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375 records – page 1 of 38.

2-year clinical outcomes after implantation of sirolimus-eluting, paclitaxel-eluting, and bare-metal coronary stents: results from the WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89935
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2009
Author
Kaltoft Anne
Jensen Lisette Okkels
Maeng Michael
Tilsted Hans Henrik
Thayssen Per
Bøttcher Morten
Lassen Jens Flensted
Krusell Lars Romer
Rasmussen Klaus
Hansen Knud Nørregaard
Pedersen Lars
Johnsen Søren Paaske
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Thuesen Leif
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. annekaltoft@stofanet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Date
Feb-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Paclitaxel
Sirolimus
Stents - adverse effects
Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This registry study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2 types of drug-eluting stents (DES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), compared with bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Drug-eluting stents may increase the risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: A total of 12,395 consecutive patients with coronary intervention and stent implantation recorded in the Western Denmark Heart Registry from January 2002 through June 2005 were followed up for 2 years. Data on death and MI were ascertained from national medical databases. We used Cox regression analysis to control for confounding. RESULTS: The 2-year incidence of definite ST was 0.64% in BMS patients, 0.79% in DES patients (adjusted relative risk [RR]: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 1.65), 0.50% in SES patients (adjusted RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.35 to 1.15), and 1.30% in PES patients (adjusted RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.94). The incidence of MI was 3.8% in BMS-treated patients, 4.5% in DES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.51), 4.1% in SES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.47), and 5.3% in PES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.81). Whereas overall 2-year adjusted mortality was similar in the BMS and the 2 DES stent groups, 12- to 24-month mortality was higher in patients treated with PES (RR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.09). Target lesion revascularization was reduced in both DES groups. CONCLUSIONS: During 2 years of follow-up, patients treated with PES had an increased risk of ST and MI compared with those treated with BMS and SES. Mortality after 12 months was also increased in PES patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):665-619232898
PubMed ID
19232897 View in PubMed
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2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
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7,528 patients treated with PCI--a Scandinavian real-life scenario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160536
Source
Cardiology. 2008;110(2):96-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Sune Pedersen
Søren Galatius
Jan Bech
Erik Jørgensen
Kari Saunamaki
Steffen Helqist
Jan Skov Jensen
Henning Kelbaek
Jan Kyst Madsen
Author Affiliation
Cardiac Catheterisation Laboratory, Heart Clinic, Copenhagen, Denmark. sunped01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Cardiology. 2008;110(2):96-105
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Stents - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Analyze clinical, temporal and procedural characteristics from 7,528 consecutive percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in one of the largest published contemporary European PCI-database during a 6-year period.
Retrospective study design.
1998-2004. Temporal and referral changes in a Danish PCI-registry were analyzed. Demographic and angiographic variables were compared with data from randomized clinical trials, US-registries and current guidelines.
22,214 patients were examined with coronary angiography and 7,528 patients were treated with PCI. The annual number of PCI's increased by 15%. Over time, the fraction of patients with risk factors increased, median age increased from 61 to 64 years and the coronary pathology was significantly worsened. ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients primarily admitted to hospitals without facilities for primary angioplasty, were less likely to receive primary PCI. Baseline-data were in general in par with randomized clinical trial study populations and large-scale US data-registries. Interestingly, 14% of all PCI-procedures were performed on patients with a clinical presentation, for which coronary artery bypass grafting would be recommended by guidelines.
PCI is performed in an increasingly sicker population, but generally in accordance with randomized trials and similar to US tradition. However, 14% were treated with PCI even though coronary artery bypass grafting was recommended by guidelines.
PubMed ID
17971658 View in PubMed
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A 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcome of everolimus-eluting versus sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in patients with diabetes mellitus (the DiabeDES IV randomized angiography trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275976
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Michael Maeng
Arvydas Baranauskas
Evald Høj Christiansen
Anne Kaltoft
Niels Ramsing Holm
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - mortality - radiography
Coronary Stenosis - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Thrombosis - mortality - radiography
Denmark
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality - radiography - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents
Everolimus - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - radiography
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Risk factors
Sirolimus - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We aimed to compare angiographic and clinical outcomes after the implantation of everolimus-eluting (EES) and sirolimus-eluting (SES) stents in patients with diabetes.
There are limited data on long-term outcome after EES vs SES implantation in diabetic patients.
We randomized 213 patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease to EES (n?=?108) or SES (n?=?105) implantation. Angiographic follow-up was performed 10 months after the index procedure and all patients were followed clinically for 4 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss at 10-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, the need for target lesion revascularization (TLR) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, or TLR) at 4-year follow-up.
At 10-month angiographic follow-up, in-stent late lumen loss was 0.20?±?0.53 mm and 0.11?±?0.49 mm (P?=?0.28), and angiographic restenosis rate was 3.8% and 5.2% (P?=?0.72) in the EES and SES groups, respectively. At 4-year clinical follow-up, MACE had occurred in 22 (20.4%) patients in the EES group and 25 (23.8%) patients in SES group (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.47-1.49; P?=?0.55), with TLR performed in 6 (5.6%) and 10 (9.5%) patients in the two groups (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.21-1-58; P?=?0.28).
EES and SES had comparable 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
PubMed ID
25640050 View in PubMed
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The AAA with a challenging neck: outcome of open versus endovascular repair with standard and fenestrated stent-grafts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88967
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Chisci Emiliano
Kristmundsson Thorarinn
de Donato Gianmarco
Resch Timothy
Setacci Francesco
Sonesson Björn
Setacci Carlo
Malina Martin
Author Affiliation
Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Unit, University of Siena, Italy. e.chisci@gmail.com
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - radiography - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Female
Humans
Italy
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the outcome of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) versus conventional open repair (OR) in patients with a short, angulated or otherwise challenging proximal neck. METHODS: The definition of a challenging proximal neck was based on diameter (>or=28 mm), length (or=60 degrees ), shape (reverse tapered or bulging), and thrombus lining (>50%). Between January 2005 and December 2007, 187 consecutive patients (159 men; mean age 73 years, range 48-92) operated for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were identified as having challenging proximal neck morphology. Of these, 61 patients were treated with OR at center I (group A), 71 with standard EVAR (group B; 45 center I, 29 center II) and 52 with fenestrated EVAR (group C) at center II. Clinical examination and computed tomography were performed at 1 month and yearly thereafter. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between groups A, B, and C regarding primary technical success rate, 30-day mortality, or late AAA-related mortality. The mean length of follow-up was 19.5 months (range 0-40). Freedom from reintervention at 3 years was 91.8%, 79.7%, and 82.7% for groups A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.042). The only statistically significant difference between standard and fenestrated EVAR was a higher incidence of late sac expansion [9 (12.2%) versus 1 (1.9%), p = 0.036] in the standard stent-graft group. Reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR (p = NS), but open reinterventions were more common after OR. Reinterventions after EVAR were related to the presence of an angulated (p = 0.039) or short neck (p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: The results of EVAR and OR were similar for AAAs with a challenging proximal neck. Endovascular reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR, particularly in patients with an angulated or short neck. Open reinterventions were more common after OR. More patients and long-term data are needed to confirm these findings.
Notes
Comment In: J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):147-819456195
PubMed ID
19456190 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic aneurysm: endovascular grafts offer a potential alternative to surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191802
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 1998 Jan;(2):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 1998 Jan;(2):1-3
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - economics - methods
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Direct Service Costs
Humans
Stents
Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive - adverse effects - economics - methods
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Endovascular grafts are a new, experimental surgery for AAAs that alleviates the need for open abdominal surgery. They offer an important alternative for high risk patients who would be at a greater risk with the more invasive surgical procedure. However, this is based on limited evidence, and more randomized controlled trials are needed. The procedure may be cheaper than open surgery, because of the lengthy hospital stay and operating room time with the latter, provided that the costs of the devices are low enough. However, there is insufficient data on the outcomes with endovascular grafts in different patient groups. As with many new or minimally invasive techniques, there is a "learning curve" which will affect costs and outcomes. Endovascular grafting is no exception, and repeated practical applications are needed for competence, expertise and good outcomes. Continued monitoring of this technique is needed. A registry of elective AAA patients now has 10-year follow-up data on about a third of the Canadian patients operated on in 1988. Further development of such registries will provide more accurate information on success rates, costs, and long-term complications.
PubMed ID
11811206 View in PubMed
Less detail

The adverse long-term impact of renal impairment in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the drug-eluting stent era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146521
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug;2(4):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Clare E Appleby
Joan Ivanov
Shahar Lavi
Karen Mackie
Eric M Horlick
Douglas Ing
Christopher B Overgaard
Peter H Seidelin
Rüdiger von Harsdorf
Vladimír Dzavík
Author Affiliation
Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug;2(4):309-16
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - instrumentation
Biological Markers - blood
Chronic Disease
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - complications - mortality - radiography - therapy
Creatinine - blood
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Heart Diseases - etiology - mortality
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
An observational study determining the long-term impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary cardiac referral center. CKD is associated with poor in-hospital outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention, but its effect beyond 1 year, particularly in the drug-eluting stent (DES) era, has not been reported.
Baseline creatinine was available for 11,953 patients entered into a prospective registry (April 2000 to September 2007). Patients were stratified: those with or without at least moderate CKD (creatinine clearance,
PubMed ID
20031733 View in PubMed
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[Advisability of biliary drainage in liver fragments reconstruction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279323
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2016;(9):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Semenkov
E F Kim
A V Filin
D S Burmistrov
A V Metelin
Yu R Kamalov
T N Galyan
A V Goncharova
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2016;(9):4-12
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anastomosis, Surgical - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Anastomotic Leak - epidemiology - prevention & control
Biliary Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Biliary Tract Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods
Decompression, Surgical - methods
Drainage - methods
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Retrospective Studies
Stents
Abstract
to estimate the effect of decompressive stented drainage of biliary anastomosis on incidence of biliary complications.
294 patients aged from 5 months to 61 years (mean 13.8±0.81) were enrolled. They underwent liver fragments transplantation in the Department of Liver Transplantation of Petrovsky Russian Research Center of Surgery for the period from March 1997 to January 2016. Decompressive stented drainage tubes were used in 28 (9.5%) patients. Reconstruction without drainage was applied in 266 (90.5%) cases. In the group of biliobiliary reconstruction drainage was used in 18 out of 89 cases (20.2%), in the group of biliodigestive reconstruction - in 10 out of 202 cases (4.9%). Incidence of specific biliary complications was assessed.
There was significant direct correlation of stented drainage of biliodigestive anastomosis with various biliary complications including bile leakage (r= -0,1253; p=0.06), obturation of anastomosis (r=0.045; p=0.501), stricture of anastomosis (r= -0.0665; p=0.320), other strictures of intrahepatic bile ducts (r= -0.0291; p=0.664), hepatolithiasis (r=0.0857; p=0.199). However significant direct correation was observed between stented drainage and incidence of intrahepatic bile ducts strictures (r=0.2117; p=0.046) and anastomosis obturation (r=0.2330; p=0.028) in case of biliobiliary reconstruction. Significant correation with other biliary complications was absent (p>0.05).
Unconstrained stented drainage during primary biliary reconstruction is associated with increased incidence of biliary complications and should not be indicated routinely. Clear need for drainage should be determined in further investigations.
PubMed ID
27723689 View in PubMed
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Anatomic feasibility of endovascular reconstruction in aortic arch aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261905
Source
Vascular. 2015 Feb;23(1):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
B. Sonesson
M. Landenhed
N. Dias
T. Kristmundsson
R. Ingemansson
B. Koul
M. Malina
T. Resch
Source
Vascular. 2015 Feb;23(1):17-20
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Thoracic - radiography - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic - diagnosis - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - instrumentation
Elective Surgical Procedures
Endovascular Procedures - instrumentation
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prosthesis Design
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - instrumentation
Stents
Sweden
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose was to estimate the proportion of current open aortic arch reconstructions that might be feasible for endovascular repair. From all elective repair made in Southern Sweden in one center between 2005 and 2012, 129 open and eight endovascular aortic arch repairs were identified. The anatomy of the ascending arch and descending aorta as well as the arch vessels was categorized from multiplanar and axial computed tomography scans. Of 129 open cases, only two (1.5%) were suitable for endovascular repair. Among 137 all arch open and endovascular arch reconstructions performed during the study period, only 10 (7%) were candidates for endovascular repair. The most common exclusion for endovascular repair was an excessively large ascending aortic diameter. In conclusion, only a small proportion of patients having an open arch repair are suitable for endovascular arch repair, a finding related to the large diameter of the ascending aorta.
PubMed ID
24621558 View in PubMed
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375 records – page 1 of 38.