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Age of gastric cancer patients and susceptibility to chronic gastritis in their relatives. A mathematical approach using Poisson's process and scoring of gastritis state.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254992
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1973;8(7):673-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

The effect of a single BRCA2 mutation on cancer in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19014
Source
J Med Genet. 2002 Jul;39(7):457-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
H. Tulinius
G H Olafsdottir
H. Sigvaldason
A. Arason
R B Barkardottir
V. Egilsson
H M Ogmundsdottir
L. Tryggvadottir
S. Gudlaugsdottir
J E Eyfjord
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Cancer Society, Reykjavik, Iceland University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. hrafnt@krabb.is
Source
J Med Genet. 2002 Jul;39(7):457-62
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Breast Neoplasms, Male - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Female
Founder Effect
Genes, BRCA2
Humans
Iceland
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Linkage (Genetics) - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of malignant diseases in families of probands with the same mutation in the BRCA2 gene. DESIGN: A cohort study using record linkage of a breast cancer family resource and the Icelandic Cancer Registry. SETTING: Iceland. SUBJECTS: Families of 995 breast cancer patients, from which 887 were tested for a single founder 999del5 mutation; 90 had the mutation and 797 did not. RESULTS: Relatives of probands with the mutation had significantly increased relative risk (RR) of breast cancer. For first degree relatives, the RR was 7.55 (95% CI 6.04 to 9.03) but was 1.72 (95% CI 1.49 to 1.96) in first degree relatives of probands without the mutation. For prostate and ovarian cancer, the first and second degree relatives of probands with the mutation had a significantly increased RR, but in families of probands without the mutation no significant familial risk was found. CONCLUSIONS: The 999del5 mutation in the BRCA2 gene explains a substantial proportion of familial risk of breast cancer in Iceland, but significant familial risk remains in relatives of probands without the mutation. For prostate and ovarian cancer, the mutation accounts for most of the familiality observed in families of breast cancer patients.
PubMed ID
12114473 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of intestinal and diffuse types of gastric carcinoma: a time-trend study in Finland with comparison between studies from high- and low-risk areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218716
Source
Cancer. 1994 Mar 1;73(5):1533
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1994
Author
A. Amorosi
D. Palli
Source
Cancer. 1994 Mar 1;73(5):1533
Date
Mar-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Notes
Comment On: Cancer. 1993 May 15;71(10):2926-338490820
PubMed ID
8111723 View in PubMed
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Familial risk for gastric carcinoma: an updated study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78200
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Apr 23;96(8):1272-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-23-2007
Author
Hemminki K.
Sundquist J.
Ji J.
Author Affiliation
Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institute, 141 83 Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Apr 23;96(8):1272-7
Date
Apr-23-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardia
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Reliable data on familial risks are important for clinical counselling and cancer genetics. However, the estimates of familial risk of gastric cancer vary widely. We examined the risk of familial gastric cancer using the updated Swedish Family-Cancer Database with 5358 patients among offspring and 36,486 patients among parents. There were 133 families with one parent and one offspring diagnosed with gastric cancer, and 20 families with two affected offspring. Familial standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were 1.63 and 2.93 when parents and siblings presented with gastric cancer, respectively. The high sibling risk was owing to cancer in the corpus (SIR 7.28). The SIR for cardia cancer was 1.54 when parents were diagnosed with any gastric cancer. Cardia cancer associated with oesophageal cancer, particularly with oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Among specific histologies, signet ring cancer showed an increase. A few associations were noted for discordant sites, including the urinary bladder and the endometrium. H. pylori infection, although not measured in the present study, is probably an important risk factor for the high sibling risk of corpus cancer. Familial clustering of cardia cancer is independent of H. pylori infection, and may have a genetic basis. The familial association of cardia cancer with oesophageal adenocarcinoma may provide aetiological clues.
PubMed ID
17406355 View in PubMed
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Family study of gastric carcinoma; With special reference to histological types.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249159
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl. 1978;50:3-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978

[Genetic analysis of stomach cancer and precancerous states].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242520
Source
Genetika. 1983;19(2):316-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
B A Al'tshuler
Source
Genetika. 1983;19(2):316-22
Date
1983
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Female
Gastritis - genetics
Genetic markers
Humans
Male
Moscow
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology - genetics
Phenotype
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - genetics
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System - genetics
Risk
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
This report is devoted to the genetic study of stomach cancer within the limits of classic and multiple models. Also, analysis of phenotypic and genetic correlations in the system of stomach cancer--pre-cancer and that of the association of this disease with genetic markers were conducted. The reliable dependence of the development of stomach cancer on genetic factors is shown and its genetic stipulation with individual forms of ulcer disease and gastritic is determined. The problem of their genetic heterogeneity has been discussed based on these findings. The values of recurrence risk of the development of stomach cancer in population of Moscow and those of the expressivity of connection of ulcer disease forms and stomach cancer with genetic variants of the ABO and Rhesus systems were obtained.
PubMed ID
6403408 View in PubMed
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[Genetic analysis of the gastric precancer-cancer system. I. Research in different populations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26433
Source
Genetika. 1986 Jan;22(1):146-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1986
Author
B A Al'tshuler
V V Bridko
Source
Genetika. 1986 Jan;22(1):146-52
Date
Jan-1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Age Factors
Comparative Study
Disease Susceptibility
English Abstract
Genetics, Population
Humans
Middle Aged
Moscow
Phenotype
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - genetics
Risk
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Stomach Ulcer - genetics
Ukraine
Urban Population
Abstract
Heredity predisposition was analysed in cancer and precancer stomach diseases in distinct populations. Some phenotypic and genetic characters of the stomach "precancer--cancer" system were studied. Similarity in the degree of stomach cancer inheritance, its segregation frequency and recurrent risk was revealed for populations. However, the degree of correlation between cancer and precancer stomach disease was different in distinct populations, this being more pronounced in "cancer--gastric ulcer" system.
PubMed ID
3949155 View in PubMed
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Genetic epidemiologic aspects of gastric cancer in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18952
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2002 Aug;195(2):181-6; discussion 186-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Albert Kjartansson Imsland
Bjarki Jónsson Eldon
Sturla Arinbjarnarson
Valgargur Egilsson
Hrafn Tulinius
Laufey Tryggvadóttir
Reynir Arngrímsson
Jónas Magnússon
Author Affiliation
Iceland Genomics Corporation, Reykjavik.
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2002 Aug;195(2):181-6; discussion 186-7
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Association between gastric cancer and environmental factors (diet and infections) has been established, and genetic changes are well described in adenocarcinomas of the stomach. Less is known about clinical features of hereditary gastric cancer and whether the disease is associated with family clustering. STUDY DESIGN: Family trees of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer in Iceland between 1955 and 1999 were identified in the Genealogical Database of the University of Iceland. All probands with age of onset younger than 60 years were used in the study. Families of all probands (n = 455 men and 161 women) were traced to third degree. Through linkage of the genealogic data obtained by the Icelandic Cancer Registry (between 1955 and 1999), all reported cancers were identified in those families. The expected number of cases was calculated using age-specific population rates in Iceland. RESULTS: A relative risk (RR) of 2.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6-3.0) and 1.3 (95% CI = 1.0-1.7) for the gastric cancer risk was observed among 2,846 first- and 8,658 second-degree relatives of male probands. For female probands the corresponding relative risks were 1.6 (95% CI = 1.1-2.6, n = 7,396) and 1.4 (95% CI = 0.9-2.0, n = 2,764). The increased risk was more pronounced for relatives of men and women diagnosed with gastric cancer before the age of 50 years. A minor difference in relative risk was found between relatives of probands who were diagnosed with intestinal type or diffuse type gastric cancer. Fifty-eight families with two or more relatives with cancer were identified. In 32 families 2 relatives with gastric cancer were identified and in 26 families 3 or more relatives had gastric cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Relatives of gastric cancer patients have two- to three-fold increased risk of developing gastric cancer. The risk is elevated for both genders.
PubMed ID
12168964 View in PubMed
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Interleukin 1-beta gene polymorphisms and risk of gastric cancer in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91117
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2009;44(3):339-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Persson Christina
Engstrand Lars
Nyrén Olof
Hansson Lars-Erik
Enroth Helena
Ekström Anna-Mia
Ye Weimin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Christina.Persson@ki.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2009;44(3):339-45
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Female
Genotype
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection stimulates the production of interleukin (IL)-1 beta, a pro-inflammatory cytokine and suppressor of gastric acid secretion. As both inflammation and hypochlorhydria, which might facilitate proximal colonization of H. pylori and other bacterial species alike, have been implicated in gastric carcinogenesis, much attention has been directed to functional genetic polymorphisms that affect the production of IL-1 beta. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of these polymorphisms. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We analysed a population-based, case-control study in 5 Swedish counties and a hospital-based, case-control study conducted in 8 Swedish hospitals, with a total of 351 gastric cancer cases and 539 controls. The IL1B-31, IL1B-511 and IL1B+3954 biallelic polymorphisms were genotyped using pyrosequencing. The variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism of IL1-RN was analysed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by gel electrophoresis. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, derived from unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: The risk of gastric cancer was unrelated to genotype in all of the studied polymorphic loci, and the absence of any association was confirmed in both the population-based and hospital-based case-control studies. Analyses confined to histological subtypes (intestinal or diffuse) and site-specific tumours (cardia or distal stomach), as well as analyses stratified by H. pylori infection status and family history of gastric cancer, did not reveal any significant increases or decreases in risk. CONCLUSION: Our results do not lend support to the hypothesis that human genetic polymorphisms related to the production of IL-1 beta are associated with the risk of gastric cancer.
PubMed ID
19031173 View in PubMed
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KIT mutations in Russian patients with mucosal melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130748
Source
Melanoma Res. 2011 Dec;21(6):555-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Svetlana N Abysheva
Aglaya G Iyevleva
Nina V Efimova
Yulia B Mokhina
Feruza A Sabirova
Alexandr O Ivantsov
Anna S Artemieva
Alexandr V Togo
Vladimir M Moiseyenko
Dmitry E Matsko
Evgeny N Imyanitov
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, N.N. Petrov Institute of Oncology, St Petersburg Pediatric Medical Academy, St Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Melanoma Res. 2011 Dec;21(6):555-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
DNA Mutational Analysis - methods
Gene Frequency
Head and Neck Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Humans
Melanoma - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Mucous Membrane - metabolism - pathology
Mutation - physiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Urogenital Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Abstract
A single institution series of 48 mucosal melanomas (MMs) has been analyzed for the presence of KIT mutations using high-resolution melting and sequencing of abnormally melted DNA fragments. The analysis of exons 9, 11, 13, and 17 has revealed eight of 48 (17%) nonsynonymous alterations, including zero of seven head and neck, six of 24 anorectal, one of 15 genitourinary, one of one gastric, and zero of one mediastinal MMs. Seven of these mutations were potentially associated with the tumor sensitivity to KIT tyrosine kinase inhibitors. One tumor harbored somatically acquired silent nucleotide substitution c.1383A>G (T461T). This study adds to the evidence that a substantial portion of MMs carry a therapeutically relevant mutation in the KIT oncogene.
PubMed ID
21971089 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.