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Adolescent smoking and exposure to tobacco marketing under a tobacco advertising ban: Findings from 2 Norwegian national samples

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67227
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
  1 website  
Author
Braverman, MT
Aarø, LE
Author Affiliation
Department of Human and Community Development, University of California, Davis 95616, USA. mtbraverman@ucdavis.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Advertising - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Female
Friends - psychology
Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marketing - organization & administration
Mass Media
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Norway - epidemiology
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Tobacco Industry - organization & administration
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined the extent to which adolescents in Norway have been exposed to tobacco marketing despite an existing ban, and whether exposure is related to their current smoking or expectations they will smoke in the future. METHODS: Questionnaires were administered to nationally representative systematic samples of Norwegian youths aged 13 to 15 years in 1990 (n = 4282) and 1995 (n = 4065). RESULTS: About half in each cohort reported exposure to marketing. Youths reporting exposure were significantly more likely to be current smokers and to expect to be smokers at 20 years of age, after control for important social influence predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents' current smoking and future smoking expectations are linked to marketing exposure even in limited settings, suggesting the need for comprehensive controls to eliminate the function of marketing in promoting adolescent smoking.
PubMed ID
15226148 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Air ambulance services in the Arctic 1999-2009: a Norwegian study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300739
Source
International Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2011 Jan 27;4:1. doi: 10.1186/1865-1380-1-1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Norum J
Elsbak TM
Source
International Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2011 Jan 27;4:1. doi: 10.1186/1865-1380-1-1.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air ambulance
Statistics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Air ambulance services in the Arctic have to deal with remote locations, long distances, rough weather conditions and seasonable darkness. Despite these challenges, the people living in the area expect a high quality of specialist health care. AIMS: The objective of this study was to analyse the air ambulance operations performed in the Norwegian Arctic and study variations in diagnoses and flight patterns around the year. METHODS: A retrospective analysis. All air ambulance operations performed during the time 1999 - 2009 period were analysed. The subjects were patients transported and flights performed. The primary outcome measures were patients' diagnoses and task patterns around the year. RESULTS: A total of 345 patients were transported and 321 flights performed. Coronary heart and vascular disease, bone fractures and infections were the most common diagnoses. Most patients (85%) had NACA score 3 or 4. Half of all fractures occurred in April and August. Most patients were males (66%), and one fourth was not Norwegian. The median flying time (one way) was 3 h 33 m. Ten percent of the flights were delayed, and only 14% were performed between midnight and 8.00 AM. The period April to August was the busiest one (58% of operations). CONCLUSIONS: Norway has run a safe air ambulance service in the Arctic for the last 11 years. In the future more shipping and polar adventure operations may influence the need for air ambulances, especially during summer and autumn.
PubMed ID
21407997 View in PubMed
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Associations between vitamins A and E and legacy POP levels in highly contaminated Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302431
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2013 Jan 1;442:445-54. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.10.012. Epub 2012 Nov 24.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Molde K
Ciesielski TM
Fisk AT
Lydersen C
Kovacs KM
Sørmo EG
Jenssen BM
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2013 Jan 1;442:445-54. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.10.012. Epub 2012 Nov 24.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Environmental monitoring
Female
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Greenland
Male
Norway
Organic Chemicals
Blood
toxicity
Sharks
Vitamin A
Vitamin E
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Abstract
The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) is a top predator in Arctic marine ecosystems, and the species bioaccumulates high levels of biomagnifying persistent organic pollutants (POP). In teleost fish, as well as in marine mammals and seabirds, legacy POP have been shown to interfere with the vitamin A and vitamin E homeostasis. Thus, there is the potential for negative health effects from these legacy compounds in Greenland sharks. In the present study we examined associations among plasma levels of legacy POP and plasma vitamin A (retinol [RET], retinyl palmitate [RPA]) and vitamin E (a-tocopherol [a-TOC]) in Greenland sharks from Svalbard, Norway. Plasma levels of POP were on average higher than the hepatic levels previously reported in Greenland sharks from Iceland and Davis Strait, Canada. Levels were also higher than the plasma levels reported in Arctic marine mammals. DDTs (mean 8,069 ng/g l.w., range: 900-59,707 ng/g l.w.), PCBs (mean 5,766 ng/g l.w., range 1344-16,106 ng/g l.w.) and chlordanes (mean 1,551 ng/g l.w., range: 323-5,756 ng/g l.w.) had the highest concentrations among the POP groups studied. There were significant inverse relationships between RET concentrations and the concentrations of the dioxin-like compounds PCB-118 and PCB-156/171, and the non-dioxin-like compounds PCB-99 and PCB-128. There were also significant inverse relationships between RPA and 18 of the 38 POP compounds measured. Furthermore, there were significant positive associations between a-TOC and 13 of the 27 PCB congeners. The study suggests that these vitamin systems can be affected by the relatively high POP concentrations exhibited by Greenland sharks at Svalbard. However, the present study is correlative and thus the potential interplay between POP and vitamin dynamics of Greenland sharks must be interpreted cautiously, pending further research on this issue among elasmobranchs.
PubMed ID
23183125 View in PubMed
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Childhood diet in relation to Sámi and Norwegian ethnicity in northern and mid-Norway--the SAMINOR study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302228
Source
Public Health Nutrition. 2008 Feb;11(2):168-75.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Brustad M
Parr CL
Melhus M
Lund E
Source
Public Health Nutrition. 2008 Feb;11(2):168-75.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet
Emigration and Immigration
Feeding Behavior
Ethnology
Female
Humans
Inuits
statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this work was to identify dietary patterns in the past using cluster analysis of reported diet in childhood, and to assess predictors for dietary patterns in relation to ethnicity in the population in the Sámi core areas in Norway. The Sámis are an indigenous population living in the border areas of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia.
DESIGN: Population-based, cross-sectional study, using self-administered questionnaires. A food-frequency questionnaire covering selected food items eaten in childhood was used. The questionnaire also provided data on ethnicity.
SUBJECTS AND SETTING: This study was based on data collected from 7614 subjects participating in The Population Based Study of Health and Living Conditions in Areas with a Mixed Sámi and Norwegian Population (the SAMINOR study) who grew up in the SAMINOR geographical areas, i.e. areas with mixed Sámi and Norwegian populations in Norway.
RESULTS: Four dietary clusters were identified: a reindeer meat cluster; a cluster with high intakes of fish, traditional fish products and mutton, in addition to food sources from the local environment; a Westernised food cluster with high intakes of meat balls and sausages; and a cluster with a high intake of fish, but not any other foods in the questionnaire. The cluster distribution differed by ethnicity, but the effect of ethnicity on diet differed by coastal and inland residence.
CONCLUSION: Our study has shown that data gathered through the limited questionnaire could be used to group the study sample into different dietary clusters, which we believe will be useful for further research on relationships between diet in childhood and health in the Sámi core areas in Norway.
PubMed ID
17610754 View in PubMed
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Chronic neurological diseases in a newly established department of neurology and a department of rehabilitation medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102490
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 1965;13 Pt 2:433-5.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1965

Commentary on Pedersen and Skardhamar (2010): does cannabis use predict non-drug offending?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98356
Source
Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):119-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
David P Farrington
Author Affiliation
Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK. dpf1@cam.ac.uk
Source
Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):119-20
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection - standards
Humans
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Dropouts
Young Adult
Notes
RefSource: Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):109-18
PubMed ID
20078465 View in PubMed
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Differences between Arctic and Atlantic fjord systems on bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in zooplankton from Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302917
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2011 Jun 15;409(14):2783-95. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.03.015. Epub 2011 May 20.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Hallanger IG
Ruus A
Warner NA
Herzke D
Evenset A
Schøyen M
Gabrielsen GW
Borgå K
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2011 Jun 15;409(14):2783-95. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.03.015. Epub 2011 May 20.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Atlantic Ocean
Analysis
Metabolism
Chemistry
Chlordan
DDT
Environmental monitoring
Food chain
Hexachlorobenzene
Hexachlorocyclohexane
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated
Mirex
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Seawater
Svalbard
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Statistics & numerical data
Zooplankton
Abstract
Differences in bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) between fjords characterized by different water masses were investigated by comparing POP concentrations, patterns and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) in seven species of zooplankton from Liefdefjorden (Arctic water mass) and Kongsfjorden (Atlantic water mass), Svalbard, Norway. No difference in concentrations and patterns of POPs was observed in seawater and POM; however higher concentrations and BAFs for certain POPs were found in species of zooplankton from Kongsfjorden. The same species were sampled in both fjords and the differences in concentrations of POPs and BAFs were most likely due to fjord specific characteristics, such as ice cover and timing of snow/glacier melt. These confounding factors make it difficult to conclude on water mass (Arctic vs. Atlantic) specific differences and further to extrapolate these results to possible climate change effects on accumulation of POPs in zooplankton. The present study suggests that zooplankton do biomagnify POPs, which is important for understanding contaminant uptake and flux in zooplankton, though consciousness regarding the method of evaluation is important.
PubMed ID
21600630 View in PubMed
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Differences in perceived coercion at admission to psychiatric hospitals in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302355
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Mar;41(3):241-7. Epub 2006 Jan 19.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Kjellin L
Høyer G
Engberg M
Kaltiala-Heino R
Sigurjónsdóttir M
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Mar;41(3):241-7. Epub 2006 Jan 19.
Date
2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Iceland
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female *
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: International variation in compulsory admissions to psychiatric care has mainly been studied in terms of civil commitment rates. The objectives of this study were to compare and analyse the levels of perceived coercion at admission to psychiatric in-patient care among the Nordic countries and between centres within these countries, in relation to legal prerequisites and clinical practice.
METHOD: From one to four centres each in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland and Sweden, a total of 426 legally committed and 494 formally voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed within 5 days from admission.
RESULTS: The proportion of committed patients reporting high levels of perceived coercion varied among countries (from 49% in Norway to 100% in Iceland), and in Sweden, only, among centres (from 29 to 90%). No clear variations in this respect were found among voluntary patients. A wide concept of coercion in the Civil Commitment Act and no legal possibility of detention of voluntary patients were associated to low levels of perceived coercion at admission among committed patients.
CONCLUSION: For committed patients, differences in national legal prerequisites among countries were reflected in differences in perceived coercion. The results from Sweden also indicate that local care traditions may account for variation among centres within countries.
PubMed ID
16424967 View in PubMed
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Disease-specific Hospitalizations Among 5-Year Survivors of Hepatoblastoma: A Nordic Population-based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302464
Source
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2019 Apr;41(3):181-186. doi: 10.1097/MPH.0000000000001378.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2019
Author
Bonnesen TG1
Asdahl PH
de Fine Licht S
Gudmundsdottir T
Holmqvist AS
Madanat-Harjuoja LM
Tryggvadottir L
Winther JF
Hasle AH
ALiCCS Study Group
Source
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2019 Apr;41(3):181-186. doi: 10.1097/MPH.0000000000001378.
Date
2019
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatoblastoma
Epidemiology
Therapy
Hospitalization
Statistics & numerical data
Humans
Liver Neoplasms
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms
Registries
Risk assessment
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Survivors
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The long-term risk of somatic disease in hepatoblastoma survivors has not been thoroughly evaluated in previous studies. In this population-based study of 86 five-year HB survivors, we used inpatient registers to evaluate the risk for a range of somatic diseases.
METHODS: In total, 86 five-year survivors of hepatoblastoma were identified in the Nordic cancer registries from 1964 to 2008 and 152,231 population comparisons were selected. Study subjects were followed in national hospital registries for somatic disease classified into 12 main diagnostic groups. Standardized hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) and absolute excess risks were calculated.
RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 11 years, 35 of the 86 five-year hepatoblastoma survivors had been hospitalized with a total of 69 hospitalizations, resulting in an RR of 2.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-3.5) and an overall absolute excess risk of 4.2 per 100 person-years. Highest risk was seen for benign neoplasms (RR=16) with 6 hospitalizations for benign neoplasms in the colon and one in rectum.
CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of hospitalizations found in this first comprehensive follow-up of hepatoblastoma survivors seems reassuring. Less than 50% of the 5-year survivors had been hospitalized and often for diseases that were not severe or life-threatening.
PubMed ID
30557167 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.