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78 records – page 1 of 8.

Air-insulated clothing for specific naval purposes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57341
Source
Proc R Soc Med. 1969 Mar 3;62(3):277-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-1969
Author
J D Walters
Source
Proc R Soc Med. 1969 Mar 3;62(3):277-83
Date
Mar-3-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clothing
Cold Climate
Humans
Hypothermia - prevention & control
Male
Naval Medicine
Steam
Tropical Climate
Ventilation
PubMed ID
5768358 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An epidemic of molluscum contagiosum originating in an out-door public swimming-pool. An analysis of 125 consecutive cases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43219
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1973 Oct 1;135(40):2151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1973

Association between sauna bathing and fatal cardiovascular and all-cause mortality events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264229
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2015 Apr;175(4):542-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Tanjaniina Laukkanen
Hassan Khan
Francesco Zaccardi
Jari A Laukkanen
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2015 Apr;175(4):542-8
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Coronary Disease - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Steam Bath - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Sauna bathing is a health habit associated with better hemodynamic function; however, the association of sauna bathing with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality is not known.
To investigate the association of frequency and duration of sauna bathing with the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), fatal coronary heart disease (CHD), fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD), and all-cause mortality.
We performed a prospective cohort study (Finnish Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study) of a population-based sample of 2315 middle-aged (age range, 42-60 years) men from Eastern Finland. Baseline examinations were conducted from March 1, 1984, through December 31, 1989.
Frequency and duration of sauna bathing assessed at baseline.
During a median follow-up of 20.7 years (interquartile range, 18.1-22.6 years), 190 SCDs, 281 fatal CHDs, 407 fatal CVDs, and 929 all-cause mortality events occurred. A total of 601, 1513, and 201 participants reported having a sauna bathing session 1 time per week, 2 to 3 times per week, and 4 to 7 times per week, respectively. The numbers (percentages) of SCDs were 61 (10.1%), 119 (7.8%), and 10 (5.0%) in the 3 groups of the frequency of sauna bathing. The respective numbers were 89 (14.9%), 175 (11.5%), and 17 (8.5%) for fatal CHDs; 134 (22.3%), 249 (16.4%), and 24 (12.0%) for fatal CVDs; and 295 (49.1%), 572 (37.8%), and 62 (30.8%) for all-cause mortality events. After adjustment for CVD risk factors, compared with men with 1 sauna bathing session per week, the hazard ratio of SCD was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.57-1.07) for 2 to 3 sauna bathing sessions per week and 0.37 (95% CI, 0.18-0.75) for 4 to 7 sauna bathing sessions per week (P for trend =?.005). Similar associations were found with CHD, CVD, and all-cause mortality (P for trend =.005). Compared with men having a sauna bathing session of less than 11 minutes, the adjusted hazard ratio for SCD was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.67-1.28) for sauna bathing sessions of 11 to 19 minutes and 0.48 (95% CI, 0.31-0.75) for sessions lasting more than 19 minutes (P for trend =?.002); significant inverse associations were also observed for fatal CHDs and fatal CVDs (P for trend =.03) but not for all-cause mortality events.
Increased frequency of sauna bathing is associated with a reduced risk of SCD, CHD, CVD, and all-cause mortality. Further studies are warranted to establish the potential mechanism that links sauna bathing and cardiovascular health.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA Intern Med. 2015 Apr;175(4):54825706401
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2015 May;12(5):25725781412
PubMed ID
25705824 View in PubMed
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Source
Am J Med. 2001 Feb 1;110(2):118-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2001
Author
M L Hannuksela
S. Ellahham
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu (MLH), University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Med. 2001 Feb 1;110(2):118-26
Date
Feb-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Cardiovascular physiology
Child
Female
Hormones - blood
Humans
Lung - physiology
Male
Rheumatic Diseases - physiopathology
Skin Physiology
Steam Bath - adverse effects - standards
Abstract
Although sauna bathing causes various acute, transient cardiovascular and hormonal changes, it is well tolerated by most healthy adults and children. Sauna bathing does not influence fertility and is safe during the uncomplicated pregnancies of healthy women. Some studies have suggested that long-term sauna bathing may help lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension and improve the left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with chronic congestive heart failure, but additional data are needed to confirm these findings. The transient improvements in pulmonary function that occur in the sauna may provide some relief to patients with asthma and chronic bronchitis. Sauna bathing may also alleviate pain and improve joint mobility in patients with rheumatic disease. Although sauna bathing does not cause drying of the skin-and may even benefit patients with psoriasis-sweating may increase itching in patients with atopic dermatitis. Contraindications to sauna bathing include unstable angina pectoris, recent myocardial infarction, and severe aortic stenosis. Sauna bathing is safe, however, for most people with coronary heart disease with stable angina pectoris or old myocardial infarction. Very few acute myocardial infarctions and sudden deaths occur in saunas, but alcohol consumption during sauna bathing increases the risk of hypotension, arrhythmia, and sudden death, and should be avoided.
PubMed ID
11165553 View in PubMed
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Source
Duodecim. 2009;125(13):1407-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Virve Koljonen
Author Affiliation
Töölön sairaala, plastiikkakirurgian klinikka Helsingin palovammakeskus, HUS.
Source
Duodecim. 2009;125(13):1407-13
Date
2009
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amputation
Burns - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Necrosis
Rhabdomyolysis - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Risk factors
Steam Bath - adverse effects
Surgical Flaps
Abstract
Burn injuries caused by hot air sauna burns constitute a Finnish burn rarity. The patients are usually middle-aged men having passed out on the sauna benches under the influence of alcohol. Sauna air causes a deep injury penetrating all layers of the skin, accompanied with necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and consequent rhabdomyolysis. The initially harmless-looking erythema of the skin rapidly transforms into a third-degree burn. Therapy includes the prevention of kidney damage and surgery. Local flaps are recommended for the treatment of tissue defects caused by destruction of deep tissues and amputations.
PubMed ID
19678496 View in PubMed
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Cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death and the Finnish sauna bath.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249014
Source
Adv Cardiol. 1978;25:73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978

[Chromomycosis in Finland. The possible role of the Finnish sauna in its spreading].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111605
Source
Hautarzt. 1966 Nov;17(11):507-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1966

Combined Effect of Sauna Bathing and Cardiorespiratory Fitness on the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Deaths in Caucasian Men: A Long-term Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295274
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2018 Mar - Apr; 60(6):635-641
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Author
Jari A Laukkanen
Tanjaniina Laukkanen
Hassan Khan
Maira Babar
Setor K Kunutsor
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland; Central Finland Health Care District, Jyväskylä, Finland. Electronic address: jariantero.laukkanen@uef.fi.
Source
Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2018 Mar - Apr; 60(6):635-641
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - therapy
Cohort Studies
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Exercise - physiology
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Steam Bath - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Both cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and frequency of sauna bathing (FSB) are each strongly and independently associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD) risk. However, the combined effect of CRF and FSB on SCD risk has not been previously investigated. We evaluated the joint impact of CRF and FSB on the risk of SCD in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease prospective cohort study of 2291 men aged 42-61?years at recruitment. Objectively measured CRF and self-reported sauna bathing habits were assessed at baseline. CRF was categorized as low and high (median cutoffs) and FSB as low and high (defined as =2 and 3-7 sessions/week respectively). Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for SCD. During a median follow-up of 26.1?years, 226 SCDs occurred. Comparing high vs low CRF, the HR (95% CIs) for SCD in analysis adjusted for several established risk factors was 0.48 (0.34-0.67). Comparing high vs low FSB, the corresponding HR was 0.67 (0.46-0.98). Compared to men with low CRF & low FSB, the multivariate-adjusted HRs of SCD for the following groups: high CRF & high FSB; high CRF & low FSB; and low CRF & high FSB were 0.31 (0.16-0.63), 0.49 (0.34-0.70), and 0.71 (0.45-1.10) respectively. In a general male Caucasian population, the combined effect of high aerobic fitness (as measured by CRF) and frequent sauna baths is associated with a substantially lowered risk of future SCD compared with high CRF or frequent sauna bathing alone.
PubMed ID
29551418 View in PubMed
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Control of typhus fever in Finland during World War II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143047
Source
Vesalius. 2009 Dec;15(2):71-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Helene Laurent
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Sciences History, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. helene.laurent@helsinki.fi
Source
Vesalius. 2009 Dec;15(2):71-9
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks - history - prevention & control
Finland
History, 20th Century
Humans
Military Medicine - history
Steam Bath - history
Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne - history - prevention & control
World War II
Abstract
The article describes the measures taken against the threat of typhus epidemic in Finland during the Second World War. Comparisons between countries at war and their different typhus prevention methods are made. The main method of typhus prevention in Finland consisted of regular sauna bathing, which was culturally acceptable and very efficient when combined with heating of the clothing. The Finnish troops remained virtually louse-free by ecological and traditional methods, and thus the spread of typhus fever in the army could be prevented.
PubMed ID
20527325 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.