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76 records – page 1 of 8.

The abortion issue in Newfoundland: a province divided.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235319
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Apr 15;136(8):865-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1987

An evaluation of telehealth in the provision of rheumatologic consults to a remote area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193652
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Aug;28(8):1910-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
P. Davis
R. Howard
P. Brockway
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Aug;28(8):1910-3
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Child
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Remote Consultation - economics - organization & administration
Rheumatology - economics - organization & administration
Rural Health Services - economics - organization & administration
State Medicine - economics - organization & administration
Abstract
To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of providing telehealth consultations in rheumatology.
A prospective review of new consults from a rural area assessed by a rheumatologist in an urban area using telehealth. Patient demographics were recorded along with a self-administered questionnaire reporting assessment of the acceptability of the process. Referring physician and consultant provided open ended feedback as to relative strengths and weaknesses of telehealth versus traditional consult. A simple cost and time benefit analysis was undertaken.
The spectrum of patients with rheumatic disease assessed was similar to a traditional consultation clinic. Patients found the overall process to be acceptable and effective. Apart from accessibility to specialist consultation, the greatest benefit was improved communication among patient, referring physician, and consultant. The process was determined to be efficient in both time and cost savings.
Telehealth rheumatology consultations are feasible, acceptable, and cost/time effective and are therefore advocated for those geographic areas where traditional consultations are not readily available.
Notes
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 2001 Aug;28(8):1745-611508572
PubMed ID
11508599 View in PubMed
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Angus Reid poll finds Albertans believe health cuts have affected nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199958
Source
Alta RN. 1999 Mar-Apr;55(2):12-3
Publication Type
Article

Anne McLellan: new direction from a new minister?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190982
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Mar 5;166(5):639
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-2002

Canadian nurses launch TV campaign for public support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104772
Source
Nurs Stand. 2014 Mar 12-18;28(28):33
Publication Type
Article
Author
Scott Parker
Source
Nurs Stand. 2014 Mar 12-18;28(28):33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Financing, Government - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Lobbying
Nursing Care - organization & administration
Public Opinion
State Medicine - economics
Television
Abstract
It is good to read that nurses in Ontario, Canada, have set up a campaign under the banner 'More nurses, better care!' (News March 5), urging the public to join the fight for more nurses in the province.
PubMed ID
24617398 View in PubMed
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Can Canada afford a truly pan-Canadian approach to elder care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134372
Source
Healthc Pap. 2011;10(4):35-8; discussion 58-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Diana Gibson
Author Affiliation
Parkland Institute, University of Alberta.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2011;10(4):35-8; discussion 58-62
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Assisted Living Facilities - economics
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Financing, Government
Health Services for the Aged - economics - organization & administration
Home Care Services - economics
Humans
Long-Term Care - economics
State Medicine - economics - organization & administration
Taxes
Abstract
This commentary is about Canada's ability to afford a comprehensive pan-Canadian approach to elder care. In redefining the universal public system, a broad and more comprehensive definition of universal public care is needed for those whose physical or mental abilities are impaired. The Scandinavian model affirms that this is both effective and affordable. Comparisons of Canada with other nations in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development on taxation and spending levels reveal that there is room for Canada to increase taxation to fund a Scandinavian model while still having competitive tax and spending rates.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2011;10(4):8-2221593611
PubMed ID
21593614 View in PubMed
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Cancer survival rates and GDP expenditure on health: a comparison of England and Wales and the USA, Denmark, Netherlands, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Switzerland in the 1990s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20190
Source
Public Health. 2000 Sep;114(5):336-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
B T Evans
C. Pritchard
Author Affiliation
Southampton University Trust Hospital, Southampton, UK.
Source
Public Health. 2000 Sep;114(5):336-9
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
England - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - economics - mortality - therapy
Netherlands - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Spain - epidemiology
State Medicine - economics
Survival Rate
Switzerland - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Health funding is central to public health planning and clinical practice, hence this comparison of GDP health expenditure and five year post-diagnostic cancer survival rates of England and Wales with the USA and eight European countries. The three lowest proportional GDP health expenditures over the period 1980-1990 were Denmark, England and Wales, and Spain. The USA had the highest proportional GDP expenditure, followed by France, Germany, and The Netherlands. Overall the USA had the best cancer survival rates in the 14 sites reviewed, followed by Switzerland, The Netherlands, and Germany. The least successful were Spain, England and Wales, and Italy. In respect to the high incidence cancers, colorectal, lung, and female breast cancers, England and Wales survival rates were the poorest of all ten countries, followed by Denmark and Spain. Higher GDP health expenditure and longer survival rates for each gender were significantly correlated indicating a possible association between fiscal input and clinical outcomes, which poses problems for the development of effective public health.
PubMed ID
11035452 View in PubMed
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The changing landscape of healthcare and social policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134370
Source
Healthc Pap. 2011;10(4):44-50; discussion 58-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Wendy Armstrong
Author Affiliation
Citizen Watch on Continuing Care, Alberta Consumers' Association.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2011;10(4):44-50; discussion 58-62
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Long-Term Care - trends
Public Policy - trends
State Medicine - economics - trends
Abstract
The problems in traditional residential long-term care settings described in the lead paper are the tip of the iceberg in relation to changes in the landscape of healthcare and social policy in Canada over the past two decades. The primary purpose of this commentary is to identify some of the less visible changes and how these are affecting our perceptions, values and policy directions in "long-term care," however it is defined. The secondary purpose is to caution readers of the dangers of trying to resolve all social policy issues through medicare. This temptation is an artifact of our history and fragmented constitutional powers. It is also due to a well-intended but highly problematic shift in the nature and purpose of public health insurance (and government) in Canada during the 1990s. Without a greater understanding of these and other underlying issues, a pan-Canadian program dedicated to residential long-term care under the upcoming Health Accord risks adding to existing problems. There is also a desperate need for better understanding of the intergenerational needs of Canadian families in relation to healthcare and eldercare.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2011;10(4):8-2221593611
PubMed ID
21593616 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.