainen
M. Koskela
J. Luotonen
E. Herva
P. Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1990 Jan-Feb;109(1-2):111-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology - isolation & purification
Otitis Media with Effusion - immunology - microbiology
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
Serum type (IgG, IgM and IgA-class) and secretory type antibodies specific to Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn), Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Branhamella catarrhalis (Br) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 46 serum and 114 middle ear effusion (MEE) samples from 85 children with acute otitis media (AOM). The samples were obtained within 12 h from the onset of the ear symptoms. Serum (but not secretory) type antibodies to the infecting Pn serotype were found in 24% of the MEE samples of the patients with Pn AOM and, correspondingly, serum and/or secretory type antibodies to Hi and Br were seen in 54% and 63% of the MEE samples of the patients with Hi or Br AOM, respectively. Moreover, antibodies against bacteria other than the causative one could also be found in the MEE. The occurrence of the serum type antibodies against these bacteria in the MEE was closely correlated with their serum levels. The findings of this study indicate that during the very early phase of AOM, the MEE contains both serum type antibodies originating from the serum, and secretory antibodies of middle ear origin. Among them there are antibodies specific to the three most common bacteria causing AOM (Pn, Hi, and Br) regardless of the bacterial etiology of the AOM attack in question.
PubMed ID
2106760 View in PubMed
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Antibody levels against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b in a population of splenectomized individuals with varying vaccination status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34132
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1997 Oct;119(2):167-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
H B Konradsen
C. Rasmussen
P. Ejstrud
J B Hansen
Author Affiliation
Streptococcus Unit, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1997 Oct;119(2):167-74
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Haemophilus Vaccines - immunology
Haemophilus influenzae type b - immunology
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Population Surveillance
Splenectomy - adverse effects
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Time Factors
Abstract
In order to determine antibody levels against Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) in a population of splenectomized subjects, 561 persons in a Danish county, splenectomized between 1984 and 1993 were identified. Two hundred and thirty-five were alive and 149 participated in the study. Each person donated a blood sample for antibody determination by ELISA. Though vaccine coverage among the 149 persons was 91% only 52% had 'protective' levels of pneumococcal antibodies. Despite recommendations for regular follow-up on pneumococcal antibody levels this had only been carried out in 4% of the subjects. Splenectomized subjects who needed pneumococcal revaccination were significantly more likely to have received their initial vaccination less than 14 days before or after splenectomy, as recommended, than those not requiring revaccination. Therefore, the timing of initial pneumococcal vaccination in relation to splenectomy seems to be important. All persons had Hib antibody levels higher than 0.15 microgram/ml and 60% had levels higher than 1 microgram/ml, which are the levels thought to provide short term and long term protection, respectively. In total, 37% of the 149 persons tested had pneumococcal and Hib antibody levels thought to correlate with protection from serious infections.
PubMed ID
9363015 View in PubMed
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Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in middle-aged and elderly patients recently treated for pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57692
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1994 Sep 12;154(17):1961-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-12-1994
Author
J U Hedlund
M E Kalin
A B Ortqvist
J. Henrichsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institute, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1994 Sep 12;154(17):1961-5
Date
Sep-12-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - immunology - therapy
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - immunology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Sweden
Vaccination
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of patients admitted to the hospital for pneumonia have been treated in a hospital during the preceding 4 to 5 years, and patients previously treated in a hospital for pneumonia seem to be at an especially high risk for another episode of pneumonia. Many cases of pneumococcal infection might therefore be prevented by immunizing admitted patients with pneumococcal vaccine at discharge or at follow-up. The aim of this study was to investigate the type-specific antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in middle-aged and elderly patients at follow-up 8 weeks after hospital treatment for pneumonia. METHODS: A total of 92 individuals, 50 to 85 years old, participated in the study. One group consisted of 65 individuals treated in the hospital for pneumonia 8 weeks before vaccination (mean age, 67 years), and another group consisted of 27 individuals who had not recently been treated for pneumonia (mean age, 67 years). All 92 individuals received a single dose of a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine. The type-specific antibody responses to six pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide antigens included in the vaccine as well as antibodies against the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine were measured before and 3 to 4 weeks after vaccination by use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The antibody concentrations before and after vaccination were comparable in the two groups, as were antibody fold increases from prevaccination to postvaccination serum. No serious adverse events were recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Pneumococcal vaccination at follow-up 8 weeks after treatment in the hospital for pneumonia seems to elicit an adequate antibody response without notable adverse reactions.
PubMed ID
8074600 View in PubMed
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Antibody response to the pneumococcal proteins pneumococcal surface adhesin A and pneumolysin in children with acute otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194603
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2001 May;20(5):482-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
S. Rapola
T. Kilpi
M. Lahdenkari
P H Mäkelä
H. Käyhty
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2001 May;20(5):482-7
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adhesins, Bacterial
Analysis of Variance
Antibody Formation - immunology
Bacterial Proteins
Carrier Proteins - immunology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Finland
Humans
Infant
Lipoproteins - immunology
Membrane Transport Proteins
Otitis Media - immunology
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Streptolysins - immunology
Abstract
Pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA) and pneumolysin (Ply) are common to virtually all Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, and they are immunogenic and protective against pneumococcal challenge in experimental animals. We have recently shown production of antibodies to PsaA and Ply in young children, but data on the immune response to these antigens during culture-confirmed pneumococcal infection are lacking.
To evaluate whether young children respond to S. pneumoniae by producing antibodies to PsaA and Ply during acute otitis media (AOM).
A cohort of 329 children was followed prospectively from the age of 2 months to the age of 2 years. Paired sera were obtained during episodes of AOM and used to measure antibodies to PsaA and Ply by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. S. pneumoniae cultured from the middle ear fluid was taken as evidence of pneumococcal AOM. The presence of S. pneumoniae in the nasopharyngeal aspirate collected in connection of AOM or any other respiratory infection or in the nasopharyngeal swab collected at scheduled visits was taken to indicate pneumococcal carriage and thus a history of previous contact with S. pneumoniae.
Children with previous pneumococcal contacts had high anti-PsaA and anti-Ply concentrations in the acute phase sera regardless of the nature (AOM or carriage) of the current pneumococcal contact. Of the children with no previous pneumococcal contact, those with current pneumococcal AOM had lower antibody concentrations than those with current pneumococcal carriage only. Anti-PsaA and anti-Ply responses were found in children with current pneumococcal contact. The antibody response was strongly associated with low acute phase antibody concentration, but not significantly with age and the nature of the current pneumococcal contact.
We showed that infants are capable of developing a specific antibody response to the pneumococcal proteins PsaA and Ply during AOM.
PubMed ID
11368104 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Aug 1;141(3):227-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1989
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Aug 1;141(3):227-8
Date
Aug-1-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bacterial Vaccines - therapeutic use
Canada
Female
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Humans
Immunization
Mass Screening
Pregnancy
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1987 Sep;126(3):484-913618580
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1987 May;69(5):701-43574797
Cites: Chest. 1987 Mar;91(3):436-433816320
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1985;20(6):601-73923626
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1986 Jan;104(1):1-63940476
Cites: Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1988 Aug 6;14(31):137-403242888
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1986 Jun;146(6):1207-83521520
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Jan 15;259(3):365-92961895
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1987 Sep;107(3):335-73039886
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Apr 15;134(8):897-9013955483
Cites: Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1985;33(6):437-443914014
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1986 May;140(5):428-323962935
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1988 May;108(5):653-73358567
PubMed ID
2752349 View in PubMed
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Changes in pneumococcal carriage prevalence and factors associated with carriage in Norwegian children, four years after introduction of PCV13.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307362
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Jan 10; 20(1):29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-10-2020
Author
A Løvlie
D F Vestrheim
I S Aaberge
A Steens
Author Affiliation
Division for Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH), P.o.box 222 Skøyen, 0213, Oslo, Norway. Astrid.Louise.Lovlie@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Jan 10; 20(1):29
Date
Jan-10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine - therapeutic use
Humans
Immunization Programs - trends
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Infant
Latex Fixation Tests
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pneumococcal Vaccines - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Serogroup
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate - therapeutic use
Abstract
Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage is often asymptomatic but can cause invasive pneumococcal disease. Pneumococcal carriage is a prerequisite for disease, with children as main reservoir and transmitters. Childhood carriage can therefore be used to determine which serotypes circulate in the population and which may cause disease in the non-vaccinated population. In 2006, a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced into the Norwegian Childhood Immunisation Programme, which was replaced by the more valent PCV13 in 2011. We investigated changes in pneumococcal carriage prevalence 4 years after switching to PCV13 compared to three previous surveys, and analysed factors associated with carriage in children.
We conducted a cross-sectional study in Norway, autumn 2015, among children attending day-care centres. We collected questionnaire data and nasopharyngeal swabs to identify pneumococcal serotypes. We compared the carriage prevalence in 2015 with surveys conducted in the same setting performed before widespread vaccination (2006; n?=?610), 2 years after PCV7 introduction (2008; n?=?600), and 2 years after switching to PCV13 (2013; n?=?874). Using multilevel logistic regression we determined the association between pneumococcal carriage and previously associated factors.
In 2015, 896 children participated, with age ranging from 8 to 80?months. The overall carriage prevalence was 48/100 children [95%CI 44-53] in 2015, 38% [29-46] lower than in 2006 pre-PCV7, and 23% [12-32] lower than in 2013, 2 years after switching to PCV13. The PCV13 carriage prevalence was 2.8/100 children [1.9-4.2] in 2015. Increasing age (p?
PubMed ID
31924177 View in PubMed
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Characterization of the antibody response to pneumococcal glycoconjugates and the effect of heat-labile enterotoxin on IGg subclasses after intranasal immunization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57486
Source
J Infect Dis. 2001 May 15;183(10):1494-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2001
Author
H. Jakobsen
B C Adarna
D. Schulz
R. Rappuoli
I. Jonsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Landspitali-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2001 May 15;183(10):1494-500
Date
May-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - administration & dosage - genetics - pharmacology
Administration, Intranasal
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Toxins - administration & dosage - genetics - pharmacology
Enterotoxins - administration & dosage - genetics - pharmacology
Escherichia coli Proteins
Female
Glycoconjugates - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Immunoglobulin G - biosynthesis
Mice
Mutation
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - administration & dosage - immunology - pharmacology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Tetanus Toxoid - administration & dosage - immunology - pharmacology
Abstract
The antibody response to pneumococcal glycoconjugate (Pnc) was characterized by analyzing pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS)-- and protein carrier-specific IgG subclass profiles and their relationship. Mice were immunized intranasally (inl) or subcutaneously (sc) with Pnc with mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, LT-R72 and LT-K63, as mucosal adjuvants. Subcutaneous immunization with Pnc alone induced predominantly IgG1, whereas native PPS administered sc induced very low IgG titers that were exclusively of the IgG3 subclass. Compared with sc immunization with Pnc alone, inl immunization with Pnc and LT mutants induced significantly higher systemic IgG2a, IgG3, and IgA antibodies to both PPS and the carrier, whereas the IgG1 titers were comparable. There also was a significant correlation between PPS- and protein carrier--specific antibody responses for all IgG subclasses. This demonstrates that LT mutants can be used to both enhance and modulate the antibody response to the PS moiety of glycoconjugate vaccines.
PubMed ID
11319685 View in PubMed
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92 records – page 1 of 10.