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Adolescent smoking and exposure to tobacco marketing under a tobacco advertising ban: Findings from 2 Norwegian national samples

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67227
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
  1 website  
Author
Braverman, MT
Aarø, LE
Author Affiliation
Department of Human and Community Development, University of California, Davis 95616, USA. mtbraverman@ucdavis.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Advertising - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Female
Friends - psychology
Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marketing - organization & administration
Mass Media
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Norway - epidemiology
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Tobacco Industry - organization & administration
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined the extent to which adolescents in Norway have been exposed to tobacco marketing despite an existing ban, and whether exposure is related to their current smoking or expectations they will smoke in the future. METHODS: Questionnaires were administered to nationally representative systematic samples of Norwegian youths aged 13 to 15 years in 1990 (n = 4282) and 1995 (n = 4065). RESULTS: About half in each cohort reported exposure to marketing. Youths reporting exposure were significantly more likely to be current smokers and to expect to be smokers at 20 years of age, after control for important social influence predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents' current smoking and future smoking expectations are linked to marketing exposure even in limited settings, suggesting the need for comprehensive controls to eliminate the function of marketing in promoting adolescent smoking.
PubMed ID
15226148 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Air ambulance services in the Arctic 1999-2009: a Norwegian study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300739
Source
International Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2011 Jan 27;4:1. doi: 10.1186/1865-1380-1-1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Norum J
Elsbak TM
Source
International Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2011 Jan 27;4:1. doi: 10.1186/1865-1380-1-1.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air ambulance
Statistics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Air ambulance services in the Arctic have to deal with remote locations, long distances, rough weather conditions and seasonable darkness. Despite these challenges, the people living in the area expect a high quality of specialist health care. AIMS: The objective of this study was to analyse the air ambulance operations performed in the Norwegian Arctic and study variations in diagnoses and flight patterns around the year. METHODS: A retrospective analysis. All air ambulance operations performed during the time 1999 - 2009 period were analysed. The subjects were patients transported and flights performed. The primary outcome measures were patients' diagnoses and task patterns around the year. RESULTS: A total of 345 patients were transported and 321 flights performed. Coronary heart and vascular disease, bone fractures and infections were the most common diagnoses. Most patients (85%) had NACA score 3 or 4. Half of all fractures occurred in April and August. Most patients were males (66%), and one fourth was not Norwegian. The median flying time (one way) was 3 h 33 m. Ten percent of the flights were delayed, and only 14% were performed between midnight and 8.00 AM. The period April to August was the busiest one (58% of operations). CONCLUSIONS: Norway has run a safe air ambulance service in the Arctic for the last 11 years. In the future more shipping and polar adventure operations may influence the need for air ambulances, especially during summer and autumn.
PubMed ID
21407997 View in PubMed
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Childhood diet in relation to Sámi and Norwegian ethnicity in northern and mid-Norway--the SAMINOR study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302228
Source
Public Health Nutrition. 2008 Feb;11(2):168-75.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Brustad M
Parr CL
Melhus M
Lund E
Source
Public Health Nutrition. 2008 Feb;11(2):168-75.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet
Emigration and Immigration
Feeding Behavior
Ethnology
Female
Humans
Inuits
statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this work was to identify dietary patterns in the past using cluster analysis of reported diet in childhood, and to assess predictors for dietary patterns in relation to ethnicity in the population in the Sámi core areas in Norway. The Sámis are an indigenous population living in the border areas of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia.
DESIGN: Population-based, cross-sectional study, using self-administered questionnaires. A food-frequency questionnaire covering selected food items eaten in childhood was used. The questionnaire also provided data on ethnicity.
SUBJECTS AND SETTING: This study was based on data collected from 7614 subjects participating in The Population Based Study of Health and Living Conditions in Areas with a Mixed Sámi and Norwegian Population (the SAMINOR study) who grew up in the SAMINOR geographical areas, i.e. areas with mixed Sámi and Norwegian populations in Norway.
RESULTS: Four dietary clusters were identified: a reindeer meat cluster; a cluster with high intakes of fish, traditional fish products and mutton, in addition to food sources from the local environment; a Westernised food cluster with high intakes of meat balls and sausages; and a cluster with a high intake of fish, but not any other foods in the questionnaire. The cluster distribution differed by ethnicity, but the effect of ethnicity on diet differed by coastal and inland residence.
CONCLUSION: Our study has shown that data gathered through the limited questionnaire could be used to group the study sample into different dietary clusters, which we believe will be useful for further research on relationships between diet in childhood and health in the Sámi core areas in Norway.
PubMed ID
17610754 View in PubMed
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Chronic neurological diseases in a newly established department of neurology and a department of rehabilitation medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102490
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 1965;13 Pt 2:433-5.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1965

Commentary on Pedersen and Skardhamar (2010): does cannabis use predict non-drug offending?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98356
Source
Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):119-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
David P Farrington
Author Affiliation
Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK. dpf1@cam.ac.uk
Source
Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):119-20
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection - standards
Humans
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Dropouts
Young Adult
Notes
RefSource: Addiction. 2010 Jan;105(1):109-18
PubMed ID
20078465 View in PubMed
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Differences in perceived coercion at admission to psychiatric hospitals in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302355
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Mar;41(3):241-7. Epub 2006 Jan 19.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Kjellin L
Høyer G
Engberg M
Kaltiala-Heino R
Sigurjónsdóttir M
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Mar;41(3):241-7. Epub 2006 Jan 19.
Date
2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Iceland
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female *
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: International variation in compulsory admissions to psychiatric care has mainly been studied in terms of civil commitment rates. The objectives of this study were to compare and analyse the levels of perceived coercion at admission to psychiatric in-patient care among the Nordic countries and between centres within these countries, in relation to legal prerequisites and clinical practice.
METHOD: From one to four centres each in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland and Sweden, a total of 426 legally committed and 494 formally voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed within 5 days from admission.
RESULTS: The proportion of committed patients reporting high levels of perceived coercion varied among countries (from 49% in Norway to 100% in Iceland), and in Sweden, only, among centres (from 29 to 90%). No clear variations in this respect were found among voluntary patients. A wide concept of coercion in the Civil Commitment Act and no legal possibility of detention of voluntary patients were associated to low levels of perceived coercion at admission among committed patients.
CONCLUSION: For committed patients, differences in national legal prerequisites among countries were reflected in differences in perceived coercion. The results from Sweden also indicate that local care traditions may account for variation among centres within countries.
PubMed ID
16424967 View in PubMed
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Distribution of the blood groups of the Norwegian lapps.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43650
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1972 Mar;36(2):257-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1972

Effects of client and therapist ethnicity and ethnic matching

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286422
Source
Page 441 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Mollersen S.
Author Affiliation
The Sami National Centre for Mental Health (SANKS), Norway
Source
Page 441 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory
Care - utilization
Catchment Area (Health)
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 10. Mental Health and Wellness.
Documents
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Effects of client and therapist ethnicity and ethnic matching: a prospective naturalistic study of outpatient mental health treatment in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95308
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(3):246-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Møllersen Snefrid
Sexton Harold C
Holte Arne
Author Affiliation
Hospital of Kirkenes, PO Box 410, N-9915 Kirkenes, Norway. Snefrid.Mollersen@helse-finnmark.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(3):246-55
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Catchment Area (Health)
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
We explored the effects of ethnicity on mental health treatment in the population of North Norway that largely consists of indigenous Sami and non-Sami Norwegians. As the two groups are comparable in their socio-economics, ethnic effects can be separated from their most common confounders. The effect of client and therapist ethnicity and client-therapist ethnic match on treatment was examined among psychiatric outpatients in this setting. Client (n=335) and therapist (n=33) demographics and ethnicity were recorded prior to intake. Self-reported psychosocial distress was recorded at intake, termination and 20-month follow-up. Therapists reported their clinical assessment, treatment delivery at intake and discharge. The results indicated that therapist ethnicity was associated with the amount and type of service provided but improvement was not. Both the delivery of treatment and improvement did not differ significantly by client ethnicity. Ethnic matching was associated with greater symptomatic improvement in treatments of moderate duration.
PubMed ID
19034726 View in PubMed
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