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45972 records – page 1 of 4598.

1,3-Butadiene and leukemia among synthetic rubber industry workers: exposure-response relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166384
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Hong Cheng
Nalini Sathiakumar
John Graff
Robert Matthews
Elizabeth Delzell
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Ryals School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Birmingham, AL, USA. hcheng@ms.soph.uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens - chemical synthesis - chemistry - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Dimethyldithiocarbamate - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphoid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Rubber - adverse effects - chemical synthesis - chemistry
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous research updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers during the period 1944-1998, determined if leukemia and other cancers were associated with several employment factors and carried out Poisson regression analysis to examine exposure-response associations between estimated exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) or other chemicals and cancer. The present study used Cox regression procedures to examine further the exposure-response relationship between several unlagged and lagged, continuous, time-dependent BD exposure indices (BD parts per million (ppm)-years, the total number of exposures to BD concentrations >100 ppm ("peaks") and average intensity of BD) and leukemia, lymphoid neoplasms and myeloid neoplasms. All three BD exposure indices were associated positively with leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (beta) from an analysis that controlled only for age was 2.9 x 10(-4) (p
PubMed ID
17123495 View in PubMed
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[1,4 millions Swedes are on the donation registry. Still several thousands newly registered persons per month].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208386
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-1997
Author
H. Gäbel
N. Rehnqvist
B. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Transplantationskirurgiska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Date
May-28-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Public Opinion
Registries
Sweden
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9213668 View in PubMed
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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124775
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nilsson, J
Östling, S
Waern, M
Karlsson, B
SigstrÖm, R
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression.
During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V.
The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate.
While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities.
PubMed ID
22549369 View in PubMed
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The 1% of the population accountable for 63% of all violent crime convictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259131
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Falk, O
Wallinius, M
Lundström, S
Frisell, T
Anckarsäter, H
Kerekes, N
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Population-based studies on violent crime and background factors may provide an understanding of the relationships between susceptibility factors and crime. We aimed to determine the distribution of violent crime convictions in the Swedish population 1973-2004 and to identify criminal, academic, parental, and psychiatric risk factors for persistence in violent crime.
The nationwide multi-generation register was used with many other linked nationwide registers to select participants. All individuals born in 1958-1980 (2,393,765 individuals) were included. Persistent violent offenders (those with a lifetime history of three or more violent crime convictions) were compared with individuals having one or two such convictions, and to matched non-offenders. Independent variables were gender, age of first conviction for a violent crime, nonviolent crime convictions, and diagnoses for major mental disorders, personality disorders, and substance use disorders.
A total of 93,642 individuals (3.9%) had at least one violent conviction. The distribution of convictions was highly skewed; 24,342 persistent violent offenders (1.0% of the total population) accounted for 63.2% of all convictions. Persistence in violence was associated with male sex (OR 2.5), personality disorder (OR 2.3), violent crime conviction before age 19 (OR 2.0), drug-related offenses (OR 1.9), nonviolent criminality (OR 1.9), substance use disorder (OR 1.9), and major mental disorder (OR 1.3).
The majority of violent crimes are perpetrated by a small number of persistent violent offenders, typically males, characterized by early onset of violent criminality, substance abuse, personality disorders, and nonviolent criminality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24173408 View in PubMed
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A 1-year follow-up of prescribing patterns of analgesics in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224422
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 1992 Feb;17(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
R. Ahonen
H. Enlund
V. Pakarinen
S. Riihimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 1992 Feb;17(1):43-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analgesics
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - trends
Abstract
The prescription of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs (analgesics) was studied using computerized patient records from a Finnish health centre with a population base of some 27,000 inhabitants. A random sample of every fifth patient visiting the health centre in 1986 was chosen. This study sample consisted of 4,577 patients with 17,021 physician contacts and altogether 14,035 prescriptions during the 1-year follow-up: of these analgesics comprised 14.8%. The proportion of the study population who received at least one analgesic prescription was 23 +/- 1.2% (95% CI). The use of physician contacts as a base revealed 10.7 +/- 0.5% (95% CI) of the contacts with an analgesic prescription. The exposure to analgesics among males increased with age from 17% for those aged 15-34 years to 34% for those aged 75 years or more. Among women, exposure to analgesics increased from 17% (15-34 years) to 41% (75 years or more). Most of patients who received analgesic prescriptions were incidental users (one or two analgesic prescriptions per year). Only 4% of women and 3% of men were categorized as heavy users of analgesics (seven or more analgesic prescriptions per year). The proportion of heavy users increased with age and was highest in the oldest age-group (75 years or more). In order to make informed policy judgements about drug use in society, we need routine sales statistics and patient-specific drug-use data such as those presented in this paper.
PubMed ID
1548311 View in PubMed
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The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
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2-DE protein expression in endometrial carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80911
Source
Acta Oncol. 2006;45(6):685-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Caroline, L
Johanna, L
Susanne, B
Uwe, R
Kjell, S
Karolina, B
Bo, F
Britta, N
Gert, A
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecologic Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Institute of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. caroline.lundgren@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 2006;45(6):685-94
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma - metabolism
Cluster analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Endometrial Neoplasms - metabolism - pathology
Female
Gene Expression
Histocytochemistry
Humans
Neoplasm Proteins - metabolism
Ploidies
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore the protein expression pattern in normal endometrial mucosa (n = 5) and endometrial carcinoma (n = 15) of low (diploid) and high (aneuploid) malignancy potential by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The specimens were evaluated for histopathologic subtype, stage and grade in relation to DNA ploidy. A match-set consisting of five samples from normal endometrium, eight diploid and seven aneuploid tumours was created. All the diploid and three of the aneuploid tumours were of endometrioid subtype, while the remaining four were of uterine seropapillary type. There were 192 protein spots differentiating diploid tumours from normal endometrium and 238 protein spots were separating aneuploid tumours from normal endometrium (p
PubMed ID
16938811 View in PubMed
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[2 outbreaks of trichinelliasis in Rostov Province].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220244
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1993 Oct-Dec;(5):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Dotsenko
T I Tverdokhlebov
A A Shirinian
N G Barinova
A P Ordyntseva
S A Nagornyi
A V Markin
S Ia Verkholomova
E P Tikhomirova
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1993 Oct-Dec;(5):18-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mebendazole - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Trichinellosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Two epidemiologically unrelated outbreaks of trichinellosis were registered in Rostov Province in the November and December of 1984 with 16 patients in the Salsk District and 20 patients in Rostov-on-Don. The course of the disease was characterized by 6-20% of severe and 31-45% moderate forms, respectively. The source of the infection was pork that had not been controlled for Trichinella spiralis. Late diagnosis and inadequate treatment in one case led to a fatal outcome. Economic losses accounted for 490,000 rubles (as of 1985). In spite of energetic prophylaxis measures, the situation in the Rostov Province continues to be serious. In 1989-1992, eighteen cases of trichinellosis were registered in the Salsk District again.
PubMed ID
8127264 View in PubMed
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45972 records – page 1 of 4598.