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Source
Alaska Native Health Career Program records, Archives and Special Collections, Consortium Library, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
1977
  1 website  
Source
Alaska Native Health Career Program records, Archives and Special Collections, Consortium Library, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Health care
Health education
Children
Dentistry
Physicians
Nurses
Healing
Storytelling
Teachers
Notes
To view this film, please go to the following link: https://youtu.be/2dbvhbyNe8M. This 20-minute educational film depicts a fictional Alaska Native classroom in which two youths learn about traditional medicine, community health aides, visiting hospitals outside of the village, and the importance of going to the dentist and the optometrist.
Online Resources
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Land based experiential indigenous culture and health training

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100844
Source
Page 523 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Jong, M
Author Affiliation
Memorial University
Source
Page 523 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Culturally safe care
Health of indigenous peoples
Health training
Innu
Land based experiential learning
Storytelling
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 13. Building Health Services Resources and Research Capacity.
Documents
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The value of Inuit elders' storytelling to health promotion during times of rapid climate changes and uncertain food security

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282720
Source
Chapter 9, Indigenous Peoples' food systems & well-being, pp. 140-157
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2013
141Indigenous Peoples’ food systems & well-being Chapter 9 The value of Inuit elders’ storytelling to health promotion during times of rapid climate change and uncertain food security v graCE m. EgElanD1 v sEnnait yOHannEs1 v lOOEE OKaliK2 v JOnaH KilaBuK3 v CassanDra raCiCOt1 v
  1 document  
Author
Egeland, GM
Yohannes, S
Okalik, L
Kilabuk, J
Racicot, C
Wilcke, M
Kuluguqtuq, J
Kisa, S
Source
Chapter 9, Indigenous Peoples' food systems & well-being, pp. 140-157
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Baffin Region
Canada
Canadian Arctic
Elders
Health promotion
Nunavut
Nutrition
Stories
Storytelling
Traditional food
Youth survey
Abstract
The ongoing nutrition transition in the Canadian Arctic is resulting in an epidemiologic transition towards the emergence of obesity and obesity-related chronic diseases. In response, the community of Pangnirtung in the Baffin Region of Nunavut, Canada, in partnership with the Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, developed a community health promotion project in two phases. The first phase involved collecting health behavior data from adults (2005) and youth (2006), and recording and transcribing elders??? stories on the value of traditional food, including plants and remedies (2006 to 2007). In the second phase, the health behaviour survey data and storytelling were used to help develop an innovative pilot intervention in the community (2008 onwards). The intervention aimed to increase knowledge about traditional food and nutrition and improve nutritional health behaviours through the age-old Inuit tradition of storytelling. It targeted youth and young adults because of community members' concerns that youth were consuming more high-sugar drinks and "junk food" and less traditional food than older adults in the community. The youth survey found that youth had consumed an average of 1.4 litres of sweet drinks a day, including two cans of pop, over the previous month. It also found that only five traditional food species had been consumed by more than 80 percent of the youth over the previous year, and that youth had a strong preference for caribou meat, with 98.7 percent of them consuming caribou in the past year, at an average of 87.2 g per day among consumers. No other traditional food was consumed to the same degree. Elders' stories were incorporated into a DVD promoting knowledge and appreciation of a wide range of traditional foods. The stories were also incorporated with modern nutritional health advice for youth radio drama programmes aimed at reducing the high consumption of pop in the community. The DVD and radio programmes have already been pilot tested for effectiveness, cultural relevance and acceptability, and a broader community-wide evaluation of the community radio???s nutritional health promotion is currently taking place. In addition, elders' storytelling revealed elders' perceptions of climate change and its impacts on local flora and fauna, and their resulting concerns for the sustainability of subsistence food species. With climate change now outpacing projections, and potentially threatening favoured subsistence species, elders' storytelling can be a means of building youths' awareness and appreciation of the full range of traditional food available and increasing the diversity of traditional foods consumed. Elders' storytelling also provides opportunities for understanding changes in a historical context and, when combined with modern-day nutrition issues and modern media, may be a means of reaching youth, building social cohesion and promoting Inuit resiliency in a time of rapid climate change and uncertain food security.
Documents

IndigenousPeoplesFoodSystemsCh9.pdf

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