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Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and/or gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234796
Source
Cancer. 1987 Sep 1;60(5):1094-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1987
Author
W C MacDonald
J B MacDonald
Source
Cancer. 1987 Sep 1;60(5):1094-8
Date
Sep-1-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Alcohol Drinking
Barrett Esophagus - pathology
Canada - ethnology
Cardia - pathology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Smoking
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
One hundred twenty-nine adenocarcinomas involving the esophagus and/or gastric cardia differed significantly from 212 cancers of the rest of the stomach as follows: male-female ratio, 6:1 versus 2:1, birth outside Canada, US or UK, 12% versus 34%; parent or sibling with gastric cancer, 5% versus 13%; previous duodenal ulcer, 23% versus 9%; chronic reflux symptoms, 25% versus 3%; hiatal hernia, 51% versus 11%. Of the 129 esophagocardia cancers, 24 involved the esophagus alone, 48 the cardia and esophagus, 33 the cardia alone or cardia and fundus, and 24 the upper stomach and lower esophagus extensively. Thirty-four were associated with Barrett's esophagus. The 72 patients with involvement of both the upper stomach and lower esophagus (48 cardia and esophagus, 24 extensive) were identical with the esophagocardia group as a whole. The 24 patients with esophageal cancer and the 34 with Barrett's epithelium were the same clinically as the whole esophagocardia group except more had chronic reflux and hiatal hernia. The 33 patients with cancer confined to the cardia or cardia and fundus resembled the whole esophagocardia group but did not have Barrett's esophagus. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagocardia region is probably a different disease from cancer of the rest of the stomach.
PubMed ID
3607726 View in PubMed
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Aetiological parallel between anal cancer and cervical cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24733
Source
Lancet. 1991 Sep 14;338(8768):657-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-1991
Author
M. Melbye
P. Sprøgel
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Lancet. 1991 Sep 14;338(8768):657-9
Date
Sep-14-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma in Situ - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
It has been postulated that an infectious agent and/or specific sexual behaviour is involved in the aetiology of anal cancer, in analogy with the aetiology established for cancer of the cervix. A case-control study of 29,648 women with cancers registered in the Danish Cancer Registry during 1968-87 tested the hypothesis that anal cancer patients were more likely than patients with colon, stomach, or vulva cancer to have had a previous diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or invasive cervical cancer. The odds ratio of CIN, adjusted for age and year of diagnosis, for anal vs colon cancer was 5.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.3-8.3), that for anal vs stomach cancer 3.6 (2.1-6.0), and that for anal vs vulva cancer 1.6 (0.9-2.9). The median time from diagnosis of CIN to diagnosis of the registered cancer was 151 months for anal, 112 months for vulva, 114 months for colon, and 126 months for stomach cancer. The association with previous invasive cervical cancer was also investigated; no patient with cervical cancer in this second analysis had been included in the CIN analysis. The odds ratios were similar. In addition, anal cancer patients were significantly more likely to have had cervical cancer than were patients with vulva cancer (odds ratio 1.8 [1.0-3.9]). The strong association between anal cancer and CIN/invasive cervical cancer suggests that these cancers share common risk factors. The association is at least as strong as that between cervical and vulva cancer.
PubMed ID
1679474 View in PubMed
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Age and sex distribution of intestinal type and diffuse gastric carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24916
Source
APMIS. 1991 Jan;99(1):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1991
Author
C W Janssen
H. Maartmann-Moe
R T Lie
R. Matre
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
APMIS. 1991 Jan;99(1):78-82
Date
Jan-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
A twelve-year series of 375 patients with gastric carcinoma has been studied. Primary tumours were classified as intestinal type (58%) or diffuse (26%), whereas 16% were unclassifiable. The relative age and sex incidence rates of intestinal type and diffuse gastric carcinoma were estimated using the age and sex distribution of individuals in Norway as the basis for calculation. There was no difference in the rates of diffuse gastric carcinoma between the sexes. On the other hand, the rate of men with intestinal type carcinoma was more than twice as high as that of women. This difference was consistent within each age group from adolescence to senescence. The findings indicate that Laurén's two types of gastric carcinoma are aetiologically different. The rates of both types increased with age up to the 70-79 age group, whereas the rates in octogenarians tended to be lower than in septuagenarians. A comparison of our data with the data of incidence of gastric cancer in Norway indicates that some of the older patients do not come for surgery.
PubMed ID
1993119 View in PubMed
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Age of gastric cancer patients and susceptibility to chronic gastritis in their relatives. A mathematical approach using Poisson's process and scoring of gastritis state.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254992
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1973;8(7):673-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16521
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
C. Jansson
N. Plato
A L V Johansson
O. Nyrén
J. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Catarina.Jansson@meb.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Epidemiologic Methods
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. METHODS: In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. CONCLUSIONS: Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to contribute to the increasing incidence or the male predominance.
PubMed ID
16421388 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, smoking and risk of gastric cancer: case-control study from Moscow, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198346
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Apr;11(4):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
D. Zaridze
E. Borisova
D. Maximovitch
V. Chkhikvadze
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Carcinogenesis, Russian Cancer Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Apr;11(4):363-71
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Adenosquamous - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Case-Control Studies
Female
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To examine the risk of gastric cancer associated with alcohol consumption and smoking in men and women in Moscow, Russia.
A case-control study which includes 448 cases and 610 controls was conducted. Cases consisted of patients with newly diagnosed histologically confirmed gastric cancer. Controls were patients admitted during the study period to the hospital with diagnoses other than cancer and/or gastrointestinal diseases. Information on demographic variables, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet was collected from all subjects. Venous blood was drawn from 361 cases and 441 controls. A serological test for Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G was performed.
Alcohol consumption, particularly vodka consumption, was found to increase the risk of gastric cancer. In men the effect of hard liquor drinking was stronger for cancer of the cardia (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.2-10.2), while in women the effect was stronger for cancer of sites other than gastric cardia (OR = 1.5, CI = 1.0-2.3). Smoking increased the risk of developing gastric cancer in men, but not in women. In men a dose-response relationship between mean number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = 0.03), pack-years of cigarettes smoked (p = 0.01) and duration of smoking (p = 0.08) and the risk of cancer of gastric cardia was observed. Further statistical analysis revealed interactions between effect of smoking and alcohol consumption and between smoking and H. pylori infection status.
The findings further support the role of alcohol consumption and smoking in the etiology of gastric cancer.
PubMed ID
10843447 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic beverage consumption and gastric cancer risk: a prospective population-based study in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80058
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jan 15;120(2):373-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2007
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Giovannucci Edward
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Jan 15;120(2):373-7
Date
Jan-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between alcohol consumption and risk of gastric cancer remains controversial. Moreover, prospective data on the role of alcoholic beverage type are sparse. We prospectively investigated the association between total alcohol (ethanol) intake as well as specific alcoholic beverages and risk of gastric cancer in the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based cohort of 61,433 women. Alcohol intake and other dietary exposures were assessed at baseline (1987-1990) and again in 1997 using a food-frequency questionnaire. Incident gastric cancer cases were ascertained through the Swedish Cancer Register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During 966,807 person-years of follow-up, through June 2005, 160 incident cases of gastric cancer occurred. Total alcohol intake was not significantly associated with risk of gastric cancer. Compared with nondrinkers, the multivariate HR of gastric cancer for women with an alcohol intake of 40 g or more per week was 1.33 (95% CI, 0.79-2.25). Consumption of medium-strong/strong beer was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of gastric cancer; the multivariate HR for women who consumed more than one serving of medium-strong/strong beer per week (median, 2.5 drinks/week) was 2.09 (95% CI, 1.11-3.93; p-trend = 0.02) compared with no consumption. Consumption of light beer, wine, and hard liquor was not significantly associated with gastric cancer risk. Our findings suggest that constituents of beer other than alcohol may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer.
PubMed ID
17066442 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of correlations of the incidence of stomach cancer and anthropogenic factors of environmental pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231834
Source
Sov Med. 1989;(10):58-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989

An assay for selecting high risk population for gastric cancer by studying environmental factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27898
Source
Neoplasma. 1976;23(3):333-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
G. Málnási
S. Jakab
A. Incze
A. Apostol
J M Csapó
E. Szabó
J J Csapó
K. Jakab
Source
Neoplasma. 1976;23(3):333-41
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Environment
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Food
Geology
Humans
Male
Probability
Risk
Romania
Sex Factors
Sodium Chloride - analysis
Soil - analysis
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Water - analysis
Abstract
Gastric cancer mortality incidence data registered in two different areas of Eastern Transylvania (Roumania) were reported related to 325,000 inhabitants from the period of 1951-1972. The findings were compared to some geographical environmental factors deriving from an area of 13,300 km with 905,700 inhabitants. A 2-3.5 times larger incidence of gastric cancer (75-140 per 100,000/year) was found in some selected geographical areas of the intermontane depressions of Gheorgheni and Ciuc in comparison to hilly area of Transylvanian Tableland. The difference might be explained by some unknown environmental gastric cancer risk factors. Of the natural factors, the presence of magmatic substrata shows a significant degree of correlation. The main pedological factor seems to be badly drained pseudoglyied podzolic and peaty soils of low pH and high content of organic matter. Sofs drinking waters also may be involved as risk factor. High altitude, cold climate determining a restricted assortiment of cultivated plants, the successive production of vegetal and animal food on the same soil for livelong periods and several generations, especially in isolated rural areas, seem to represent gastric cancer risk factors. According to authors' opinion a survey of the high-risk population selected on the basis of the environmental factors, especially of the persons suffering from gastric disorders considered today possible precursors of gastric cancer, may offer some progress in detecting early gastric malignancy in the future.
PubMed ID
958535 View in PubMed
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275 records – page 1 of 28.