Skip header and navigation

Refine By

436 records – page 1 of 44.

A 20-year prospective study of mortality and causes of death among hospitalized opioid addicts in Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87156
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bjornaas Mari A
Bekken Anette S
Ojlert Aasa
Haldorsen Tor
Jacobsen Dag
Rostrup Morten
Ekeberg Oivind
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, N-0407 Oslo, Norway. mabjornaas@gmail.com
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Male
Mathematical Computing
Narcotics - poisoning
Neoplasms - mortality
Opioid-Related Disorders - mortality - rehabilitation
Overdose - mortality - prevention & control
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Street Drugs - poisoning
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To study mortality rate and causes of death among all hospitalized opioid addicts treated for self-poisoning or admitted for voluntary detoxification in Oslo between 1980 and 1981, and to compare their mortality to that of the general population. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted on 185 opioid addicts from all medical departments in Oslo who were treated for either self-poisoning (n = 93, 1980), voluntary detoxification (n = 75, 1980/1981) or both (n = 17). Their median age was 24 years; with a range from 16 to 41, and 53% were males. All deaths that had occurred by the end of 2000 were identified from the Central Population Register. Causes of death were obtained from Statistics Norway. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for mortality, in general, and in particular, for different causes of death. RESULTS: During a period of 20 years, 70 opioid addicts died (37.8%), with a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) equal to 23.6 (95% CI, 18.7-29.9). The SMR remained high during the whole period, ranging from 32.4 in the first five-year period, to 13.4 in the last five-year period. There were no significant differences in SMR between self-poisonings and those admitted for voluntarily detoxification. The registered causes of death were accidents (11.4%), suicide (7.1%), cancer (4.3%), cardiovascular disease (2.9%), other violent deaths (2.9%), other diseases (71.4%). Among the 50 deaths classified as other diseases, the category "drug dependence" was listed in the vast majority of cases (37 deaths, 52.9% of the total). SMRs increased significantly for all causes of death, with the other diseases group having the highest SMR; 65.8 (95% CI, 49.9-86.9). The SMR was 5.4 (95% CI, 1.3-21.5) for cardiovascular diseases, and 4.3 (95% CI, 1.4-13.5) for cancer. The SMR was 13.2 (95% CI, 6.6-26.4) for accidents, 10.7 (95% CI, 4.5-25.8) for suicides, and 28.6 (95% CI, 7.1-114.4) for other violent deaths. CONCLUSION: The risk of death among opioid addicts was significantly higher for all causes of death compared with the general population, implying a poor prognosis over a 20-year period for this young patient group.
PubMed ID
18271956 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Nov 1;131(21):2122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2011
Author
Jørgen G Bramness
Siren Haugland
Author Affiliation
Senter for rus og avhengighetsforskning, Universitetet i Oslo, Norway. j.g.bramness@medisin.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Nov 1;131(21):2122-5
Date
Nov-1-2011
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Butyrolactone - metabolism - poisoning
Citric Acid Cycle
Drug Overdose - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Sodium Oxybate - poisoning
Solvents - poisoning
Street Drugs - poisoning
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - diagnosis
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is naturally present in the human body, but may also be used as an intoxicating drug. Information from several sources has suggested its increased availability and use in Norway. There have also been reports of an increasing use of the chemical precursor gamma-butyrolactone (GBL).There is currently a need for knowledge on symptoms, addictiveness and overdoses, as well as targeted preventive measures.
The article is based on a discretionary selection of articles resulting from a literature search in PubMed, as well as reports from Norwegian and European authorities and research institutions.
An intake of small amounts of GHB produces an intoxicating effect, whereas higher doses can result in poisoning. Deaths have been reported. The effect may be variable, due to a steep dose-response curve and interaction with alcohol and other intoxicants. Treatment of poisoning is symptomatic and supportive. Treatment of abstinence is also supportive, while delirium may be treated as delirium tremens.
Preventive measures should be tailored specifically to potential user-groups.
PubMed ID
22048208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to the Internet among drinkers, smokers and illicit drug users: is it a barrier to the provision of interventions on the World Wide Web?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168991
Source
Med Inform Internet Med. 2006 Mar;31(1):53-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
John A Cunningham
Peter L Selby
Kypros Kypri
Keith N Humphreys
Author Affiliation
School of Medical Practice and Population Health, University of Newcastle, Toronto, Ontario, CA. John.Cunningham@camh.net
Source
Med Inform Internet Med. 2006 Mar;31(1):53-8
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Female
Humans
Internet
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Smoking
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
Expanding Internet-based interventions for substance use will have little benefit if heavy substance users are unlikely to have Internet access. This paper explored whether access to the Internet was a potential barrier to the provision of services for smokers, drinkers and illicit drug users.
As part of a general population telephone survey of adults in Ontario, Canada, respondents were asked about their use of different drugs and also about their use of the Internet.
Pack-a-day smokers were less likely (48%) to have home Internet access than non-smokers (69%), and current drinkers (73%) were more likely to have home access than abstainers (50%). These relationships remained true even after controlling for demographic characteristics. Internet access was less clearly associated with cannabis or cocaine use.
Even though there is variation in access among smokers, drinkers and illicit drug users, the World Wide Web remains an excellent opportunity to potentially provide services for substance abusers who might never access treatment in person because, in absolute terms, the majority of substance abusers do use the Internet.
PubMed ID
16754367 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acrylfentanyl: Another new psychoactive drug with fatal consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292003
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2017 Aug; 277:e21-e29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Davide Guerrieri
Emma Rapp
Markus Roman
Gunilla Thelander
Robert Kronstrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, 58758 Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: davide.guerrieri@rmv.se.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2017 Aug; 277:e21-e29
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage - blood - poisoning
Chromatography, Liquid
Drug Overdose
Female
Fentanyl - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood - poisoning
Forensic Toxicology
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Middle Aged
Nasal Sprays
Opioid-Related Disorders - blood - mortality
Street Drugs - blood - poisoning
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The European Nordic Countries are the most exposed to opioid-related deaths. Between April and October 2016, a series of forty lethal intoxications occurred in Sweden, in which the presence of the synthetic opioid acrylfentanyl was determined to be the main - or a contributing - cause of death. In the reported cases, the blood concentration of acrylfentanyl - mostly detected in combination with other drugs - ranged from 0.01ng/g to 5ng/g; victims were predominantly males (34 males and 6 females), and their age varied between 18 and 53 years. We further describe five cases, representative of the different drug administration route (nasal spray, tablets) and intentions (accidental or voluntary intoxication). Moreover, we address nine cases of non-lethal intoxication, in single (8 cases) or polydrug scenario (1 case). We discuss the present characteristics of the Swedish drug market for fentanyl-analogs in general and acrylfentanyl in particular, reporting a structural difficulty to effectively counteracting the appearance of unscheduled substances due to the constant turnover of new molecules on the recreational drug market.
PubMed ID
28587915 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute poisonings treated in hospitals in Oslo: a one-year prospective study (II): clinical outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93789
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Jan;46(1):42-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Heyerdahl Fridtjof
Bjornas Mari A
Hovda Knut Erik
Skog Karina
Opdahl Anders
Wium Cecilie
Ekeberg Oivind
Jacobsen Dag
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. fridtjof.heyerdahl@medisin.uio.no
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Jan;46(1):42-9
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidotes - therapeutic use
Coma - chemically induced
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Flumazenil - therapeutic use
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Naloxone - therapeutic use
Norway
Poisoning - epidemiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Street Drugs - poisoning
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The changing pattern of acute poisoning may affect complications and outcome in these patients. An update study on acute poisonings was therefore performed and compared to similar data from 1980. DESIGN. A prospective cross-sectional multi-center study of all adult patients (> or = 16 years) hospitalized in Oslo with a main diagnosis of acute poisoning, irrespective of intention, over a one-year period. RESULTS. Of 947 admissions, 222 (23%) were comatose. Complications were observed in 173 (18%), slightly reduced from 1980 (22%). Ten (1.1%) died and six (0.6%) got permanent sequelae, of which seven and five were drug- or alcohol-related, respectively. Seventy-five percent received treatment besides observation; 39% received antidotes, increased from 21% in 1980, most frequently flumazenil (23%) and naloxone (14%). CONCLUSIONS. In-hospital mortality in poisoned patients remained low, few patients entailed complications, and most patients survived without permanent sequelae. Drug- and alcohol-abuse related poisonings were most severe.
PubMed ID
18167036 View in PubMed
Less detail

ADHD in adult psychiatry. Minimum rates and clinical presentation in general psychiatry outpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91338
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):64-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Nylander L.
Holmqvist M.
Gustafson L.
Gillberg C.
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Clinic, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. lena.nylander@skane.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):64-71
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Personality Assessment
Questionnaires
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence and comorbidity of persisting attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adult psychiatric outpatients. Consecutive patients, first visits excluded, at a general psychiatric outpatient clinic were offered a screening for childhood ADHD with the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS). One hundred and forty-one patients out of 398 (35%) completed and returned the scale. Patients above or near cut-off for ADHD (n=57) were offered an extensive clinical evaluation with psychiatric as well as neuropsychological examination. The attrition was analysed regarding age, sex and clinical diagnoses. Out of the screened sample, 40% had scores indicating possible childhood ADHD. These 57 patients were invited to the clinical part of the study, but 10 declined assessment, leaving 47 (37 women and 10 men) who were actually examined. Thirty of these (21 women and nine men) met diagnostic criteria for ADHD at the time of examination. Among the patients with ADHD, affective disorders were the most common psychiatric diagnoses. The rate of alcohol and/or substance abuse, as noted in the medical records, was also high in the ADHD group. In the WURS-screened group, 22% (30 patients assessed as part of this study and one person with ADHD previously clinically diagnosed) were shown to have persisting ADHD. Therefore, it is clearly relevant for psychiatrists working in general adult psychiatry to have ADHD in mind as a diagnostic option, either as the patient's main problem or as a functional impairment predisposing for other psychiatric disorders.
PubMed ID
18991159 View in PubMed
Less detail

Administration mode bias in a school survey on alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11419
Source
Addiction. 1995 Apr;90(4):555-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
T. Bjarnason
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Institute for Educational Research, Reykjavík.
Source
Addiction. 1995 Apr;90(4):555-9
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Street Drugs
Students
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology
Abstract
School surveys have become the most common method for determining the general level of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use among adolescents in a large number of countries. The two most commonly applied field procedures in school surveys are teachers' and researchers' administration of questionnaires. The impact of the difference between these two modes of administration has not been determined, although it has been argued that central involvement of teachers in data collection may decrease the perceived anonymity of the survey among students, and should thus be avoided. In a split-half random sample of 3017 urban, Icelandic 16-20-year-old students, no statistically significant differences were found in reported use of licit or illicit drugs, nor in the stated willingness to be honest between these two modes of administration. These results suggest that when students return their responses in sealed envelopes, the two modes of administration produce equally valid results.
PubMed ID
7773118 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent drug sellers: trends, characteristics and profiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222804
Source
Br J Addict. 1992 Nov;87(11):1561-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
R G Smart
E M Adlaf
G W Walsh
Author Affiliation
Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Br J Addict. 1992 Nov;87(11):1561-70
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking
Canada
Cannabis
Designer Drugs
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency
Life Style
Male
Ontario
Prevalence
Schools
Social Problems - statistics & numerical data - trends
Street Drugs - classification
Students
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
This study examines drug selling among representative samples of high school students in Ontario. It involves three approaches, (i) examining the trend in drug selling between 1983 and 1989, (ii) assessing differences between sellers and non-sellers on demographic characteristics, levels of alcohol and drug use, and problems, and (iii) drawing detailed profiles of drug seller types. Drug selling declined considerably between 1983 and 1989. Sellers were more likely to be males and to use alcohol and drugs more often than non-sellers. Sellers also had more alcohol and drug problems and engaged in more delinquent acts. Drug sellers who sold cannabis only were less frequent users of drugs, less likely to have drug problems, and were also delinquent.
PubMed ID
1458035 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent health: a rural community's approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174863
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2005 Apr-Jun;5(2):366
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jean N Groft
Brad Hagen
Nancy K Miller
Natalie Cooper
Sharon Brown
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. jngroft.gs@alumni.ucalgary.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2005 Apr-Jun;5(2):366
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Alberta
Body Image
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Exercise
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Questionnaires
Rural health services - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Smoking
Street Drugs
Students - psychology
Abstract
Significant health problems encountered in adulthood often have their roots in health behaviours initiated during adolescence. In order to reverse this trend, school and health personnel, as well as parents and other community members working with high school students, need to be aware of the health-related beliefs and choices that guide the behaviours of teenagers. Although a wide variety of research has been conducted on this topic among urban adolescents, less is known about the health beliefs and behaviors of adolescents residing in rural areas, particularly in Canada. In general, rural Canadians are less healthy than their urban counterparts. Building on the knowledge and understanding of their own community, key stakeholders were invited to engage in the design and implementation of a participatory action research project aimed at understanding and improving the health of rural adolescents.
A group of parents, teachers, students, school administrators and public health nurses engaged in a participatory action research project to better understand determinants of the health of rural adolescents at a high school in Western Canada. Group members developed and administered a health survey to 288 students from a small rural high school, in an effort to identify areas of concern and interest regarding health practices and beliefs of rural adolescents, and to take action on these identified concerns.
Results indicated some interesting but potentially worrying trends in this population. For example, while frequent involvement in a physical activity was noted by 75.9% of participants, close to half of the females (48%) described their body image as 'a little overweight' or 'definitely overweight', and approximately 25.8% of respondents noted that they skipped meals most of the time. Differences between the genders were apparent in several categories. For example, more girls smoked (16.2%) than boys (12.3%), and more males (55.0%) than females (41%) had tried illegal drugs. Participants indicated awareness of other health-compromising behaviours, including unsafe driving habits and high stress levels, and acknowledged several steps they wanted to take to improve their health, as well as the barriers to taking those steps. Students identified improved nutrition, stress reduction, and increased levels of physical activity as particular important health goals. Students also recommended ways in which information and support could be provided within the school environment to enable them to achieve their health-related goals. Several activities developed in collaboration with students have incorporated the recommendations, and have spawned other activities in response to the ongoing identification of new concerns.
The process of including the rural community in the identification of health assets and needs from the perspective of students -- as well as the planning and implementation of appropriate strategies to address those needs -- demonstrates the strengths inherent within a small rural population. Community members' awareness of the need to create a healthy environment for youth is reflected in their willingness to participate in activities leading to improved health. Greater awareness of the health needs of rural adolescents, and of the influence of gender in some aspects of health behaviors, will help researchers to explore ways in which the unique culture of rural communities can be harnessed to help shape health-focused interventions.
PubMed ID
15885025 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent initiation into drug-taking behavior: comparisons over a 5-year interval.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6195
Source
Int J Addict. 1991 Mar;26(3):267-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
B. Segal
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska, Anchorage.
Source
Int J Addict. 1991 Mar;26(3):267-79
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health education
Humans
Incidence
Male
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Acquisition curves for six substances were compared for adolescents in two samples separated by a 5-year interval. Individual variations in initiation ages were found for different substances, but the general pattern of exposures to drugs was essentially stable over the time interval. The findings suggest that there appears to be a range of first experience with drugs that extends from 13 to 16 years. Special emphasis was given to the implications which the findings have for education and intervention programs, and for further research.
PubMed ID
1889925 View in PubMed
Less detail

436 records – page 1 of 44.